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    Is it possible for them to retract my offer if I try and negotiate and how do I go about negotiating in the first instance?

    The position is quite a junior position but I've had about 1 to 2 years working experience.
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    (Original post by lottiew_)
    Is it possible for them to retract my offer if I try and negotiate and how do I go about negotiating in the first instance?

    The position is quite a junior position but I've had about 1 to 2 years working experience.
    You kindly ask them can we talk about this?
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    (Original post by thefatone)
    You kindly ask them can we talk about this?
    Have you been in that position before? if so, how did it go down?
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    (Original post by lottiew_)
    Is it possible for them to retract my offer if I try and negotiate and how do I go about negotiating in the first instance?

    The position is quite a junior position but I've had about 1 to 2 years working experience.
    I negotiated salary rises before I started jobs before.

    In both cases I said I had another offer just above what I hoped to get increased to but that I would willing to accept the figure I wanted because I really would prefer this role.

    How much more money do you want?

    Do not sign any contract until you've sorted it out though.
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    Say something like, I was really pleased to receive your offer but honestly with my experience I was expecting it to be a bit higher. Is this something you'd be willing to discuss?

    They could take back an offer, although unless you come in and say something stupid like I don't get out of bed for less than 100k they won't hold it against you. My general rule is that it doesn't hurt to ask, and if you don't ask you don't get.
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    'well you are just a bourgeoise pig who exploits my surplus labour aren't u, so can u quit being greedy and give me some of it back or i'll start a proletarian revolution'

    works everytime
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    What was the salary advertised at? Is your expectation significantly higher than this salary?


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    (Original post by lottiew_)
    Have you been in that position before? if so, how did it go down?
    I haven't however trying to give best advice i can.

    i'm only 17 ._.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    What was the salary advertised at? Is your expectation significantly higher than this salary?


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    They didn't initially advertise the salary. I'm trying to get about 2 to 3k more than what they offered me.
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    (Original post by lottiew_)
    They didn't initially advertise the salary. I'm trying to get about 2 to 3k more than what they offered me.
    As a percentage what is that 2-3k more? If salary has never been advertised or discussed in the interview then you have some ability to try and negotiate.

    When considering the offer, find out when the next salary review is due to take place of you were to join. It could quite easily be 3-6 months away, and if you prove your worth might get a salary increase then. If it's not going to be for another 12-18 months, then you might want to consider negotiating harder.


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    (Original post by thefatone)
    I haven't however trying to give best advice i can.

    i'm only 17 ._.
    If you are 17, I suspect your 1-2 years work experience is likely to either be 1) part-time or 2) not directly related to the type of work you will be doing.

    Also asking for a £2-3k increase in salary in a role that is that junior is likely to beyond their expectations.

    When I dealt with salary negotiations, a £2-3k increase in salary offer was only really considered with jobs that were paying high £20ks or low £30ks (or above).

    Have you not had this conversation already with the potential employer? Waiting over a week is pretty risky. If you want to have these discussions, it is best to have them fairly promptly.
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    (Original post by lottiew_)
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    Agree with J-SP you are probably on a hiding to nothing here and yes, they can withdraw your offer.

    You have to have a very well prepared argument as to why your work is worth more than they have budgeted for, why it is of more value to the company than workers in the same role, and why it is of more value to them that other people that have been working there longer. That's a pretty tall order if you don't have a very specific and hard to find skill set. If you just want more money or feel you are worth more, you'll start off on a very bad footing with the organisation.
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    JSP unless ive missed soemthing the OP isnt the fat one, so the OP isnt saying they are 17.

    OP you have had good and relevant advice above. If no salary was advertised and its below what you expected you cna broach the matter with them. You cannot overplay your hand though and you need to know what your reaction will be if they say no i.e walk away.

    It can be a negotiation, but i'd check what other jobs pay, so you need to be able to justify what you are asking for. Work out what your barganing power is.
    If its below market rate, then be prepared to walk away. If its on market rate, then you need to show you are worth the extra. As JSP pointed out it will depend on how much you want v how much they want you,. Be diplomatic and dont overplay yoir hand.
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    Do you think it would be risky to mention that I have another offer from elsewhere that wants to pay me higher?
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    [QUOTE=999tigger;64595273]JSP unless ive missed soemthing the OP isnt the fat one, so the OP isnt saying they are 17.QUOTE]

    Clearly haven't had enough caffeine this morning
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    (Original post by lottiew_)
    Do you think it would be risky to mention that I have another offer from elsewhere that wants to pay me higher?
    Do you actually have another offer of a higher amount? If so, and money is a key motivator, why are you not considering that offer?

    Yes - when negotiating some people will have other job offers and will state they have been offered a high salary and see if there is a way for the salary to be increased. However it is still risky.

    I have had this happen several times when I have been recruiting for my team and its made me realise that sometimes:

    1) I actually don't want to hire that person anymore because I think there is going to be a strong chance they will leave early on in their career. I suspect that they will be problematic when it comes to salary reviews, bonuses etc because their salary expectations are already at the top end of the salary band and therefore they are going to be limited in what increases I can give them in the future. This means they will jump ship as soon as they get a better offer elsewhere

    2) I have had a second candidate who was equally as good who I suspect will be happy on the salary offered. I could only offer one candidate and felt that if the first were likely to decline, there was always the second person as a backup.

    I generally have only given salary increases to someone at the offer stage if I thought they were exceptional. Even then I have to think very carefully about the salary I give and how this fits into the pay structure of the wider team and even organisation. Its not as easy as just giving in to people and give them what they want. For those who do want an increase in salary and you can't give it to them, there are often ways that you can potentially tackle this - e.g. a salary review at the end of their probation period, explaining the wider benefits you get (for a salary of approx. £25k, even three days extra holiday is worth about £300-350, private health care etc), explaining when they would be entitled to a bonus etc.

    My advice is don't just look at the headline starting salary figure. Work out the true value of your employment package and understand when is the earliest you may get a salary review/increase before deciding. You won't know this until you speak to them though!
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    When you get good at your job and have figures to back it up it's much easier to negotiate that salary. Hell, I know someone in sales who came first in their region in healthcare products who was headhunted and told at the interview "so, what do you want"? Obviously there is a ceiling as to what they can offer unless you decide to go into management but this sort of thing can be used as leverage especially if it's another company trying to poach you. However, mostly money is not the motivator for many people and they would rather negotiate a better bonus conditional on them achieving certain things, which seems to suit companies in that particular industry a bit more as well because it's not set in stone
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    (Original post by lottiew_)
    Is it possible for them to retract my offer if I try and negotiate and how do I go about negotiating in the first instance?

    The position is quite a junior position but I've had about 1 to 2 years working experience.
    I'm in that situation, have over a year of experience but recently started my new job which means I'm on probation, but they say they'll give me a pay rise in 2 months because of my 'excellent' performance.

    In most jobs they do offer a starting salary first and then give you a pay rise once your probation period is over, but obviously on the condition that you are good performer. This happened to me on my first job. But depending on the company I don't know if this is the culture.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    If you are 17, I suspect your 1-2 years work experience is likely to either be 1) part-time or 2) not directly related to the type of work you will be doing.

    Also asking for a £2-3k increase in salary in a role that is that junior is likely to beyond their expectations.

    When I dealt with salary negotiations, a £2-3k increase in salary offer was only really considered with jobs that were paying high £20ks or low £30ks (or above).

    Have you not had this conversation already with the potential employer? Waiting over a week is pretty risky. If you want to have these discussions, it is best to have them fairly promptly.
    I wish i even had a job, even it was poorly paid, i really want to earn something but no-one will take me in :/
 
 
 
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