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    I think it is because as the air rises, it is too hot to condense above deserts, and thus doesnt condense and doesn't rain.
    Whereas above rainforests, the air is less hot so the air can condense and therefore rains.

    Is this correct? I also heard about cycles of air/precipitation in the air like convection currents which relate to rainfall somehow, where peaks would be in certain places? Can you explain this please?

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    It's all to do with Hadley Cell that draws air flows in from the the tropics to the equator. This warm and moist air is forced to rise at the equator and of course cools and condenses as it rises leading to high and constant rainfall values. This cool and dry air then flows out to the north and south of the equator where it eventually descends as cool and dry air over what we know as the deserts. This brief clip from David Attenborough explains it well. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mUHN4Y0x2LI6

    Further information can also be found here http://www.geographypods.com/24-rain...--deserts.html
 
 
 
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