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    Are you a mature student? How different do you think your study pattern is now compared to when you were younger?
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    Im 21 in college, tryna end up in uni. I wasnt the type to study in school so im having a bit of difficulty getting used to education again.


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    I'm 28. My study pattern isn't much different. I still work better under the pressure of a deadline. I'm a bit disorganised. But I value the opportunity so much more. I frittered it away at 16-19. And I have an end goal to motivate me now that's strong enough to do so.

    Having said that, I was a good student in school so I think some of it was moving from structured environment and not being mature enough to cope with it
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    (Original post by ~Tara~)
    I'm 28. My study pattern isn't much different. I still work better under the pressure of a deadline. I'm a bit disorganised. But I value the opportunity so much more. I frittered it away at 16-19. And I have an end goal to motivate me now that's strong enough to do so.

    Having said that, I was a good student in school so I think some of it was moving from structured environment and not being mature enough to cope with it
    Hi Tara,

    would you believe that your experience and knowledge will help you to get good result?

    thanks
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    I think learning to think analytically helps me more than either of those really and I learnt that on a very personal recovery journey. So I guess you could say knowledge and experience. I'd say that my experiences have taught me how to apply my knowledge.
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    I'm 24, didn't study at school, and when I was working I always worked to a last minute deadline. Now I'm at uni I like to get coursework/lab reports done ASAP, but I'm still terrible at planning exam revision. I'm actually procrastinating by being on here right now! The difference now is that I love what I do, plus I see my friends missing nights out because they have deadlines, whereas I've realised if I start early and want to go on a night out I still can.
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    (Original post by Study Inn Group)
    Are you a mature student? Howdifferent do you think your study pattern is now compared to when you wereyounger?
    Mine is much more different now. Years of work experience have improved my concentration, organisation and confidence In my ability considerably. So much so, that my classmates find it hard to believe that I struggled at school when I was younger.

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    I'm 26. When I was 18-22 I was a reading monster. Now I find it harder to concentrate for large spans of time. I also need my 8 hour sleep and cannot think clearly if I'm tired.

    But I think I'm happier
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    I'm 32 - in school i just didn't bother doing a lot of study, my coursework was always left till the last min and then i'd just scrape a pass or even fail it, and my GCSE exams i didn't even take seriously. I left school with 4 GCSE's and a BTEC after sticking 6th forms for a year, however after 14 years out of education and drifting from job to job (I've literally had about 100 jobs because i felt that nothing ever suited me) I went back and did an access course (social sciences) and am now finishing up my first year on a psychology degree. My study pattern now is totally different, although i do leave stuff late, i do a lot more reading and engage with the subjects more as I'm interested in them, whereas in school i wasn't interested or bothered by them.
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    I'm 31. I graduated in 2014 but I'm currently doing distance learning and hoping to do post grad in the near future. When I was younger I didn't really bother studying as I was lazy and didn't like school (it was an all girls so an extremely *****y environment which I didn't feel comfortable in). I did manage to do OK on my GCSEs although I look back and wish I'd put more effort in. I take studying more seriously now and actually enjoy it as I'm doing subjects which I'm interested in although I can still be a bit lazy on occasion.

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    Vastly different. School was too good to be squandered on education! Procrastination ruled, followed by last minute cramming.

    With maturity and experience comes the discipline to plan and pace workloads. This together with motivation, because education and studying have become a personal choice and pleasure, not something forced onto me by pushy parents or societal pressure to conform.

    It's about attitude and motivation first and the experience of knowing how to plan and execute those plans for success.
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    I left school in 1963 aged 15. Brought up in the care system of the 50s and 60's. Formal education in care was practically non-existent.
    I'm 68 now and just completing my 1st year at university studying Criminology.
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    (Original post by Seamus123)
    I left school in 1963 aged 15. Brought up in the care system of the 50s and 60's. Formal education in care was practically non-existent.
    I'm 68 now and just completing my 1st year at university studying Criminology.
    Absolutely brilliant or as they say, king mustard! Good for you.
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    (Original post by welshjoel)
    I'm 32 - in school i just didn't bother doing a lot of study, my coursework was always left till the last min and then i'd just scrape a pass or even fail it, and my GCSE exams i didn't even take seriously. I left school with 4 GCSE's and a BTEC after sticking 6th forms for a year, however after 14 years out of education and drifting from job to job (I've literally had about 100 jobs because i felt that nothing ever suited me) I went back and did an access course (social sciences) and am now finishing up my first year on a psychology degree. My study pattern now is totally different, although i do leave stuff late, i do a lot more reading and engage with the subjects more as I'm interested in them, whereas in school i wasn't interested or bothered by them.
    Hi! I am also thinking of doing an access. Where did you do yours? How did you find it? I can't decide whether I should do an access course or a couple of A levels in one year (I already have one A-level.) I'm 21 by the way. Also where did you do your psychology degree? Was it easy to find a University that accepted someone with an access course? Thanks!
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    (Original post by roro1609)
    Hi! I am also thinking of doing an access. Where did you do yours? How did you find it? I can't decide whether I should do an access course or a couple of A levels in one year (I already have one A-level.) I'm 21 by the way. Also where did you do your psychology degree? Was it easy to find a University that accepted someone with an access course? Thanks!
    I did my access course at University of South Wales in Newport, i found it really helped my get ready for uni life, it taught me about referencing, structuring assignments, deadlines, and other academic skills that you need to use in uni. I went to an open day and because i had been out of education for so long was advised to do an access course. The course itself was mixed with people on a foundation degree course, I found that their workload wasn't as hectic as people on the access course, but by doing the foundation you are tied into staying with that university and as i wanted to do psychology degree somewhere else i opted for an access course ( if you know what degree you want to do then see if they offer a foundation year with it). With regards to getting into uni with an access course, i found it fine, i had 4 out of 5 choices come back with an offer and i think most uni's are fine to take people off an access course providing they get the required grades, some uni's will require students to achieve a certain amount of pass, merits and distinctions. I didn't really know that much about A levels as I was 30 when i went back, but i think that they take 2 years to complete, where an access/foundation course only take a year each. All this info might be different though as I'm welsh and applied for welsh uni's - i did read somewhere that funding/finance is totally different in other parts of the uk.

    Hope this helps

    Joel
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    (Original post by welshjoel)
    I did my access course at University of South Wales in Newport, i found it really helped my get ready for uni life, it taught me about referencing, structuring assignments, deadlines, and other academic skills that you need to use in uni. I went to an open day and because i had been out of education for so long was advised to do an access course. The course itself was mixed with people on a foundation degree course, I found that their workload wasn't as hectic as people on the access course, but by doing the foundation you are tied into staying with that university and as i wanted to do psychology degree somewhere else i opted for an access course ( if you know what degree you want to do then see if they offer a foundation year with it). With regards to getting into uni with an access course, i found it fine, i had 4 out of 5 choices come back with an offer and i think most uni's are fine to take people off an access course providing they get the required grades, some uni's will require students to achieve a certain amount of pass, merits and distinctions. I didn't really know that much about A levels as I was 30 when i went back, but i think that they take 2 years to complete, where an access/foundation course only take a year each. All this info might be different though as I'm welsh and applied for welsh uni's - i did read somewhere that funding/finance is totally different in other parts of the uk.

    Hope this helps

    Joel
    Thank you very much for this Joel, very helpful!
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    Nearly finished my access course this year. It's been a rough journey, but we are close to finish now. I'll be 24 when I go to University. I'm excited and a bit nervous about how I'll be perceived as an older student. I'm not a massive partier these days, alcohol makes me sleepy HAHA
 
 
 
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