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Plagiarism - writing essay in exam conditions watch

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    Hi.

    I am clear on the rules regarding plagiarism when it involves coursework like assignments you hand in.

    However regarding essays in actual exam conditions that we have to write, can you still get 'done' for plagiarism? It's obviously a lot more difficult to reference in exam conditions as so many possible questions could come up so it's nearly impossible to remember all the names of studies and theories. It's also easy to incorporate notes (word for word) into the essay in the exam as you're under a lot more pressure and rushed so write down anything you remember which can make it look like plagiarism.

    This is for Psychology by the way if that helps.

    Thanks
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    (Original post by Juuuuh)
    Hi.

    I am clear on the rules regarding plagiarism when it involves coursework like assignments you hand in.

    However regarding essays in actual exam conditions that we have to write, can you still get 'done' for plagiarism? It's obviously a lot more difficult to reference in exam conditions as so many possible questions could come up so it's nearly impossible to remember all the names of studies and theories. It's also easy to incorporate notes (word for word) into the essay in the exam as you're under a lot more pressure and rushed so write down anything you remember which can make it look like plagiarism.

    This is for Psychology by the way if that helps.

    Thanks
    Yes plagiarism can occur in exams, check your uni guidelines.
    Obviously as it's handwritten and from memory it's much harder.
    If you accidentally misquote a few things you will be fine though - I'm almost certain I've done it a few times. If you can't remember a source, perhaps just take a guess, getting it wrong is better than quote with none. Ideas would be almost impossible to attribute.
    It's likely more relevant for people who can memorize entire pages of stuff and would quote with no source. Plus the examiner would need to explicitly recognise it themselves.
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    I've never referenced anything in an exam, although I've occasionally been able to say something like "Smith proposed that..." I was told that references might be a good way to get extra percentages, but we weren't penalised for not referencing and not attributing every concept we used in our answers.

    I wouldn't worry about it. You'd need a eidetic memory to reference an exam essay and that isn't expected.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    I wouldn't worry about it. You'd need a eidetic memory to reference an exam essay and that isn't expected.
    I always provided some references for for essay exams and I certainly don't have an eidetic memory, it's not hard to learn a few major theories for each topic and a name/date.

    OP you could plagiarise in theory but it would be hard to do. You won't be penalised for not remembering a reference or getting it wrong and you're very unlikely to copy anything word for word as remembering it perfectly would be impressive!
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    As inazuma said you need to check your Uni guidelines. It is possible to do it in exams.
    This is from Cambridge

    Plagiarism in invigilated examinations
    Collusion (perhaps by candidates exchanging notes) is extremely rare in invigilated examinations. This is clearly an offence which would be reported immediately to the Proctors. The most common forms of plagiarism in invigilated exams are:
    Reproducing material committed to memory
    • Overview: some candidates are able to learn many pages of text by heart. Those brought up with rote learning often don't realise that reproducing such material in a written examination constitutes plagiarism if it is reproduced without attribution. In technical subjects this might be described as 'bookwork' and be perfectly acceptable. In other subjects, Examiners may regard this as plagiarism.
    • Suggestions for staff and examiners: local guidance should make it clear that plagiarism can occur in written examinations and explain how candidates should acknowledge sources in such examinations. Examiners are strongly advised to include an appropriate rubric on the front pages of examination papers.
    Copying from provided reference material
    • Overview: reference material is provided in many invigilated examinations and conventions for using such material vary by subject.
    • Suggestions for staff and examiners: local guidance and the rubric should clarify what is permitted: in the absence of such guidance candidates may justifiably feel able to copy anything from the provided material without attribution.
    Copying from material legitimately taken into the examination room
    • Overview: in some invigilated examinations candidates are permitted to bring in books which they have indexed and annotated.
    • Suggestions for staff and examiners: local guidance should clarify what is and what is not permitted. Phrases such as 'a reasonable amount of annotation' are readily misinterpreted.


    I bet its quite rare tbh, but maybe ask your tutor for some guidance.
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    Do you do bibliography in exam essays or do you only do in text refrence like smith (2013)
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    (Original post by goldNwhite)
    Do you do bibliography in exam essays or do you only do in text refrence like smith (2013)
    God no lol, just a name will suffice. Year is ideal but not necessary, I CBA personally.
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    Imo the only thing to worry about is using someone elses idea as your own. the other danger is if you have a phoographic memory and you just repeat an essay answer from elsewhere. If thats picked up on that could cause trouble. You need to look at your uni policy and its easier to plaigarise in some subjects over others.
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    (Original post by Juuuuh)
    Hi.

    I am clear on the rules regarding plagiarism when it involves coursework like assignments you hand in.

    However regarding essays in actual exam conditions that we have to write, can you still get 'done' for plagiarism? It's obviously a lot more difficult to reference in exam conditions as so many possible questions could come up so it's nearly impossible to remember all the names of studies and theories. It's also easy to incorporate notes (word for word) into the essay in the exam as you're under a lot more pressure and rushed so write down anything you remember which can make it look like plagiarism.

    This is for Psychology by the way if that helps.

    Thanks
    It should be quite difficult to plagiarise in an exam essay - at least by accident. It is unlikely that you will write verbatim quotes (and it's best to avoid that) but you should be able to refer to key writers who have developed major theories or who have defended key arguments or points of view if you are writing about them.

    So you can formulate an argument or present a point of view in your own words, but you can say generally something along the lines of "as argued by so and so" or "this approach was developed by so and so" etc. You don't even need to refer to their actual works or papers - their names would be more than enough.
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    (Original post by Inazuma)
    Yes plagiarism can occur in exams, check your uni guidelines.
    Obviously as it's handwritten and from memory it's much harder.
    If you accidentally misquote a few things you will be fine though - I'm almost certain I've done it a few times. If you can't remember a source, perhaps just take a guess, getting it wrong is better than quote with none. Ideas would be almost impossible to attribute.
    It's likely more relevant for people who can memorize entire pages of stuff and would quote with no source. Plus the examiner would need to explicitly recognise it themselves.
    Ah, do you think it is better if in the situation I had a quote that I remembered someone had said and made up a name rather than make out that I came up with it? I guess a made up name is better than nothing, (Smith) or (Brown) usually works haha
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    (Original post by Juuuuh)
    Ah, do you think it is better if in the situation I had a quote that I remembered someone had said and made up a name rather than make out that I came up with it? I guess a made up name is better than nothing, (Smith) or (Brown) usually works haha
    Might have done it before with law cases Just picked a random case name.
    Or with an idea, I've used the textbook author before as usually they've said something similar....
    But yes, better look like you remembered wrong than that you're deliberately misleading by leaving names out and that you've come up with it. They wouldn't be terribly fussed if it's accidental forgetfulness. It's really the deliberate stuff they'll be concerned with.
 
 
 

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