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    Hey, what did people get for the mistake in the proof??
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    I originally was thinking it was a +/- solution to the square root but spotted that the student had put dy/dx = dy/dt , which is wrong of course so i put that dy/dx = (dy/dt).(dt/dx) not dy/dx = dy/dt

    Thought it was a hard paper though, In my opinion it was not much like the past papers at all or even the specimen, having said that the specimen is never much like anything anyway.
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    hey ppl, i've just done the whole of alevel maths in one year. i am of course a further mathematician, but am i allowed to sit the aea next academic year??
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    (Original post by mabs)
    hey ppl, i've just done the whole of alevel maths in one year. i am of course a further mathematician, but am i allowed to sit the aea next academic year??
    yeh
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    I found the whole thing really difficult, and to be honest I don't hold out too much hope of passing. The thing that annoyed me was there was no way of doing the second bits of the questions if you got stuck in the first bit (esp. qs 3 & 4)
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    I hate the way if you had done it had home in a relaxed environment you would have been able to do better... and like the way that the other papers were just nicer....... meh
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    I thought that the paper was very difficult. There was even a trap in the first question on trig equations.
    Its supposed to be a tough, demanding exam but the previous years' papers did not alert students to the level of difficulty.
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    ... what wasthe trap..or did i miss that aswell?
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    I did my maths AEA last year, finished with roughly 30 minutes to spare. Never bothered to check the answers, otherwise I probably would have got over 90 marks rather than the 89 I got.

    I did STEP II and III last week. STEP II was about 4 or 5 times harder, but STEP III was just impossible. Although you only have to answer 6 out 14 questions on each paper, it was still a tall order even for the best in my college. Anyway, here's some quote from a Cambridge lecturer.

    The Advanced Extension Award

    The new world class tests, now called Advanced Extension Awards, were taken for the first time in 2002. It is too early yet to say to what extent (if at all) they will replace STEP. One difficulty is that they are aimed at the top 10% or so of the A-level cohort; i.e. at the top 7000 or so. STEP is aimed at the top 1000 or so. This difference matters, because in mathematics (though not perhaps in other subjects) it is important to match the difficulty of the question and the ability of the candidates exactly. Another difficulty is that (at present), the AEA mathematics contains questions on only the core A-level syllabus: no statistics and (more important) no mechanics. Many of my colleagues believe that, apart from the resulting reduction of choice, this is undesirable because it sends out the wrong signals about the importance of these other areas of mathematics.
    He mentioned something about the fact that machenics and stats are unavailable in AEA, but to the best of my knowledge, no one from my college has ever attempted any machenics or stats questions during any STEP.

    Last year, 63 for a distinction, I think...
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    (Original post by richard1024)
    I originally was thinking it was a +/- solution to the square root but spotted that the student had put dy/dx = dy/dt , which is wrong of course so i put that dy/dx = (dy/dt).(dt/dx) not dy/dx = dy/dt

    Thought it was a hard paper though, In my opinion it was not much like the past papers at all or even the specimen, having said that the specimen is never much like anything anyway.
    he didn't put dy/dx = dy/dt i'm sure :confused:

    i thought he just treated t as a constant but t was in fact a function of x, which he hadn't taken account for.

    Edit: replace all 'he' with 'she'
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    i really dont want my teachers to see the mark that i get.
    camford, you said last year it was 63 for a distinction... any ideas what it was for a merit? ....
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    (Original post by orange soap)
    i really dont want my teachers to see the mark that i get.
    camford, you said last year it was 63 for a distinction... any ideas what it was for a merit? ....
    I think even the 63 would be wrong, but it was certainly lower than 70. There were only two distinctions last year. Funny enough both of the two were first-years. No one got a merit last year. Apart from the 2 dist, everyone else failed. I reckon, a merit must be 50 or lower, 45 perhaps.

    There was a teacher organising AEA maths last year in my college, one hour a week for all those people who wanted to polish their skills. He was the only one got send the results. I only found out my marks in October. You have nothing to worry about, you'll be long gone when your teacher gets the letter.
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    (Original post by orange soap)
    ... what wasthe trap..or did i miss that aswell?
    Well, maybe as this was an exam for the top 10 %, most students coped with the problem.

    The usual method of solution would be

    1) Bring cosx to the other side.
    2) Square both sides and simplify using trig identities.
    3) Solve resulting equations sinx = 0 and tanx = 1.

    This gives x = 0, 45, 180 and 215 as apparent solutions.
    Testing the solutions only x = 180 and 215 work!

    Is there an alternative method where only the correct solutions are found?
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    Dunno what the question was but obviously youve introduced solutions through squaring, so a method where only the valid solutions to the original equation are found would not involve squaring
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    doh, 3 hours and i didnt even think to check my answers hahahahaha
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    (Original post by jonas123)
    he didn't put dy/dx = dy/dt i'm sure :confused:

    i thought he just treated t as a constant but t was in fact a function of x, which he hadn't taken account for.

    Edit: replace all 'he' with 'she'
    Sorry the paper is becomming a bit of blur to me now so I'm not sure of anything that I say regarding it, but the reason I said that was that:
    "the student" did not write dy/dx = dy/dt but the line before was of the format y = f(x, t) (I can't remember if x was in there), if it was then I guess I'm wrong but if it was y = f(t) then the next line where "the student" differentiated implied dy/dx = dy/dt (so it wasn't correct). Oh well probably another mark I've lost!!! :mad:
 
 
 
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