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    I've been feeling down for a while now. Two years. Honestly, I always thought it was just a teenage hormones thing but the older I got the more I realised that I may have a problem.

    I sat down a few days ago and out of pure curiosity googled what tests doctors do for depression. Obviously, most of the results were actual online tests/quizzes to test this and I saw an NHS one (seems reliable, right?) and decided to give it a try, Half way through I found myself crying over how relatable I felt to all the statements that they made. But I didn't exactly give up: I did ten or even more tests. All of them claimed that I may have depression.

    So, as I made myself a promise months ago, I decided to make an appointment with my GP to make sure I'm not being stupid (seriously, how many times have these online tests lied to you?) and now I'm waiting for the date to come, but still some questions are left unanswered.

    First of all, do recurring suicide thoughts and previous attemps always mean depression?

    Secondly, how do I even start when telling the doctor what the problem is?

    And lastly, what does the doctor say? Do they prescribe antidepressants?

    It would also help if you shared your first appointment experiences, I really don't know what to expect and I'm terrified of what's gonna happen (especially that I hate going to doctors).
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    Very Important Poster
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I've been feeling down for a while now. Two years. Honestly, I always thought it was just a teenage hormones thing but the older I got the more I realised that I may have a problem.

    I sat down a few days ago and out of pure curiosity googled what tests doctors do for depression. Obviously, most of the results were actual online tests/quizzes to test this and I saw an NHS one (seems reliable, right?) and decided to give it a try, Half way through I found myself crying over how relatable I felt to all the statements that they made. But I didn't exactly give up: I did ten or even more tests. All of them claimed that I may have depression.

    So, as I made myself a promise months ago, I decided to make an appointment with my GP to make sure I'm not being stupid (seriously, how many times have these online tests lied to you?) and now I'm waiting for the date to come, but still some questions are left unanswered.

    First of all, do recurring suicide thoughts and previous attemps always mean depression?

    Secondly, how do I even start when telling the doctor what the problem is?

    And lastly, what does the doctor say? Do they prescribe antidepressants?

    It would also help if you shared your first appointment experiences, I really don't know what to expect and I'm terrified of what's gonna happen (especially that I hate going to doctors).
    You can get yourself into trouble self diagnosing, so treat them with caution, but:

    Recurring suicide thoughts arent healthy. It depends how serious you are about them and for how long. Fleeting moment, bad day, then I think a lot of people have had them, but longer or doing soemthing about it is not notmal. They would prompt me to go and see the Dr.

    How do you start? Just talk to your GP and tell them how you feel. If you cnat start, then just print off your post here and hand it to them. they are trained and will ask you questions to diagnose properly. Its nothing to be ashamed of and its something they will see every day. It is the first step to getting you better though.

    What will they do? They will chat with you and agree how you wnat to try and solve it. You cna do it on your own, through exercise and diet, they may try you on some antu depressants, which you cna take daily, but take a while to kick in or they can book you an appointment to see a cousnelor.


    Nothing will happen without your consent and you may be surprised at how ordinary it is. Nothing to be afraid of at all, no judgement, just someone listening and trying to help you. Go see your GP and see what they can do for you. It might be a bit of trial and error, but its an importnat start. Dont be afraid, its really not needed.
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    You can get yourself into trouble self diagnosing, so treat them with caution, but:

    Recurring suicide thoughts arent healthy. It depends how serious you are about them and for how long. Fleeting moment, bad day, then I think a lot of people have had them, but longer or doing soemthing about it is not notmal. They would prompt me to go and see the Dr.

    How do you start? Just talk to your GP and tell them how you feel. If you cnat start, then just print off your post here and hand it to them. they are trained and will ask you questions to diagnose properly. Its nothing to be ashamed of and its something they will see every day. It is the first step to getting you better though.

    What will they do? They will chat with you and agree how you wnat to try and solve it. You cna do it on your own, through exercise and diet, they may try you on some antu depressants, which you cna take daily, but take a while to kick in or they can book you an appointment to see a cousnelor.


    Nothing will happen without your consent and you may be surprised at how ordinary it is. Nothing to be afraid of at all, no judgement, just someone listening and trying to help you. Go see your GP and see what they can do for you. It might be a bit of trial and error, but its an importnat start. Dont be afraid, its really not needed.
    Thanks, the reason that I'm going to a GP is hugely based around the fact that I never believe self-diagnosis therefore I want an actual doctor to help me because I have a little knowledge of this.
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    Very Important Poster
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Thanks, the reason that I'm going to a GP is hugely based around the fact that I never believe self-diagnosis therefore I want an actual doctor to help me because I have a little knowledge of this.
    ifc you should go , dont worry and dont make a big deal out of it. They can make a better diagnosis than you can. Youll be wondering why you were worried after youve been,
 
 
 
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