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    Few years ago I was diagnosed with mild asthma which if I remember correctly came about from a virus of some sort where I literally felt suffocated and had airway breathing problems for a few days. I did the peak test etc and was given a blue pump.

    To be honest I hardly ever use this thing because I never feel the need to as such. However, I do get breathless sometimes and have done for as long as I can remember. Periods of a sense of tightness within my breathing, as if I have to pump harder to breath. It just makes me wonder if this sensation is normal with asthma and if others get this feeling of breathlessness even if just laying on your bed?

    The thing is that I HATE going to the GP, because unless you walk in with an axe dug into your head they will always do their best to rebuff naything you say and put it down to things such as anxiety etc. It's generally a waste of time. I actually had an ECG done for my heart a few months ago and they said the ECG was fine. I did this through a company which wasn't related to my GP at all.

    Am I supposed to use the blue pump when I get this breathlessness? By not using it am I making my asthma worse in doing so? Shall I make an appointment with my GP nurse maybe just to run things over?
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    I have asthma, and occasionally I'll suddenly feel short of breath. Often when this happens my throat will feel a bit constricted and irritated, and I cough a lot.

    Do you know whether your blue inhaler is a reliever? If it is, then yes, you should use it whenever you feel short of breath. If it's a preventer, then you should use it everyday, whether you feel breathless or not (that's what my doctor told me at least). I think it would be a good idea for you to make an appointment just to check whether you still need your inhaler/need a different one, and how you should be using it if you do
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    (Original post by Parx)
    Few years ago I was diagnosed with mild asthma which if I remember correctly came about from a virus of some sort where I literally felt suffocated and had airway breathing problems for a few days. I did the peak test etc and was given a blue pump.

    To be honest I hardly ever use this thing because I never feel the need to as such. However, I do get breathless sometimes and have done for as long as I can remember. Periods of a sense of tightness within my breathing, as if I have to pump harder to breath. It just makes me wonder if this sensation is normal with asthma and if others get this feeling of breathlessness even if just laying on your bed?

    The thing is that I HATE going to the GP, because unless you walk in with an axe dug into your head they will always do their best to rebuff naything you say and put it down to things such as anxiety etc. It's generally a waste of time. I actually had an ECG done for my heart a few months ago and they said the ECG was fine. I did this through a company which wasn't related to my GP at all.

    Am I supposed to use the blue pump when I get this breathlessness? By not using it am I making my asthma worse in doing so? Shall I make an appointment with my GP nurse maybe just to run things over?
    You need to see your GP. Asthma is still a dangerous condition if it isn't managed properly. If there is something you are not sure of in regards to managing your condition your first port of call is your GP not a message board.
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    (Original post by Leviathan1741)
    I have asthma, and occasionally I'll suddenly feel short of breath. Often when this happens my throat will feel a bit constricted and irritated, and I cough a lot.

    Do you know whether your blue inhaler is a reliever? If it is, then yes, you should use it whenever you feel short of breath. If it's a preventer, then you should use it everyday, whether you feel breathless or not (that's what my doctor told me at least). I think it would be a good idea for you to make an appointment just to check whether you still need your inhaler/need a different one, and how you should be using it if you do
    Um not sure but probably a reliever not a preventer I would think. It is 'Salamol easi-breathe CFC-free Inhaler' 'For Inhalation use'. My note says 'inhale two puffs when required for wheezing'. I think it's just when I feel necessary with wheezing etc. I actually blew 590 on the peak earlier when I was breathless, not too bad.
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    (Original post by Parx)
    Um not sure but probably a reliever not a preventer I would think. It is 'Salamol easi-breathe CFC-free Inhaler' 'For Inhalation use'. My note says 'inhale two puffs when required for wheezing'. I think it's just when I feel necessary with wheezing etc. I actually blew 590 on the peak earlier when I was breathless, not too bad.
    I think that's the same one I have (a reliever). I would still go and see your doctor anyway, just to be on the safe side
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    If you've been diagnosed with asthma and you're having episodes of feeling tight chested and breathless, then yes, use your blue inhaler. That's the point of having it.

    If you find that it helps, and you're having to use it frequently, then you need to re-visit your GP so that they can alter the inhalers that you use. The aim would be to perhaps move you to a different inhaler that you take once or twice a day to stop you from requiring the blue inhaler. The goal would be for you to be symptom free and able to do all the things you want to do, including sports.

    If you find that the inhaler doesn't help and you're still getting these episodes, you need to see your GP to re-visit your diagnosis.

    Final point of safety would be to always ensure that you take your blue inhaler with you when you go out and to make sure that it's not empty.
 
 
 
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