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    Hello!

    I am currently sitting my AS levels and have diagnosed Clinical Depression, for which I take medication. Due to the mass amounts of anxiety my depression causes, I was unable to sit my GCSE mock exams, my GCSEs, or my AS Level mocks in the exam hall; I sat them on my own so that my uncontrollable panic attacks don't distract everybody sitting in the hall. Though I am striving, by the time it comes to my A-Level exams, to be able to at least sit my exams with a small group of people (maybe even in the exam hall!), I am really worried that, if I am unable to cope, in University I will be thrown into an exam hall with others without any regard to my illness. I have already searched this and it has been proven false, nonetheless, you need a reason, such as illness. Because depression and anxiety is largely stigmatised as being 'an illness for the weak', I am frightened that I will not be allowed the special circumstances of being separated.

    Currently, being in even a large exam hall impairs my performance. I am a student who is targeted at As and Bs, so it's not as if I would do bad regardless of the circumstances.

    Please may I ask that if you have any judgemental comments, please keep them to yourself. Hopefully, I will be in a totally different place by the time I get to University! If it makes a difference, I have been with mental health services for 3 years and, by the time I get to uni, it will be about 5. It's not as if I don't have a history of illness.
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    I don't have a personal experience with anything like this, but from what I've gathered from classmates at my university I think any uni you go to will be accommodating for your illness, and especially as you have a long medical history to back this up then I can't see them being able to find any grounds on which to disregard your needs. One thing you could do (and I think you should!) is to talk to universities about this before you accept any offers, and perhaps even at open days before you apply. I feel that this will stop you from worrying about it, because you'll have confirmation in advance that things will be ok for you, and if any universities seem iffy about it then you can just find a different one to apply to!

    I'd also recommend taking any opportunities you tell the university your circumstances - I think on the application they ask if you have any disabilities or things that you would/might need special considerations for. Even if when you apply you're feeling that you're in a different place, it's better to have your history on the record so the support is already in place if you suddenly need it.

    Whatever happens, good luck!
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    You need to apply for Disabled Students Allowance when you apply for your Student Finance. That's "disabled" in the "disadvantaged" sense, rather than the literal sense. If your application is accepted, you can get a range of helpful facilities from your uni. That can include doing exams in smaller rooms, or even an individual office so that you're on your own.

    Depression and anxiety will be treated in no different way than any other health issue which could give you problems at uni. Uni support departments are well used to helping students with a range of health problems - you will certainly not be the first person they've ever dealt with who has this sort of issue with exams.
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    I would presume that the university would understand and accept the fact that you have depression for the illness it is. As long as you make it known to them and ensure they are aware. I would advise emailing the university about your queries, either now for future reference, or when you apply next year. They may ask for a doctor's note in this case, but you always have your current school as extra proof. However I have never been through this, so I'm sorry if I have been of no help. But I hope you do get through this, and your depression gets better, good luck with your exams!
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    Thank you so much, guys, for the advice. I feel so much better now. Also, thanks for not looking down on me. Hopefully, I will recover enough to sit with everyone else. I mean, it's not as if I don't want to be with everyone else; that, to me, seems promising enough!
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    (Original post by emilybittner)
    Hello!

    I am currently sitting my AS levels and have diagnosed Clinical Depression, for which I take medication. Due to the mass amounts of anxiety my depression causes, I was unable to sit my GCSE mock exams, my GCSEs, or my AS Level mocks in the exam hall; I sat them on my own so that my uncontrollable panic attacks don't distract everybody sitting in the hall. Though I am striving, by the time it comes to my A-Level exams, to be able to at least sit my exams with a small group of people (maybe even in the exam hall!), I am really worried that, if I be unable to cope, in University I will be thrown into an exam hall with others without any regard to my illness. I have already searched this and it has been proven false, nonetheless, you need a reason, such as illness. Because depression and anxiety is largely stigmatised as being 'an illness for the weak', I am frightened that I will not be allowed the special circumstances of being separated.

    Currently, being in even a large exam hall impairs my performance. I am a student who is targeted at As and Bs, so it's not as if I would do bad regardless of the circumstances.

    Please may I ask that if you have any judgemental comments, please keep them to yourself. Hopefully, I will be in a totally different place by the time I get to University! If it makes a difference, I have been with mental health services for 3 years and, by the time I get to uni, it will be about 5. It's not as if I don't have a history of illness.
    The university welfare services are second to none if you can get a doctors note they will provide as much as is possible (which is a lot ) if you need a seprate room you will have that extra time no problem a pc yep a scribe yep you need it you'll get it i promice also if you need it there are councllers and things if things get really tough.

    good luck and I hope you get better (I don't know if you can from clinical depression).
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    (Original post by jonathanemptage)
    The university welfare services are second to none if you can get a doctors note they will provide as much as is possible (which is a lot ) if you need a seprate room you will have that extra time no problem a pc yep a scribe yep you need it you'll get it i promice also if you need it there are councllers and things if things get really tough.

    good luck and I hope you get better (I don't know if you can from clinical depression).
    Thank you.. And you can!! Thanks for being accepting!
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    (Original post by emilybittner)
    Thank you.. And you can!! Thanks for being accepting!
    Everyone's pretty much answered, but I'd like to throw in that yes, Universities are very understanding. My sister has PTSD (as well as a chronic illness) and they've been great! Also just wanted to wish you the best of luck in your exams :-)
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    (Original post by emilybittner)
    Thank you.. And you can!! Thanks for being accepting!
    Two of my closest plans have depression and anxiety, their universities have been brilliant in providing support such as exam adjustments and counselling services are available if they wish to use them. Yes there can be exceptions but from my experience universities are much more inclusive than secondary education is, i have "mild" learning difficulties and i was incredibly pleased at the amount of support they offered me at uni and also how generally flexible they are, universities for me appear to understand that its not a case of one size fits all.
    When you go to open days or are in the process of applying to universities, if you can just ask them about the range of support available to you, usually they should be able to tell you roughly what you could access before you apply
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    Thanks for being so helpful, everyone. I am so much more confident now than I was before posting this question. It makes a huge difference when I know that the pressure can be taken off of me greatly. As I said, hopefully, come Uni, I will have progressed from my current state! Again, thanks a lot
 
 
 
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