Advice for Creative Writing Postgrad

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Bard16
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Right now I still have one year left and I am doing an Open University degree.
BA(Hons) Humanities in English Literature and Creative Writing. It seems I maybe able to pull off a 2.1 for the Creative Writing part but 2.2 overall.

I want to do a Masters in Creative Writing and have a few questions and some advice here would be really appreciated.

Contextual Info: I will be having a book published (collection of poetry) soon with a top press. I run a literary review and have worked with world renowned writers.I have many years of being published in literary journals and newspapers.

1. What kind of universities would i be able to get into with the above circumstances? My grades are unfortunate i know so will my c.v help?

2. would universities like Edinburgh,U.E.A, Durham, Queens(Belfast) accept me into the C.W masters program? What other options are there, if not?

Thanks in advance Image
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beautifulbigmacs
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Creative writing masters courses will judge you on your application overall because most ask that you send a portfolio of your work as part of your application. It is very possible to get an offer with a 2:2 because I know this from experience. Also the fact that you have the achievements that you do will be a massive support to what will probably be a very strong application.
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Bard16
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oh thank you for the reply, its good to know that it is a strong application.. any suggestions for universities for creative writing??
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DrSocSciences
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If you look at the postgrad options on the UCAS website, there are 100's to choose from, so you'll need to refine your search significantly, - starting with full-time or part-time study etc. For example, there are 98 options in the UK for full-time Creative Writing courses, although of those, there are some standout options that have good reputations, and with highly competitive entry standards.

You should probably anticipate responding to questions regarding the discrepancy between your apparent experience of literary criticism, and the fact that this is the weaker part of your current degree.
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Bard16
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Thank you for replying and posting a valid point. The discrepancies are indeed there but that is attributed more to health issues. However, now I will have a proper response if that query surfaces.
Do you feel that maybe a big point of contention for getting into reputable universities? Or perhaps just a standard enquiry ?
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DrSocSciences
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(Original post by Bard16)
Thank you for replying and posting a valid point. The discrepancies are indeed there but that is attributed more to health issues. However, now I will have a proper response if that query surfaces.
Do you feel that maybe a big point of contention for getting into reputable universities? Or perhaps just a standard enquiry ?
Well, I've no idea if it will crop up, or have an effect, but I know I'd ask you about it in an interview, just to learn more about your approach to studying. Good luck.
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beautifulbigmacs
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(Original post by Bard16)
Thank you for replying and posting a valid point. The discrepancies are indeed there but that is attributed more to health issues. However, now I will have a proper response if that query surfaces.
Do you feel that maybe a big point of contention for getting into reputable universities? Or perhaps just a standard enquiry ?
I got an offer from Salford with a 2:2. Their course looks excellent in terms of the versatility of content and the scope to be original.

I was unable to take up the course but I was impressed. The interview was cool. I can't particularly remember if in that one I was asked about my 2:2 but in any rare instance where I have been people have always been accepting when I provide an honest explanation regarding personal issues. My advice would be don't feel that you have to justify the 2:2 unless asked. You will still have a lot of positives going for you in terms of enthusiasm for the course and the experience you have so definitely hone in on those
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returnmigrant
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Don't waste you time and money. These are nonsense degrees designed to sap money out of the gullible.

You do not need a degree of any sort to be a writer. No publisher or agent will rush up to you on graduation waving a contract, whatever utter rubbish they might tell you to the contrary in the course description.
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spacepirate-James
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(Original post by returnmigrant)
You do not need a degree of any sort to be a writer. No publisher or agent will rush up to you on graduation waving a contract, whatever utter rubbish they might tell you to the contrary in the course description.
This is partly untrue. Publishers and agents do take note of writing degrees, especially reputable ones such as from UEA or Iowa (which produce a disproportional number of successful writers). They often do attend showcases of student works or networking meetings. However I agree completely that you don't need a creative writing degree to be a writer.
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Bard16
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(Original post by beautifulbigmacs)
I got an offer from Salford with a 2:2. Their course looks excellent in terms of the versatility of content and the scope to be original.

I was unable to take up the course but I was impressed. The interview was cool. I can't particularly remember if in that one I was asked about my 2:2 but in any rare instance where I have been people have always been accepting when I provide an honest explanation regarding personal issues. My advice would be don't feel that you have to justify the 2:2 unless asked. You will still have a lot of positives going for you in terms of enthusiasm for the course and the experience you have so definitely hone in on those
That is a very positive response..thank you
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Bard16
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(Original post by returnmigrant)
Don't waste you time and money. These are nonsense degrees designed to sap money out of the gullible.

You do not need a degree of any sort to be a writer. No publisher or agent will rush up to you on graduation waving a contract, whatever utter rubbish they might tell you to the contrary in the course description.
I agree that one does not need a course to be a writer, however in a lot of good universities such as st andrews, UEA, etc one is taught by top top writers who have great experience in this field. I feel it certainly helps to some degree (no pun intended) to have them around to get advice from and to build contacts within the field itself
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Bard16
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(Original post by spacepirate-James)
This is partly untrue. Publishers and agents do take note of writing degrees, especially reputable ones such as from UEA or Iowa (which produce a disproportional number of successful writers). They often do attend showcases of student works or networking meetings. However I agree completely that you don't need a creative writing degree to be a writer.
Agreed. this wont determine if I am a writer or not but it is a personal choice i wish to follow through with. Those are great unis and perhaps unlikely given my grades so i am just looking for decent alternatives
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beautifulbigmacs
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It's ok to embrace education at masters level for other reasons: personal and intellectual development, pleasure from broadening your mind, wishing to teach the subject yourself. That kind of thing.

I think the cost of degrees and seeing them as an investment to get money back from doing them is a reasonable consideration but it can also be not in the spirit of education in that, is doing a course only worth what it will give you back in terms of money? (I think not).
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LaZywiles23
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Damn straight
(Original post by beautifulbigmacs)
It's ok to embrace education at masters level for other reasons: personal and intellectual development, pleasure from broadening your mind, wishing to teach the subject yourself. That kind of thing.

I think the cost of degrees and seeing them as an investment to get money back from doing them is a reasonable consideration but it can also be not in the spirit of education in that, is doing a course only worth what it will give you back in terms of money? (I think not).
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University of East Anglia PG Student Rep
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Hey Bard16,

Although universities generally ask for a 2:1 or First, if you're publishing a collection and running a literary review, I'm sure that's going to help your application get noticed. UEA's MA asks for a 2:1 but clearly states that this is not essential, so I would certainly recommend that you apply. As someone else has said above, the really important thing is going to be your sample of writing.

I am studying for an MA in English Literature and I'm in classes with people from the CW MAs, and I've known lots of other CW MA students over the four years I've been here. I think it's a very special opportunity, not only to have expert tuition on your writing but to spend a year in the company of other writers from all over the world. I would certainly recommend that you apply to UEA.

Please let me know if you have any more questions.

Gabriel, Postgrad Rep
(Original post by Bard16)
Right now I still have one year left and I am doing an Open University degree.
BA(Hons) Humanities in English Literature and Creative Writing. It seems I maybe able to pull off a 2.1 for the Creative Writing part but 2.2 overall.

I want to do a Masters in Creative Writing and have a few questions and some advice here would be really appreciated.

Contextual Info: I will be having a book published (collection of poetry) soon with a top press. I run a literary review and have worked with world renowned writers.I have many years of being published in literary journals and newspapers.

1. What kind of universities would i be able to get into with the above circumstances? My grades are unfortunate i know so will my c.v help?

2. would universities like Edinburgh,U.E.A, Durham, Queens(Belfast) accept me into the C.W masters program? What other options are there, if not?

Thanks in advance Image
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