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    Hi Guys

    I've started working my way through MST124 which I'll need if I go through with my plan to do the Nat Sci Physics degree later this year. The trouble is I'm finding it more challenging than I expected.Obviously its crucial that I nail the maths in order to get anywhere with a physics degree.

    I didn't expect it to be easy as I never took my maths GCSE's, but I thought I'd get further before having trouble.

    I'm currently only up to Activity 13 in Algebra and already it seems to be taking me longer and longer to complete the activity without many re try's.

    Can anyone give any advise at all?

    Thanks
    Dave
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    (Original post by Davew3000)
    Hi Guys

    I've started working my way through MST124 which I'll need if I go through with my plan to do the Nat Sci Physics degree later this year. The trouble is I'm finding it more challenging than I expected.Obviously its crucial that I nail the maths in order to get anywhere with a physics degree.

    I didn't expect it to be easy as I never took my maths GCSE's, but I thought I'd get further before having trouble.

    I'm currently only up to Activity 13 in Algebra and already it seems to be taking me longer and longer to complete the activity without many re try's.

    Can anyone give any advise at all?

    Thanks
    Dave
    I don't know exactly what is included, nor do I study with the OU. However, my understanding is that those early modules cover mostly A level topics. That said, have you tried watching videos that explain how to do certain things on youtube/examsolutions etc. to see if that helps?
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    (Original post by ByronicHero)
    I don't know exactly what is included, nor do I study with the OU. However, my understanding is that those early modules cover mostly A level topics. That said, have you tried watching videos that explain how to do certain things on youtube/examsolutions etc. to see if that helps?
    Thanks for your reply!

    Yes I have and the videos on Khan academy have been a great help.

    It just seems that the progress is exceptionally slow (not that I really have a comparison)

    I suppose i'm just a bit concerned to be struggling this early on.

    Do you have a background in maths? Do you think its a case of the more one learns the better they get at learning?
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    Haha thanks for the reassuring words and I hope your metaphor is the case, I shall do as you recommend and keep plugging away at it.

    I think in truth I have thrown myself into this head first and just expected to be able to pick it all up with relative ease. That for me is usually a good move and gets things done.

    On this occasion I think I need to allow time to acclimatize to this new way of thinking/ studying.

    Thank you again and good luck with your study en-devours :-)
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    (Original post by Davew3000)
    Do you have a background in maths? Do you think its a case of the more one learns the better they get at learning?
    It is all very different for different people but the more maths you do the better you get at it and the more you study the better you should study if you are paying attention to what works best for you.

    If you haven't done much maths before it sounds like you are doing really well. A lot of algebra is learned by doing questions and finding out which mistakes you make repeatedly and trying to fix them. Messing up those questions and getting things wrong are totally part of the best way to learn algebra as long as it doesn't get you down.
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    (Original post by sputum)
    It is all very different for different people but the more maths you do the better you get at it and the more you study the better you should study if you are paying attention to what works best for you.

    If you haven't done much maths before it sounds like you are doing really well. A lot of algebra is learned by doing questions and finding out which mistakes you make repeatedly and trying to fix them. Messing up those questions and getting things wrong are totally part of the best way to learn algebra as long as it doesn't get you down.
    Thanks for your reply!

    That's reassuring and I was hoping it would be the case. I just need to keep working away at it.

    Like you say maybe I am doing ok. It can be difficult to pace yourself when you want to reach a goal. Got to remind myself that this is a marathon and not a sprint.

    Thanks again :-)
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    if you never did maths GCSE then my (admittedly unhelpful at this stage) advice is that, if you didn't, you should have started with MU123

    otherwise, my advice is to work steadily at your own pace - ideally at least some time every day so you don't forget what you are building on - but whatever you do don't get behind
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    (Original post by Pariah)
    if you never did maths GCSE then my (admittedly unhelpful at this stage) advice is that, if you didn't, you should have started with MU123

    otherwise, my advice is to work steadily at your own pace - ideally at least some time every day so you don't forget what you are building on - but whatever you do don't get behind
    Thanks for your advice.

    Like you say it's maybe a bit late to go back to mst123, but as others have said maybe I am doing ok considering my lack of previous maths study.

    I won't start the degree until later this year so I've made it a priority to fit some maths study in everyday to prepare myself.

    Thanks again :-)
    Dave
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    The first thing that most people at the Open Uni would suggest is to study MU123 which is the "pre" MST124. But I advise against this. If you are completing the Natural Sciences degree then I'd advice getting fluent in your mathematics in another way. One way is always to purchase the MU123 material from eBay (I did). Or you can take the route I found most useful. Order a book called "Foundation Maths" and with it you get an access code to Pearson's online Math Lab. Now I've found this book on online access absolutely invaluable. Not only does the Foundation Maths book contain everything MU123 does, it contains beyond that. So don't worry you won't have to study it all. But it's the online MathLab that's the winner! It provides unlimited questions on the specific type of math your studying, and you can keep retrying as it will always be a different question every time, and you have unlimited quizzes, tests, etc. And it calculates where you're going wrong and provides you with exercises to improve. I believe you learn better when you repeat something. I studied math and worked through a book in a month and got everything correct. Went back to the beginning and I'd forgotten half of it. A year on with Math Lab and I still know it fresh even though I did it a year ago. I'll provide the link below:
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Foundation-...undation+maths

    Of course you can go to the Pearson's Math Lab website and purchase just the online aspect with included ebook for much left. But believe me its worth every penny
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    (Original post by mbch1809)
    The first thing that most people at the Open Uni would suggest is to study MU123 which is the "pre" MST124. But I advise against this. If you are completing the Natural Sciences degree then I'd advice getting fluent in your mathematics in another way. One way is always to purchase the MU123 material from eBay (I did). Or you can take the route I found most useful. Order a book called "Foundation Maths" and with it you get an access code to Pearson's online Math Lab. Now I've found this book on online access absolutely invaluable. Not only does the Foundation Maths book contain everything MU123 does, it contains beyond that. So don't worry you won't have to study it all. But it's the online MathLab that's the winner! It provides unlimited questions on the specific type of math your studying, and you can keep retrying as it will always be a different question every time, and you have unlimited quizzes, tests, etc. And it calculates where you're going wrong and provides you with exercises to improve. I believe you learn better when you repeat something. I studied math and worked through a book in a month and got everything correct. Went back to the beginning and I'd forgotten half of it. A year on with Math Lab and I still know it fresh even though I did it a year ago. I'll provide the link below:
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Foundation-...undation+maths

    Of course you can go to the Pearson's Math Lab website and purchase just the online aspect with included ebook for much left. But believe me its worth every penny
    Thank you very much for your reply!
    I'm very grateful for the advice, it sounds like the book along with the online mathlab will be invaluable to me.
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    I'm sure it was recommended by the Open University if I'm honest. But the Math Lab is pure genius!!!
 
 
 
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