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    My class is very far behind in English and the exam is in 4 weeks and we haven't started revising or anything, so i wanted to do it on my own but i'm so unsure of where to start. I am doing To Kill a Mockingbird, which is the one i'm most worried about, and An Inspector calls.
    Thanks for any help! How do i learn all this information?
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    • Read over the books if you already haven't
    • Summarise the books in your own words (e.g Chapter 1:_____ Chapter 2:_____ ...)
    • Most of your time should be spent doing past papers
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    (Original post by undercxver)
    • Read over the books if you already haven't
    • Summarise the books in your own words (e.g Chapter 1:_____ Chapter 2:_____ ...)
    • Most of your time should be spent doing past papers
    I just feel like there's so much more to learn and my essay has to be perfect in the exam....
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    (Original post by undercxver)
    • Read over the books if you already haven't
    • Summarise the books in your own words (e.g Chapter 1:_____ Chapter 2:_____ ...)
    • Most of your time should be spent doing past papers
    i disagree with this notion that you have to have done past papers to do well in an exam. make sure you have a good nights sleep the night before?
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    (Original post by ProbablyJade)
    I just feel like there's so much more to learn and my essay has to be perfect in the exam....
    It might seem like a lot, but if you look at the themes used in past papers and attempt those questions I guarantee you will do well.

    I noticed you didn't mention poetry, do you need help with that?

    (Original post by john2054)
    i disagree with this notion that you have to have done past papers to do well in an exam. make sure you have a good nights sleep the night before?
    What sort of rubbish advice is that? :rofl:

    Your definition of doing "well" must be a C or lower.
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    (Original post by undercxver)
    OP I noticed you didn't mention poetry, do you need help with that?



    What sort of rubbish advice is that? :rofl:

    Your definition of doing "well" must be a C or lower.
    And yea... i pretty worried about all of it, including poetry, im aiming for an a* because i'm not doing it a-level and so want to show i have good literacy skills when applying for uni jobs etc
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    I'm on the same boat at the minute as well.

    Incredibly nervous for English Language and Literature.

    My main struggle is timing in Literature and Language exams, and trying to write at length in poetry.
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    (Original post by ProbablyJade)
    And yea... i pretty worried about all of it, including poetry, im aiming for an a* because i'm not doing it a-level and so want to show i have good literacy skills when applying for uni jobs etc
    For my GCSE English Literature I made sure I read through the set texts, you'll have to do this several times. By reading I mean thoroughly analysing the use of text and it's effect on the reader. Essay practice is very useful, once you get the hang of the the exam questions you'll know how to structure your answer.

    What will be useful to learn is important quotes by the characters in the book.

    For poetry make sure you analyse each poem in depth. Make use of online resources to see other interpretations of the poem. Find links in themes run between poems. Re-read over the poems and books as much as you can so you're familiar with them.

    A good way to analyse a text is by using SMILE:

    Structure
    Meaning
    Imagery
    Language
    Effect

    I know some people use PERCIL as a checklist for each paragraph:

    Point
    Evidence
    Reader impact
    Context
    Idea of writer
    Language effect


    You need to remind yourself how you're going to be assessed in an exam so it will be useful to looking at how to gain marks. As the specification follows:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    AO1: respond to texts critically and imaginatively; select and evaluate relevant textual detailto illustrate and support interpretations
    AO2: explain how language, structure and form contribute to writers’ presentation of ideas,themes and settings
    AO3: make comparisons and explain links between texts, evaluating writers’ different waysof expressing meaning and achieving effects
    AO4: relate texts to their social, cultural and historical contexts; explain how texts havebeen influential and significant to self and other readers in different contexts and atdifferent times.


    Use this for OMAM (themes and character): http://www.teachit.co.uk/armoore/prose/ofmiceandmen.htm

    Use Mr Bruff's videos on YouTube for extra help with any text/poem.
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    (Original post by undercxver)
    It might seem like a lot, but if you look at the themes used in past papers and attempt those questions I guarantee you will do well.

    I noticed you didn't mention poetry, do you need help with that?



    What sort of rubbish advice is that? :rofl:

    Your definition of doing "well" must be a C or lower.
    Not at all i'm aiming at a 2.1 level undergraduate. And at universities, a* doesn't exist i'm afraid.

    for gcse it is fine to memorize, but by degree level you are required to become an independent learner and thinker, okay?
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    I might get shot down here, but a big part or English is your natural ability to analyse a text and write fluently. Whilst you won't past if you don't know the text, you can do well if you know the text and can write nicely.

    Read the books so you know them like the back of your hand, jot down key quotes, and do practise questions.
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    Right so for an Inspector Calls, I would suggest going to Revision World, where they have videos on AIC which are soooooo good - they are really perceptive and include quite contextual vocab - I am typing those notes up, adding extra stuff from my revision guide, and using that, I'm am making plans for all the past paper questions.
    Unfortunately I don't think they have it for TKAM but I hope it helps!
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    (Original post by john2054)
    Not at all i'm aiming at a 2.1 level undergraduate. And at universities, a* doesn't exist i'm afraid.

    for gcse it is fine to memorize, but by degree level you are required to become an independent learner and thinker, okay?
    Are you being serious right now. :rofl: We're talking about an English Literature GCSE here.

    You're saying that if a student memorises a book they can ace an exam. Lol no. It requires a lot of preparation which includes mostly exam practice. I understand you're now a university student, but don't forget how difficult GCSE's were.

    I'm not going to bother saying more since you got a pathetic argument. :lol:
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    I'm doing Of Mice and Men and Inspector Calls for mine. I have a good memory anyway, so I manage to learn pretty quickly where in the book events tend to happen (where arguments occur, where certain character descriptions are etc) so I recommend to gain some idea of where everything happens, as this makes it easier for you to find some quotes in the exam which will give you more writing time instead of having to flick through the books.

    For Inspector Calls, learn where about in the book the Inspector reveals information about each character, as these are the locations you'll find the best information for that particular character. You should also get to know the personalities of each character, which is described in the opening scene which you can just infer from, as these will help aid your explanations.

    You don't need to know everything as you'll have the books with you. Just make sure you have a general idea of what everything is like. I recently sat some Literature mock papers, I don't know how I did so I can't tell you if it helped (Going for a B, maybe an A). But I know that most of the marks come from the analysing part, so as long as you have some ideas and opinions about different stages in the books, I think you'll do fine.
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    (Original post by Han-)
    I might get shot down here, but a big part or English is your natural ability to analyse a text and write fluently. Whilst you won't past if you don't know the text, you can do well if you know the text and can write nicely.

    Read the books so you know them like the back of your hand, jot down key quotes, and do practise questions.
    (Original post by queenfluffy23)
    Right so for an Inspector Calls, I would suggest going to Revision World, where they have videos on AIC which are soooooo good - they are really perceptive and include quite contextual vocab - I am typing those notes up, adding extra stuff from my revision guide, and using that, I'm am making plans for all the past paper questions.
    Unfortunately I don't think they have it for TKAM but I hope it helps!
    (Original post by undercxver)
    Are you being serious right now. :rofl: We're talking about an English Literature GCSE here.

    You're saying that if a student memorises a book they can ace an exam. Lol no. It requires a lot of preparation which includes mostly exam practice. I understand you're now a university student, but don't forget how difficult GCSE's were.

    I'm not going to bother saying more since you got a pathetic argument. :lol:
    (Original post by xEmilyxx)
    I'm doing Of Mice and Men and Inspector Calls for mine. I have a good memory anyway, so I manage to learn pretty quickly where in the book events tend to happen (where arguments occur, where certain character descriptions are etc) so I recommend to gain some idea of where everything happens, as this makes it easier for you to find some quotes in the exam which will give you more writing time instead of having to flick through the books.

    For Inspector Calls, learn where about in the book the Inspector reveals information about each character, as these are the locations you'll find the best information for that particular character. You should also get to know the personalities of each character, which is described in the opening scene which you can just infer from, as these will help aid your explanations.

    You don't need to know everything as you'll have the books with you. Just make sure you have a general idea of what everything is like. I recently sat some Literature mock papers, I don't know how I did so I can't tell you if it helped (Going for a B, maybe an A). But I know that most of the marks come from the analysing part, so as long as you have some ideas and opinions about different stages in the books, I think you'll do fine.
    Thank you everybody or your help! i definitely feel a lot more reassured now and will definitely do all the things you have recommended
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    I am doing the wjec English literature exam. I am doing about a boy and to kill a mokingbird but I just don't know anything. Please could someone help me. Thank you
 
 
 
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