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    Hi All,

    Just received an unconditional offer for Food Science MSc at Reading looking at accommodation now, i'm a bit older (25) so not sure about moving into halls filled with 1st years again (don't get me wrong I loved it the first time around but not sure I could do it/afford it again).

    In the University guide they say there is no specific postgraduate halls, but they try to group postgrads together. Are there any postgrads out there that have already applied and secured accommodation? Did you go private rental or university halls?
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    I'm now thinking St George's washbasin room - says there's a postgraduate area. Would love to hear if there's any other postgrads going for this option!
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    Hi Sam, Currently a postgraduate in St George's, I went for the washbasin room, I recommend it - it's good value for money and the block is very quite. I am advertising my room for the summer if you wanted to get settled earlier. Just let me know if you're interested, or want further information.
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    (Original post by Martin2006)
    Hi Sam, Currently a postgraduate in St George's, I went for the washbasin room, I recommend it - it's good value for money and the block is very quite. I am advertising my room for the summer if you wanted to get settled earlier. Just let me know if you're interested, or want further information.
    Hi Martin, thanks for the info. I wouldn't be moving there until September so no need for the room in the summer but thanks anyway. Was your room in a separate postgrad area or mixed with freshers? I don't want to sound like i'm allergic to teenagers but I should probably get some work done this year and I'm not sure my liver could take another 1st year.
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    Cool, ah that's cool no worries. Oakhurst is a separate block for postgraduates - they automatically put you there if you apply to St Georges - which is great as it is the block where the launderettes are and private study area and is close to reception. I understand what you mean about the first years, it's quiet enough to get work done, I've had no real issues really
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    Cheers for the help. I'll put down St George's and go for private accommodation at the same time and see what happens!
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    I have an offer for MSc Management and am awaiting on news of scholarship funding. Am trying to work out accommodation costs. St George's Washbasin is by far the cheapest but I had a terrible experience year one at my own university. We had two showers between the fifteen of us, and one freezer and only two fridges. Do you know what the ratio is in St George's?

    Thanks
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    Hi Sam, I am a postgraduate student in Biological Sciences.I know its a bit expensive but i accepted Mackinder Hall. Have u made a decision yet?
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    Hi,
    I'm starting a masters at Reading in September and am weighing up accommodation options. The St George's basin room seems to be the only one comparable in price to private rentals, though the peace of mind to have a place sorted would be nice.

    Could any slightly older postgrads (I'm 30) give me their experiences of these rooms? How are the facilities? Is there room for a TV?

    Or is it a better idea to seek out a private rental on one of the Facebook groups?

    Cheers!
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    (Original post by Sam321123)
    Hi All,

    Just received an unconditional offer for Food Science MSc at Reading looking at accommodation now, i'm a bit older (25) so not sure about moving into halls filled with 1st years again (don't get me wrong I loved it the first time around but not sure I could do it/afford it again).

    In the University guide they say there is no specific postgraduate halls, but they try to group postgrads together. Are there any postgrads out there that have already applied and secured accommodation? Did you go private rental or university halls?
    Congrats on getting a place! I haven't applied yet but I'm hoping to get a place on the MA Medieval Studies course.
    It made me grin a bit when you described yourself as being "a bit older". I'll be 30 in September! I guess that rather begs the question of what I've been doing with myself since graduating, but it's a bit of a long story. I didn't become an undergraduate until I was 21 and I worked abroad for a bit after graduating.

    Anyhoo, I have similar concerns to you regarding accommodation. Don't think I could stand the general mess of a first year place, which I barely tolerated as a 21 year old. But reading some replies to your message it seems that graduates' needs are taken into consideration and we're more than likely to be grouped together.
    Cost is important too, as you say. Although I'd preferably have my own ensuite shower room, I think I'd manage with a basin only room providing housemates are fairly clean and tidy.
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    (Original post by MonkeyMajic)
    Congrats on getting a place! I haven't applied yet but I'm hoping to get a place on the MA Medieval Studies course.
    It made me grin a bit when you described yourself as being "a bit older". I'll be 30 in September! I guess that rather begs the question of what I've been doing with myself since graduating, but it's a bit of a long story. I didn't become an undergraduate until I was 21 and I worked abroad for a bit after graduating.
    Sorry for hijacking the post but just out of curiosity - what kind of resumé are you applying with if you don't mind me asking? I mainly mean research experience and GPA?
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    (Original post by Mliz)
    Sorry for hijacking the post but just out of curiosity - what kind of resumé are you applying with if you don't mind me asking? I mainly mean research experience and GPA?
    I assume that you are from the US? I'm not entirely sure how an international application is conducted, but in my case I presume I'll be applying (I haven't started yet by the way) mainly on the strength of my Bachelor of Arts in Classical Studies.
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    (Original post by MonkeyMajic)
    I assume that you are from the US? I'm not entirely sure how an international application is conducted, but in my case I presume I'll be applying (I haven't started yet by the way) mainly on the strength of my Bachelor of Arts in Classical Studies.
    Oh sorry, I'm actually from another EU country - we don't use distinctions for the degree, just GPA (and I assume getting first in the UK is harder than getting a decent GPA in some other countries, for example). The reason why I'm asking is that I have exactly the same plan to apply to UoR for Medieval Studies and I'm in a very similar boat to you (graduated in 2011, almost 30), so was kind of exploring what background other applicants have
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    (Original post by Mliz)
    Oh sorry, I'm actually from another EU country - we don't use distinctions for the degree, just GPA (and I assume getting first in the UK is harder than getting a decent GPA in some other countries, for example). The reason why I'm asking is that I have exactly the same plan to apply to UoR for Medieval Studies and I'm in a very similar boat to you (graduated in 2011, almost 30), so was kind of exploring what background other applicants have
    Wow. It appears that we are in fact pretty much in the SAME boat. I graduated in the same year as you too. Sorry for automatically assuming you were American, but your use of resumé at first suggested it, and then when I looked up GPA (I wasn't aware of that initialism) I noticed that it was an American abbreviation.

    Anyway...it's great to find someone who is also planning on studying the same subject as me! What are your main interests in the period? Looking at the optional module list, I can see that I'm probably going to go more down the literature/linguistic root (Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales etc). Are you looking to do an MRes or MA? I'm 90% leaning towards MA.

    In reference to your concerns regarding background, I'm not entirely sure what sort of hurdles you will face. If it helps in any way, I don't have a "traditional" academic background. I pretty much made a mess of my formal education (was lazy and disinterested) and had to make up for it with self study in order to get a place at university. I got a moderate 2:1, which is fairly good and demonstrable at least of potential to complete a post graduate degree.
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    (Original post by MonkeyMajic)
    Wow. It appears that we are in fact pretty much in the SAME boat. I graduated in the same year as you too. Sorry for automatically assuming you were American, but your use of resumé at first suggested it, and then when I looked up GPA (I wasn't aware of that initialism) I noticed that it was an American abbreviation.
    No worries at all, the reason I'm using GPA is because it's just a convenient way to refer to my grades. My university did use ECTS (European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System) grading scale actually, but the conversion tables I've found are somewhat different (ECTS's A ranging from 70% to 78% in the UK system, for example).

    (Original post by MonkeyMajic)
    Anyway...it's great to find someone who is also planning on studying the same subject as me! What are your main interests in the period? Looking at the optional module list, I can see that I'm probably going to go more down the literature/linguistic root (Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales etc). Are you looking to do an MRes or MA? I'm 90% leaning towards MA.
    Yes, it is nice indeed to see fellow (potential) applicants! I haven't really figured out what I want to do exactly, but I've entertained the idea of researching the Crusades. However, I don't exclude anything else yet either - for instance, I was quite taken with social history during my undergraduate studies. UoR does seem to offer plenty of opportunities for students who want to study literature in the context of Medieval Studies. I actually went to one of their open days and it was brilliant - even though there was only one more student besides me interested in Medieval Studies (and 5+ prospective students for English Literature in the same building), they emhpasised on the ability to conduct interdisciplinary research if needed (e.g getting help from the Archaeology or English Literature department). Have you checked out any of the potential supervisors whose interests align with yours?

    Oh and I am leaning towards MRes, funnily enough, since when I first started to look into applying, I was almost certain I wanted to do the MA. The main reason I have changed my mind is because I intend to continue my research studies afterwards. Are you planning on pursuing a PhD perhaps?

    (Original post by MonkeyMajic)
    In reference to your concerns regarding background, I'm not entirely sure what sort of hurdles you will face. If it helps in any way, I don't have a "traditional" academic background. I pretty much made a mess of my formal education (was lazy and disinterested) and had to make up for it with self study in order to get a place at university. I got a moderate 2:1, which is fairly good and demonstrable at least of potential to complete a post graduate degree.
    Well, I have no idea what kind of admission rates they have at postgraduate level. All I know is that they require at least 2:1 and since I'm not from the UK, I also had to take an IELTS test (I actually don't have the results yet). I did quite well during my undergraduate studies with some hiccups here and there but overall my average weighted grade was ~4,5/5 - have to see how UoR is going to convert it. I didn't write a dissertation though because I chose to take an overall exam instead. One thing which makes you a very strong candidate is the fact that your past work experience is somewhat connected to your potential studies (I "stalked" your posts, sorry:P). Sadly I can't say the same, since I've been working in completely unrelated fields. Hence the reason I'm applying - I'd really like to continue my studies in (Medieval) history. Or well, I haven't actually applied yet, since I'm stuck at writing my Statement of Purpose!

    I'd love to know the average amount of applicants they get and their acceptance rate, though
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    (Original post by Mliz)
    Yes, it is nice indeed to see fellow (potential) applicants! I haven't really figured out what I want to do exactly, but I've entertained the idea of researching the Crusades. However, I don't exclude anything else yet either - for instance, I was quite taken with social history during my undergraduate studies. UoR does seem to offer plenty of opportunities for students who want to study literature in the context of Medieval Studies. I actually went to one of their open days and it was brilliant - even though there was only one more student besides me interested in Medieval Studies (and 5+ prospective students for English Literature in the same building), they emhpasised on the ability to conduct interdisciplinary research if needed (e.g getting help from the Archaeology or English Literature department). Have you checked out any of the potential supervisors whose interests align with yours?
    No, I haven't been to an open day or checked out potential supervisors as of yet. I have however researched the university as well as the course and optional modules available, and I'm already sure that I wan't to study at UoR more so than other universities. I was actually deliberating on whether or not to study at Reading as an undergraduate (I didn't in the end), so it would be nice to finally study there as a post grad.


    (Original post by Mliz)
    Oh and I am leaning towards MRes, funnily enough, since when I first started to look into applying, I was almost certain I wanted to do the MA. The main reason I have changed my mind is because I intend to continue my research studies afterwards. Are you planning on pursuing a PhD perhaps?
    I'm not 100% sure, although I am definitely considering it. Especially as from 2018 the government is supposed to be introducing loans for PhD study. In a way I feel the same as you - should I do an MRes? - but then looking at the credentials of many lecturers at the university, a lot of them have MA rather than MRes, so that shouldn't be a barrier to PhD study.


    (Original post by Mliz)
    Well, I have no idea what kind of admission rates they have at postgraduate level. All I know is that they require at least 2:1 and since I'm not from the UK, I also had to take an IELTS test (I actually don't have the results yet). I did quite well during my undergraduate studies with some hiccups here and there but overall my average weighted grade was ~4,5/5 - have to see how UoR is going to convert it. I didn't write a dissertation though because I chose to take an overall exam instead.
    One thing which makes you a very strong candidate is the fact that your past work experience is somewhat connected to your potential studies (I "stalked" your posts, sorry:P). Sadly I can't say the same, since I've been working in completely unrelated fields. Hence the reason I'm applying - I'd really like to continue my studies in (Medieval) history. Or well, I haven't actually applied yet, since I'm stuck at writing my Statement of Purpose!
    I'm sure you'll have little trouble where English language proficiency is concerned. Yes, I actually wrote to the faculty and they said much the same. I have a friend who went to study for his MA in Medieval Studies at a university in Budapest, and he was a standard History graduate. The good thing about Medieval Studies (at UoR and other institutions) is that it essentially has to be interdisciplinary, as the subject is not available as an undergraduate course. So as you say, it relies on a lot of input from other departments - the classics department, history, English language and literature etc. So I think they assume that people taking the MA in Medieval Studies will naturally come from a wide range of backgrounds.

    We seem to have taken over this thread! We should probably start a new one related to Medieval Studies.
    But getting back on topic...what are your opinions regarding the accommodation situation? In my undergraduate days I was used to having an ensuite bathroom, but now - in an effort to be more frugal - I'm leaning towards a basin only room. Other than that there is always the option of private rent. I just think that once you add up the cost of heating/electric/gas bills it might be worth just going for Halls...especially as it's only for one year.
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    (Original post by MonkeyMajic)
    No, I haven't been to an open day or checked out potential supervisors as of yet. I have however researched the university as well as the course and optional modules available, and I'm already sure that I wan't to study at UoR more so than other universities. I was actually deliberating on whether or not to study at Reading as an undergraduate (I didn't in the end), so it would be nice to finally study there as a post grad.
    I feel exactly the same way in terms of studying - UoR just "feels" really good!

    (Original post by MonkeyMajic)
    I'm not 100% sure, although I am definitely considering it. Especially as from 2018 the government is supposed to be introducing loans for PhD study. In a way I feel the same as you - should I do an MRes? - but then looking at the credentials of many lecturers at the university, a lot of them have MA rather than MRes, so that shouldn't be a barrier to PhD study.
    Well, the differences are quite small and both are completely fine to go further with (if anything, MA is more common as you mentioned already). MA seems to have more leniency - 3 optional modules instead of 2; the opportunity to conduct a Source Study instead of Latin and Palaeography and finally a tiny bit shorter dissertation without the need to make an oral presentation. To be fair, I would love to take 3 modules instead of 2, there seem to be so many interesting ones! From what I've heard, you can also take a language course instead of one optional module as long as it helps with your research. You mentioned you got your undergraduate degree in Classical Studies so I presume you are somewhat familiar with Latin already For example, I have never really touched Latin, so I would actually like to take it - MRes just makes more sense in my situation I guess, since my undergraduate degree focused mainly on archaeology and secondary research.

    (Original post by MonkeyMajic)
    I'm sure you'll have little trouble where English language proficiency is concerned. Yes, I actually wrote to the faculty and they said much the same. I have a friend who went to study for his MA in Medieval Studies at a university in Budapest, and he was a standard History graduate. The good thing about Medieval Studies (at UoR and other institutions) is that it essentially has to be interdisciplinary, as the subject is not available as an undergraduate course. So as you say, it relies on a lot of input from other departments - the classics department, history, English language and literature etc. So I think they assume that people taking the MA in Medieval Studies will naturally come from a wide range of backgrounds.

    We seem to have taken over this thread! We should probably start a new one related to Medieval Studies.
    But getting back on topic...what are your opinions regarding the accommodation situation? In my undergraduate days I was used to having an ensuite bathroom, but now - in an effort to be more frugal - I'm leaning towards a basin only room. Other than that there is always the option of private rent. I just think that once you add up the cost of heating/electric/gas bills it might be worth just going for Halls...especially as it's only for one year.
    I am lucky in a way that I'm actually already living nearby and I'm going to commute by train (one way takes around 30 minutes). Obviously it highly depends on what kind of modules are you taking but they mentioned on the open day that most of the compulsory modules are planned on Thursdays, so I wouldn't have to go there every day (not that I would mind, of course). If I were you, I would probably go for Halls, though, because from what I've read Reading seems to be rather expensive in terms of private rooms.

    I sound a bit silly because here I am, in a thread about PG accomodation at Reading On that note, I'm going to start a new thread for potential Medieval historians on this subforum, so I wouldn't have to hijack other threads anymore.
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    (Original post by Story07)
    Hi Sam, I am a postgraduate student in Biological Sciences.I know its a bit expensive but i accepted Mackinder Hall. Have u made a decision yet?
    Hey, In the end I think i'm going to have to go for private accommodation, I just can't justify a halls place as I will have to work an extra day a week to pay for it Still looking for a house, around £350-400.
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    (Original post by TheOracle795)
    I have an offer for MSc Management and am awaiting on news of scholarship funding. Am trying to work out accommodation costs. St George's Washbasin is by far the cheapest but I had a terrible experience year one at my own university. We had two showers between the fifteen of us, and one freezer and only two fridges. Do you know what the ratio is in St George's?

    Thanks
    I've just tagged two of you, hope it works! If there are some of us Master's students out there looking for a house in september would you be interested in finding a house together? It looks like you can get a better deal if you approach a landlord with a whole house than finding a spareroom on the facebook group.
    I think I will ask on the main Uni Reading subforum and see if anyone is interested too!

    Sam
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    Official TSR Representative
    (Original post by Sam321123)
    Hi All,

    Just received an unconditional offer for Food Science MSc at Reading looking at accommodation now, i'm a bit older (25) so not sure about moving into halls filled with 1st years again (don't get me wrong I loved it the first time around but not sure I could do it/afford it again).

    In the University guide they say there is no specific postgraduate halls, but they try to group postgrads together. Are there any postgrads out there that have already applied and secured accommodation? Did you go private rental or university halls?
    Hi Sam,

    Congrats on your offer!

    If you’re unsure about university halls, at Central Studios Reading we have lots of postgrads in our building too.

    We have 141 studio apartments with their own en suite bathroom, kitchenette and a living area with comfy small double bed. We also have a great social space so you could have your own space, but still be around other students when you want to be.

    We’re in town centre, with the university bus stopping in front of our building, so it would take you 10 minutes to be in the heart of campus.

    Check our website for more info, and details on this month's Free Gym membership/ Supermarket voucher offers. http://www.freshstudentliving.co.uk/...tudios-reading

    You can find pictures and info about our events on our facebook: www.facebook.com/CentralStudiosReading

    Hope to hear from you.

    Nora @ Central Studios Reading
 
 
 
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