MSc Economic History (LSE) GPA Requirement

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    I will be graduating in hopefully a year or maybe a little more than that and I'm doing some preliminary research on graduate schools, particularly the MSc Economic History at LSE and the MSc Economic and Social History at Oxford. I currently go to school in the US, UC Davis to be specific, but I have a feeling that nobody really knows what UC Davis is and it's probably not important anyway.

    I have been told that economic history courses are not particularly popular amongst people seeking a graduate level education because they do not necessarily provide a hard and fast pathway towards a PhD in Economics. However I may be very wrong about this. I've majored in economics because I found out I was really interested in the subject but I later realised that I'm more fond of economic history rather than straight up economics because I find theoretical concepts too abstract without studying them in appropriate contexts.

    It was only recently that I found out about these two programmes at Oxford and LSE and I am really looking forward to studying there. Economic history is not available anywhere in the US and most schools do not offer terminal master's programmes anymore, and I don't like the idea of doing a PhD because spending money to write a dissertation seems very pointless to me as I would rather spend money learning in taught programmes.

    So I had a glimpse at the respective course pages for both of the courses and realised Oxford required a 3.7 GPA and LSE requires a 3.5. I go to a UC and people don't normally have very high GPAs here because of the competition, so I find myself with a lowly 3.3 GPA dreaming about entering these two programmes. If I manage to push it up a little higher, nearer to 3.5, would I stand a realistic chance even if I fall short by the time I graduate? What other factors play a part in admissions in UK universities? I will not be requiring financial aid/funding.
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    I have heard of UC Davis. It is well ranked and a solid public school and has some international exchange programs with UK unis, being part of UC system helps. I guess Davis does not do grade inflation like some Liberal Arts Colleges.

    Good choice, Ox and LSE are the best MSc Econ history. Unfortunately they are very competitive. A friend did MSc Econ History at LSE and enjoyed the course. He reckons that most admits had good GPAs and this is the main requirement. Some reserach experience as student assistant helps. His advice:
    Good letters of recommendation from profs
    Apply early before Christmas
    Statement of Purpose

    You can also hedge yr application. Both are good unis, lower requirements than LSE/Ox and lower tuition.
    York MSc Econ and Social history, run by Econ faculty
    Manchester MSc Econ and Social history, run by School of Arts

    Good luck

    (Original post by blakevanderbilt)
    I will be graduating in hopefully a year or maybe a little more than that and I'm doing some preliminary research on graduate schools, particularly the MSc Economic History at LSE and the MSc Economic and Social History at Oxford. I currently go to school in the US, UC Davis to be specific, but I have a feeling that nobody really knows what UC Davis is and it's probably not important anyway.

    I have been told that economic history courses are not particularly popular amongst people seeking a graduate level education because they do not necessarily provide a hard and fast pathway towards a PhD in Economics. However I may be very wrong about this. I've majored in economics because I found out I was really interested in the subject but I later realised that I'm more fond of economic history rather than straight up economics because I find theoretical concepts too abstract without studying them in appropriate contexts.

    It was only recently that I found out about these two programmes at Oxford and LSE and I am really looking forward to studying there. Economic history is not available anywhere in the US and most schools do not offer terminal master's programmes anymore, and I don't like the idea of doing a PhD because spending money to write a dissertation seems very pointless to me as I would rather spend money learning in taught programmes.

    So I had a glimpse at the respective course pages for both of the courses and realised Oxford required a 3.7 GPA and LSE requires a 3.5. I go to a UC and people don't normally have very high GPAs here because of the competition, so I find myself with a lowly 3.3 GPA dreaming about entering these two programmes. If I manage to push it up a little higher, nearer to 3.5, would I stand a realistic chance even if I fall short by the time I graduate? What other factors play a part in admissions in UK universities? I will not be requiring financial aid/funding.
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    (Original post by blakevanderbilt)
    I will be graduating in hopefully a year or maybe a little more than that and I'm doing some preliminary research on graduate schools, particularly the MSc Economic History at LSE and the MSc Economic and Social History at Oxford. I currently go to school in the US, UC Davis to be specific, but I have a feeling that nobody really knows what UC Davis is and it's probably not important anyway.

    I have been told that economic history courses are not particularly popular amongst people seeking a graduate level education because they do not necessarily provide a hard and fast pathway towards a PhD in Economics. However I may be very wrong about this. I've majored in economics because I found out I was really interested in the subject but I later realised that I'm more fond of economic history rather than straight up economics because I find theoretical concepts too abstract without studying them in appropriate contexts.

    It was only recently that I found out about these two programmes at Oxford and LSE and I am really looking forward to studying there. Economic history is not available anywhere in the US and most schools do not offer terminal master's programmes anymore, and I don't like the idea of doing a PhD because spending money to write a dissertation seems very pointless to me as I would rather spend money learning in taught programmes.

    So I had a glimpse at the respective course pages for both of the courses and realised Oxford required a 3.7 GPA and LSE requires a 3.5. I go to a UC and people don't normally have very high GPAs here because of the competition, so I find myself with a lowly 3.3 GPA dreaming about entering these two programmes. If I manage to push it up a little higher, nearer to 3.5, would I stand a realistic chance even if I fall short by the time I graduate? What other factors play a part in admissions in UK universities? I will not be requiring financial aid/funding.
    I live in NorCal so very familiar with UC Davis

    Unfortunately, you're likely to find that the top tier UK unis are pretty strict on grade entry requirements and don't really take much non-academic stuff into account, especially for a program like this. If you're close to 3.5 it's certainly worth a shot applying to LSE at least. The program is not as competitive as some others and you may be in with a shot. I'd think just short of 3.5 would be pretty certain rejection at Oxford but you could always take a chance. The question is whether you'd want to do the subject badly enough to do it at another uni such as tcannon suggested - ones which may not really have any name recognition in the US - or look for another alternative. I know terminal masters have lost a lot of shine in the US but is there really no option for something similar??
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    Hello blakevanderbilt,

    I have used TSR for a very long time and feel it's time I can help. I'm currently on the 16-17 EH course right now and would say if you have the 3.5 GPA and can genuinely show interest within your PS, then I believe you have a good shot. There are plenty of people on my course, in my opinion do not have the slightest clue of EH really is. Do you reading, get your grades and make a very good PS, (1 page is more than enough - at least for me it was). I applied at the start of January, so you still have time.

    Regards,

    Gwei Lo
 
 
 
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