School Sixth Form or Sixth Form College? Watch

blooptop
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(I'm starting this thread because the others on this subject are a few years old)

Given the choice between attending the sixth form attached to a prestigious school or a well-performing sixth form college exclusively for 16-19 education, provided the same subjects were offered, which would you advise someone to go for?

Extra questions in regards to a couple of major points about stand-alone sixth form education:

1) Is the freedom given to you a good, bad or mixed thing? How does the chance of slacking your work if left to your own devices weigh up against the independance of the set-up, in your opinion or experience?

2) Do you find that the teachers are less organised or enthusiastic than adjoined sixth form teachers, or are they more experienced in teaching their subject at an advanced level and at helping older students?

Thank you in advance
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Leafy leafy
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My experience with a sixth form that is linked with a school is not too good, mainly because the whole idea of being in sixth form is like entering a maturer stage of life, but when your still at an establishment filled with younger children it kinda ruins that. it can be pretty hard to get around the school when you're path is constantly blocked haha. Another thing which might not be relevant but I've found at my sixth form the teachers find it hard to see us as maturer students as they are used to dealing with younger children and we get treated in the same way.

1) the freedom can be a good thing if you use the time wisely. This can be hard to do but you'll benefit greatly if you use the free time to get work done, just treat free periods like study periods. Also frees can be great when your feeling stressed and just need some time to chill between lessons.

2) kinda answered this above, but a relevant point is that at a sixth form college the teachers have significantly less students most of the time, meaning it is easier for them to keep tabs on how you're achieving. They also have more time to communicate with you.
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Drunq
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(Original post by blooptop)
(I'm starting this thread because the others on this subject are a few years old)

Given the choice between attending the sixth form attached to a prestigious school or a well-performing sixth form college exclusively for 16-19 education, provided the same subjects were offered, which would you advise someone to go for?

Extra questions in regards to a couple of major points about stand-alone sixth form education:

1) Is the freedom given to you a good, bad or mixed thing? How does the chance of slacking your work if left to your own devices weigh up against the independance of the set-up, in your opinion or experience?

2) Do you find that the teachers are less organised or enthusiastic than adjoined sixth form teachers, or are they more experienced in teaching their subject at an advanced level and at helping older students?

Thank you in advance
I've been to both. This is a hard question, however everyone has their own opinion, people who usually go school sixth form have no clue how it compares to college sixth form, and they always think it's better; and the main reason for that is because people who fail usually go college, right?

However it's different from that. You can get to whatever university you intend to going to college or school. I think that college you have a lot more independence which prepares you for university. Whereas schools are a lot stricter in making you do your work, forcing you to come in for the whole day. When you go to university, they don't give a flying cows if you come in or not because you are paying the £9k, and it's kind of similar to college, you can choose not to come in, and they go a lot easier than you than school, where in comparison you may be kicked out the course.

entirely it comes down to you if you are any of these things go to college:

- Independent and disciplined to do your work when it needs to be done
- Will manage your time wisely
- Will attend college even if you have one lesson during that day

If you are any of these things go to school:

- Lazy, and require more help to remain your attendance
- Come in everyday from the morning to the afternoon
- Being forced to study during your free periods

Good luck making your choice. However I think college is a lot more better, and that's my opinion, I didn't like being forced to study when I was tired and couldn't manage anything. Got a few meetings at school for attendance for legitimate reasons. Whereas going to college made me manage my time better, get work done on a basis I liked, and I got the support I needed with my teachers.

Good Luck picking.
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blooptop
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(Original post by Drunq)
I've been to both. This is a hard question, however everyone has their own opinion, people who usually go school sixth form have no clue how it compares to college sixth form, and they always think it's better; and the main reason for that is because people who fail usually go college, right?

However it's different from that. You can get to whatever university you intend to going to college or school. I think that college you have a lot more independence which prepares you for university. Whereas schools are a lot stricter in making you do your work, forcing you to come in for the whole day. When you go to university, they don't give a flying cows if you come in or not because you are paying the £9k, and it's kind of similar to college, you can choose not to come in, and they go a lot easier than you than school, where in comparison you may be kicked out the course.

entirely it comes down to you if you are any of these things go to college:

- Independent and disciplined to do your work when it needs to be done
- Will manage your time wisely
- Will attend college even if you have one lesson during that day

If you are any of these things go to school:

- Lazy, and require more help to remain your attendance
- Come in everyday from the morning to the afternoon
- Being forced to study during your free periods

Good luck making your choice. However I think college is a lot more better, and that's my opinion, I didn't like being forced to study when I was tired and couldn't manage anything. Got a few meetings at school for attendance for legitimate reasons. Whereas going to college made me manage my time better, get work done on a basis I liked, and I got the support I needed with my teachers.

Good Luck picking.
Thank you for your wonderful and informative reply!

I actually went to a school sixth form for the first term of this year, but I also had problems with attendance. I'm discovering that being *told* what to do really doesn't help me get anything done, and that I'm much happier doing things by my own steam, so the scales are tipping in favour of the college, especially after seeing how friendly it is I just have to get over that idea of only people who fail go from school sixth form > sixth form college, and worrying that my friends will see it that way too :P
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blooptop
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(Original post by Leafy leafy)
My experience with a sixth form that is linked with a school is not too good, mainly because the whole idea of being in sixth form is like entering a maturer stage of life, but when your still at an establishment filled with younger children it kinda ruins that. it can be pretty hard to get around the school when you're path is constantly blocked haha. Another thing which might not be relevant but I've found at my sixth form the teachers find it hard to see us as maturer students as they are used to dealing with younger children and we get treated in the same way.

1) the freedom can be a good thing if you use the time wisely. This can be hard to do but you'll benefit greatly if you use the free time to get work done, just treat free periods like study periods. Also frees can be great when your feeling stressed and just need some time to chill between lessons.

2) kinda answered this above, but a relevant point is that at a sixth form college the teachers have significantly less students most of the time, meaning it is easier for them to keep tabs on how you're achieving. They also have more time to communicate with you.

Yeah, I'm getting the vibe that sixth form college is set up more like a university, and learning to study independently can only really help anyone planning to go on to higher education :]

Thank you for your answer!
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Drunq
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(Original post by blooptop)
Thank you for your wonderful and informative reply!

I actually went to a school sixth form for the first term of this year, but I also had problems with attendance. I'm discovering that being *told* what to do really doesn't help me get anything done, and that I'm much happier doing things by my own steam, so the scales are tipping in favour of the college, especially after seeing how friendly it is I just have to get over that idea of only people who fail go from school sixth form > sixth form college, and worrying that my friends will see it that way too :P
It shouldn't be seen that way. People who go college for a levels have their own benefits, and it isn't for stupid people. However you got to stay on top of your own work and it prepares you better for university.

People who think it is for people who are less capable of achieving good grades, have never been to a sixth form college, or lack the information to back up their answer. Because most people who go to college either do Level 2 resits (GCSE or BTEC) and very few of the students do level 3 courses (A-Level or BTEC).

If you do not like exams, I suggest you take 2 A-Levels and a BTEC e.g science which includes biology and chemistry. This will prepare you better for university too, and far less exams. And guess what? You can still go to Russel Group universities?! That is if you get the required a-level grades and D*'s in your BTEC.

* Make sure if you do take 2 A-Levels and a BTEC, that the BTEC is level 3.
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bakedbeans247
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I went to a sixth-form college. Way more freedom than secondary school, which I really liked. However, you got to be careful, because that extra freedom/time at home could wreck ya too if you always use it for non school related work and don't balance it out - i should know . Loved coming home early when I didn't have last periods and the fact that I only go school if there are lessons, plus I had no form-time the 2nd year and no assemblies at all the whole 2 years. Heck at-least a couple days a month i'd be coming home like 3-4 hours earlier than expected. Where as my brother who went to a secondary sixth form also had a fixed time to come home like we did during secondary school. My friend, who started uni this year, says it feels just like sixth form college but instead he lives there and the work load is way more. Oh and plus going do a sfc rather than your own school means you'll meet new people and most likely make a bunch of new friends god willing. Don't knw if it's just my sfc but everyone seemed really nice and friendly (though speaking i only studied the sciences and maths)
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