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    Stressing over a cut/ food obsession
    Basically im wanting to cut for my summer holiday. Have started to count calories and its becoming obsessive as im noting every single thing i eat down and excluding myself socially e.g not having dinner with the family as whats made doesnt fit with my cut or not going out with friends as they are enjoying a drink or meal. All of this is making me lonely and stressed and food obsessed which can result in binging and then i feel as if ive failed. Summer is just around the corner and im always going round in circles back to square one. 6ft 1 and 168 lbs! ( do lots of exercise and lift 3x a week)


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    Stop counting

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    (Original post by Angry cucumber)
    Stop counting

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    Why cucumber


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    (Original post by Kyle98)
    Why cucumber


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    Counting calories is ruining your life. You're not the personality type for this style of eating. So stop!

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    How many calories are you on currently and how much weight are you losing on average per week Kyle98?
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    You're light for 6'1, which would indicate you won't have much muscle to show even if you were to get down to a low body fat percentage.

    Given that you aren't enjoying your diet and it probably won't be worth it, I would stop what you're doing.

    You'll probably look better with a bit more muscle on you, than less fat, unless you're carrying mostly fat now that is.
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    Hi there

    I'm sorry that this is making you feel so anxious. My best advice would really be to talk to somebody about it. Usually the roots of these things can be found in things other than food. Also, our brains are wired to think about and react to food in certain ways - and when you diet or count calories, you are effectively telling your body that there is a famine of some kind. Your body will then respond by trying to get you to eat a lot when there is food (binging) and will adapt to keep the weight on. You might find it helpful to think about why you wanted to lose weight in the first place? And why it is manifesting itself in obsessive behaviour?

    Both binging and restricting (counting calories) can be truly horrible psychologically. Neither one of them is the better of the two. You might feel that binging is worse, as it does lead to weight gain, but both can be categorised as "disordered eating". Take note however, that I am not saying you have an eating disorder, just that you may have disordered patterns of eating, and that these can have a very negative effect on your overall well being.

    Talking to someone about it is really the best thing you can do. It is helpful to explain your fears surrounding food and why you feel it might be necessary to lose weight / count calories to the extent that the amount of time you spend on it is unhealthy.

    Good luck!
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    (Original post by clockworkbella)
    Hi there

    I'm sorry that this is making you feel so anxious. My best advice would really be to talk to somebody about it. Usually the roots of these things can be found in things other than food. Also, our brains are wired to think about and react to food in certain ways - and when you diet or count calories, you are effectively telling your body that there is a famine of some kind. Your body will then respond by trying to get you to eat a lot when there is food (binging) and will adapt to keep the weight on. You might find it helpful to think about why you wanted to lose weight in the first place? And why it is manifesting itself in obsessive behaviour?

    Both binging and restricting (counting calories) can be truly horrible psychologically. Neither one of them is the better of the two. You might feel that binging is worse, as it does lead to weight gain, but both can be categorised as "disordered eating". Take note however, that I am not saying you have an eating disorder, just that you may have disordered patterns of eating, and that these can have a very negative effect on your overall well being.

    Talking to someone about it is really the best thing you can do. It is helpful to explain your fears surrounding food and why you feel it might be necessary to lose weight / count calories to the extent that the amount of time you spend on it is unhealthy.

    Good luck!
    Do you mind if i message you privately asking something? Think it would be helpful!


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    (Original post by Kyle98)
    Do you mind if i message you privately asking something? Think it would be helpful!


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    You are welcome to
 
 
 
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