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    I'm confused by two copies of the same text. In the Introducing Cicero book by the Scottish Classics Group, the Brilliance of Pompey section (number 7), lines 89-90 contains the phrase 'mixtum ex civibus atque ex bellicosissimis nationibus', which it translates as 'in which citizesn and the most warlike tribes combined against us' (not literal translation, but the one which it provides on the side for some phrases).

    However, in the Cicero De Imperio book edited by C. MacDonald, the same area (section 28, line 30) does not contain this phrase.

    Can anyone provide an explanation?
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    I'm also currently studying Cicero's De Imperio but haven't seen that phrase in my text. Maybe it's a variation in translation? Or sometimes the Latin itself has to be supplied due to the corruption of the original texts
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    (Original post by MCPClark)
    I'm also currently studying Cicero's De Imperio but haven't seen that phrase in my text. Maybe it's a variation in translation? Or sometimes the Latin itself has to be supplied due to the corruption of the original texts
    My tutor was unable to provide an explanation either. For the purposes of the exam, though, he said I should use the Cicero: De Imperio text.

    In the 'Notes for the Student' section in the beginning of the Introducing Cicero book, it says that 'in this book, we offer a selection of relatively short excerpts from Cicero's speeches, letters and philosophical writings'. This suggests that they are copying it directly from the original. The cover of the book says 'Prepared by the Scottish Classics Group'. Maybe the 'prepared' word is significant? (I don't think so in this case, but I'm not sure, just providing any potentially relevant information.)

    The Cicero: De Imperio text is 'Edited by C. MacDonald', so maybe in the editing they cut it out for some reason (implausible in my opinion. In the preface it says that 'This edition aims at providing the essential background information for an intelligent reading of the text', which suggests that they might have cut things out, but it is doubtful that it is referring to that due to the fact that he then goes on to talk about notes and how he's trying not to do the pupil's work for him.
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    I'm also studying De Imperio and haven't seen it either. I would recommend to go with the book set by the exam board as that'll be what they base the mark schemes on I'd imagine.


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    (Original post by veritysnow98)
    I'm also studying De Imperio and haven't seen it either. I would recommend to go with the book set by the exam board as that'll be what they base the mark schemes on I'd imagine.


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    Yeah, that's probably the way to go. Can't help wondering, but I'll do detailed enquiry about it later.
 
 
 
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