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    Hi all,

    Looking for some advice - I currently hold unconditional offers at UCL, Warwick and Nottingham.

    Essentially, I can stretch to cover the additional expenses incurred at UCL/Warwick, but I can't decide whether this will be worth it?

    I did my undergraduate at a seriously non-ranked uni, and am looking to become a professional economist (not particularly interested in a PhD).

    Cheers.
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    UCL ^^
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    (Original post by Alex.D)
    Hi all,

    Looking for some advice - I currently hold unconditional offers at UCL, Warwick and Nottingham.

    Essentially, I can stretch to cover the additional expenses incurred at UCL/Warwick, but I can't decide whether this will be worth it?

    I did my undergraduate at a seriously non-ranked uni, and am looking to become a professional economist (not particularly interested in a PhD).

    Cheers.
    What uni did you go to ?
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    I currently work as a professional economist (applying for PhD programmes for next year entry).

    Let me just start out by saying, undertaking a PhD will without a doubt open more doors. It's a prerequisite for the World Bank and IMF and the majority of central bank jobs. Also, I am one of the few at my firm without a PhD, and no one senior does not have a PhD.

    However, entering the Government Economic Service if you only have a BSc/MSc won't be a problem and is much more typical.

    As for your university choice, all are good and well respected. I would argue that UCL has an edge, being in London, as it means it is easier to access work experience, go for interviews, etc. Warwick is also a very good school and extremely well respected. I am yet to meet anyone from Nottingham. That said, I attended Southampton, which is comparable to Nottingham; all I would recommend is to take the more advanced econometric modules (this will be of great help in your job), and also to ensure your dissertation is on an applied topic focusing on one country (this will be of help depending on the sort of professional economist you become).
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    (Original post by .ACS.)
    I currently work as a professional economist (applying for PhD programmes for next year entry).

    Let me just start out by saying, undertaking a PhD will without a doubt open more doors. It's a prerequisite for the World Bank and IMF and the majority of central bank jobs. Also, I am one of the few at my firm without a PhD, and no one senior does not have a PhD.

    However, entering the Government Economic Service if you only have a BSc/MSc won't be a problem and is much more typical.

    As for your university choice, all are good and well respected. I would argue that UCL has an edge, being in London, as it means it is easier to access work experience, go for interviews, etc. Warwick is also a very good school and extremely well respected. I am yet to meet anyone from Nottingham. That said, I attended Southampton, which is comparable to Nottingham; all I would recommend is to take the more advanced econometric modules (this will be of great help in your job), and also to ensure your dissertation is on an applied topic focusing on one country (this will be of help depending on the sort of professional economist you become).
    Hi,

    Thanks for the reply (and sorry for the slow speed of mine). I've since narrowed the choice down to Warwick and Nottingham, given the high cost of living in London.

    I suppose the logical questions would be is Warwick worth the extra 10k in tuition, and what would be the difference between the two, should I decide to pursue a top MReS/PhD in the UK as you suggest (i.e. Oxford/LSE/UCL etc.) -- perhaps after a couple of years of work?

    Thanks.
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    UCL and Warwick are the same. They'll throw you straight into any job. Warwick is stronger for economics, their department is renowned- many students end up doing exchanges with the Ivies etc
 
 
 
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