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Why do worse Universities have better employment opportunities? Watch

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    I have been accepted to study Linguistics at Manchester, York and Lancaster. On the complete university guide Lancaster scores higher than Manchester in pretty much every way whilst York is very close behind Lancaster.

    Why is it then that Manchester, according to several surveys conducted, is considered a more desirable University to employers both in the UK and globally?
    Is it simply because of a reputation that may not be representative of its performance, or is it because it has stronger links with companies in certain industries?

    Another question which may be slightly harder to answer, but how can I find out which University out of those three will more likely get me accepted on to a masters program once I graduate? I imagine Lancaster will be since it is always in the top 5 for linguistics in the UK but Manchester again may be more desirable for some reason.
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    (Original post by mmquicksand)
    I have been accepted to study Linguistics at Manchester, York and Lancaster. On the complete university guide Lancaster scores higher than Manchester in pretty much every way whilst York is very close behind Lancaster.

    Why is it then that Manchester, according to several surveys conducted, is considered a more desirable University to employers both in the UK and globally?
    Is it simply because of a reputation that may not be representative of its performance, or is it because it has stronger links with companies in certain industries?

    Another question which may be slightly harder to answer, but how can I find out which University out of those three will more likely get me accepted on to a masters program once I graduate? I imagine Lancaster will be since it is always in the top 5 for linguistics in the UK but Manchester again may be more desirable for some reason.
    The question you might more usefully ask is, What proportion of my university's alumni take up genuine graduate jobs rather than undertaking clerical, retail or blue collar work in order to keep the wolf from the door?
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    The question you might more usefully ask is, What proportion of my university's alumni take up genuine graduate jobs rather than undertaking clerical, retail or blue collar work in order to keep the wolf from the door?
    I am basing my information off of these two surveys which suggests they are actual graduate jobs.

    https://www.timeshighereducation.com...g-2015-results

    https://www.timeshighereducation.com...ajor-employers
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    Agree with Bloke that you need to look behind the headline figures to see where the graduates are going. If more are getting good quality graduate jobs, then it may be more to do with the course and Uni fostering better ties with employers.. If your course is specialist, then look the performance of grads from your course rather than the uni as a whole.

    It depends which masters.
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    (Original post by mmquicksand)
    I am basing my information off of these two surveys which suggests they are actual graduate jobs.
    Those are walls of text. Which statement in particular are you reading in that way?
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    The online survey was completed between April and August 2015 by 2,287 recruiters from 21 countries: Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, Poland, Russia, Singapore, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the UK and the US. The countries were chosen on the basis that they are the main global players in higher education, accounting for more than 80 per cent of students worldwide, and have at least one internationally recognised university.The ranking was created from the combined votes from two “panels”. For one panel, respondents from across the 21 countries were asked to indicate which institutions from a list of their local universities produced the most employable graduates. Companies could cast between three and 15 votes depending on how many of their country’s institutions were entered into the survey; Swiss recruiters, for instance, had just 11 universities to choose from, while US companies had 92. Companies that recruit internationally were also asked to vote for up to 10 universities in the world that, in their experience, produce the most employable graduates.The second panel consisted of 2,400 managing directors of internationally recruiting companies (or subsidiaries) with more than 1,000 employees. Each cast a maximum of 10 votes for local or global universities. The ranking is based on the total number of votes each institution received.Companies were also asked a series of questions about the characteristics they value in universities and graduates.


    Employers are picking Universities from a list based on their opinion, it isn't based on the ratio of students that enter employment regardless of the quality of employment. It doesn't state in the methodology which universities in the UK were available to be chosen from, I am guessing only universities from the major cities in the UK were chosen since six out of the top ten universities in the UK according to thecompleteuniversityguide.co.uk don't make the list and they happen to be in relatively small cities. I am going to assume that globally, employers don't care to research which university you went to and are just going to assume that the most famous cities in the UK are going to have the best universities.
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    (Original post by mmquicksand)
    Employers are picking Universities from a list based on their opinion, it isn't based on the ratio of students that enter employment regardless of the quality of employment.
    Then the rankings are completely subjective and not based at all on what you said they were based on ("actual graduate jobs"). They constitute, in short, another worthless ranking table.
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    (Original post by mmquicksand)
    I have been accepted to study Linguistics at Manchester, York and Lancaster. On the complete university guide Lancaster scores higher than Manchester in pretty much every way whilst York is very close behind Lancaster.

    Why is it then that Manchester, according to several surveys conducted, is considered a more desirable University to employers both in the UK and globally?
    Is it simply because of a reputation that may not be representative of its performance, or is it because it has stronger links with companies in certain industries?

    Another question which may be slightly harder to answer, but how can I find out which University out of those three will more likely get me accepted on to a masters program once I graduate? I imagine Lancaster will be since it is always in the top 5 for linguistics in the UK but Manchester again may be more desirable for some reason.
    Manchester usually ranks lower in surveys because of student satisfaction. At the end of the day the three are very good universities and what will make the difference when it comes to employment is you and its the same with masters degrees.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    Then the rankings are completely subjective and not based at all on what you said they were based on ("actual graduate jobs". They constitute, in short, another worthless ranking table.
    I didnt state in my original post that they were based on graduate jobs, you assumed they werent and i assumed they were, the article doesnt state either way. I dont think the survey is useless either since the opinion of the people taking the survey have a large influence over whether you will get employed, regardless of whether their opinion is correct or backed by reason.
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    Because there are lots of McDonalds jobs around
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    (Original post by mmquicksand)
    I didnt state in my original post that they were based on graduate jobs, you assumed they werent and i assumed they were, the article doesnt state either way.
    You said you assumed it was in post three. It isn't, as you have since told us. It is based on a survey of opinions. You must form your own conclusion as to its value.
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    I'd recommend looking at the HESA data rather than perceived "employability" of graduates by a group of recruiters. That can be found in a handy excel spreadsheet here - https://www.hesa.ac.uk/pr/3636-press-release-218

    Even the HESA data will be somewhat flawed though. As has been insinuated above, full-time employment does not necessarily account for under-employment (when someone is working in a job that does not require a degree).

    I'd also stress that employment rates will vary massively between degree subjects. Therefore universities with a focus on more vocational based courses (like Lancaster) and a focus on specific subjects (roughly 65 subjects in total) may look more impressive compared to somewhere like Manchester where you can pretty much study anything (roughly 100 subjects in total).
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    (Original post by mmquicksand)
    ......
    Having worked in this area I can tell you that weaker Universities invest much more time, effort and resources into manipulating the data they submit to these organisations, including HESA, than the upper end of the RG do. I'd take them with a pinch of salt and not infer anything without accepting a very large margin of error.
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    Going to good uni =! Automatically getting a top tier, or if any, job. People need to get this f***** up concept out of their brains.

    Getting top tier job = Good uni + good degree + work experience + soft skills + hard skills + relevant interests + dedication + time + luck
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    "University prestige" is the world's biggest delusion. Those rankings only matter for research. Lower ranked universities tend to be ex-polytechnics which have a history of preparing people for work. This is why they rank higher for employment but lower in the main rankings. Believe it or not an engineering graduate from South Bank is more employable than a Norse literature graduate from Cambridge. One has actual work-ready skills and likely did an industrial placement, the other read runes all day...
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    (Original post by mmquicksand)
    I have been accepted to study Linguistics at Manchester, York and Lancaster…
    Short point: Manchester and York are Russell Group, Lancaster is not. Will make a difference to at least some people.
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    This is just a generalisation but older the uni the more prestige they have attached to them, as they've been around longer to build their reputation. It doesn't necessarily mean they're any better at teaching the subject in question.
 
 
 
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