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Warwick vs Durham. Hit me with everything you've got. watch

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    Which produces graduates that end up being successful?

    Which has more serious people?

    Which has more ambitious people?

    Which is full of people there just for the partying?

    Which helps student projects more?

    Which has better links to industries?

    Which makes it easier to switch courses? (Important for me because I no longer want to do the sub-course I applied for in either)

    I want to open an engineering / tech startup and I'm applying to physics so that I can be well versed in science in general, and understand everything that my business does.

    So I am looking for a university with people I can do something crazily ambitious with, and receive potential help from the university for our projects, and give us more freedom to work on things ourselves than be forced into a rigid structure and find employment / internships.

    Give me all of the ugly truth you have (but make sure it's actually true). Hit me.
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    Warwick Warwick Warwick Neither durham Warwick warwick

    Imperial's better though.
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    (Original post by LibertyMan)
    Which produces graduates that end up being successful? Both will have lots of successful graduates

    Which has more serious people? No way of knowing

    Which has more ambitious people? Both will have lots of ambitious people same as all unis

    Which is full of people there just for the partying? Both, you will find this wherever you go, just dont make friends with them if you dont want to

    Which helps student projects more? no way of telling as most people wont of studied at both and depending on the scenario is more reliant on the lecturer than the uni for project support

    Which has better links to industries? no idea, guess it depends on what industry

    Which makes it easier to switch courses? (Important for me because I no longer want to do the sub-course I applied for in either) no one can say, you will have to email and ask each department

    I want to open an engineering / tech startup and I'm applying to physics so that I can be well versed in science in general, and understand everything that my business does.

    So I am looking for a university with people I can do something crazily ambitious with, and receive potential help from the university for our projects, and give us more freedom to work on things ourselves than be forced into a rigid structure and find employment / internships.

    Both unis will have the things you are looking for, you just have to seek them out (pure luck I guess on getting on with the ambitious people), going to career centre for the employment/internships, project wise it depends on what you mean by project?

    Give me all of the ugly truth you have (but make sure it's actually true). Hit me.
    answers in bold in quote
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    Both are ****, go somewhere renowned like london metropolitan or sunderland.
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    I get what you're coming from, but you'll find whichever university you go to that most of the people there are coasting. If you want to begin a start-up or something you have to act on your own initiative and hunt down the other people with your mindset. I studied at Durham and if you have any specific questions I can answer you.

    As for swapping courses, I completely changed degrees before going into Durham. As long as you take Foundations of Physics and Discovery Skills in Physics in first year, you can do Physics.
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    Want traditional go for durham, want contemporary go for warwick, warwick's got a pretty promising upcoming startup scene.
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    If you think you want to work in something related to engineering then study engineering. What you study in a physics degree and what you study in an engineering degree are very different.
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    (Original post by JuliusDS92)
    If you think you want to work in something related to engineering then study engineering. What you study in a physics degree and what you study in an engineering degree are very different.
    How much so?
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    (Original post by Maestori)
    Want traditional go for durham, want contemporary go for warwick, warwick's got a pretty promising upcoming startup scene.
    LOOOL please elaborate, good sir.
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    (Original post by TheFarmerLad)
    How much so?
    Not sure how to quantify it. Enough so that most engineering past papers (beyond the maths papers) are incomprehensible to me.
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    (Original post by JuliusDS92)
    Not sure how to quantify it. Enough so that most engineering past papers (beyond the maths papers) are incomprehensible to me.
    Just asking because I'm considering a future in engineering but planning on reading mathsphys at Warwick as it is a broader course!
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    (Original post by TheFarmerLad)
    Just asking because I'm considering a future in engineering but planning on reading mathsphys at Warwick as it is a broader course!
    If you plan to go into engineering do engineering, almost everything you do within your course will be irrelevant to engineering

    Theres a reason that people who want to be an engineer do an engineering degree, because thats where you gain the most skills required to be one. All the important topics covered in engineering like manufacture and design, processing, thermofluids, system design, materials, CAD work, electronics etc (these arent all of them just a few from various disciplines but what is relevant will vary) is not covered at all in a physics or maths degree

    the main things you cover in physics in later years are (dependent on what you chose)
    - particle phyiscs
    - quantum mechanics
    - condensed matter physics
    - medical physics
    - astrophysics
    - advanced mechanics (not relevant to engineering)
    - QTF
    - general relativity
    - magntism

    None of this remotely is relevant to engineering neither will the maths you cover in later years be

    So the maths and physics is broader but teaches you nothing that an engineering role requires knowledge wise

    user 'smack' will be able to give more advice from a engineers point of view (I am a physics student who once considered engineering as a degree and career before deciding it wasnt for me)
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    (Original post by madmadmax321)
    If you plan to go into engineering do engineering, almost everything you do within your course will be irrelevant to engineering

    Theres a reason that people who want to be an engineer do an engineering degree, because thats where you gain the most skills required to be one. All the important topics covered in engineering like manufacture and design, processing, thermofluids, system design, materials, CAD work, electronics etc (these arent all of them just a few from various disciplines but what is relevant will vary) is not covered at all in a physics or maths degree

    the main things you cover in physics in later years are (dependent on what you chose)
    - particle phyiscs
    - quantum mechanics
    - condensed matter physics
    - medical physics
    - astrophysics
    - advanced mechanics (not relevant to engineering)
    - QTF
    - general relativity
    - magntism

    None of this remotely is relevant to engineering neither will the maths you cover in later years be

    So the maths and physics is broader but teaches you nothing that an engineering role requires knowledge wise

    @http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/member.php?u=213123 will be able to give more advice from a engineers point of view (I am a physics student who once considered engineering as a degree and career before deciding it wasnt for me)
    Solid advice no doubt however I don't know whether I'd actually like to be an engineer, just said that it was a possible career of interest. Both my parents are in the finance business so I might follow in their footsteps - there's a lot of maths in that as well which would suit. But as for the whole choice of degree argument, I don't think it's too wise to pin your hopes just on the basis of what you think you might do in your later life..
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    (Original post by TheFarmerLad)
    Solid advice no doubt however I don't know whether I'd actually like to be an engineer, just said that it was a possible career of interest. Both my parents are in the finance business so I might follow in their footsteps - there's a lot of maths in that as well which would suit. But as for the whole choice of degree argument, I don't think it's too wise to pin your hopes just on the basis of what you think you might do in your later life..
    Thats alright then I guess, as long as its not your primary goal to be an engineer after uni as youll have a hard time getting into the career with a physics/maths degree (though not impossible mind)). For the last part that is what a lot of courses are designed for though, (ie engineering, nursing, medicine, teaching courses, any form of comp sci/IT) even physics and maths are there to give you the knowledge to go on to do a phd, its just lucky that the skills you gain from it are valued by employers of other fields
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    (Original post by JuliusDS92)
    Not sure how to quantify it. Enough so that most engineering past papers (beyond the maths papers) are incomprehensible to me.
    And the vice versa is also true. I've learned more about some fundamental physics topics like quantum mechanics from BBC 4 documentaries than I ever did in my engineering degree. (And I still know absolutely nothing about quantum mechanics.)

    I think that, to the uninitiated, they can look at least somewhat similar, like how all essay based subjects can appear similar to some of us STEM people, but once you study one of them and compare to the other you will see how different they are.

    (Original post by madmadmax321)
    If you plan to go into engineering do engineering, almost everything you do within your course will be irrelevant to engineering

    Theres a reason that people who want to be an engineer do an engineering degree, because thats where you gain the most skills required to be one. All the important topics covered in engineering like manufacture and design, processing, thermofluids, system design, materials, CAD work, electronics etc (these arent all of them just a few from various disciplines but what is relevant will vary) is not covered at all in a physics or maths degree

    the main things you cover in physics in later years are (dependent on what you chose)
    - particle phyiscs
    - quantum mechanics
    - condensed matter physics
    - medical physics
    - astrophysics
    - advanced mechanics (not relevant to engineering)
    - QTF
    - general relativity
    - magntism

    None of this remotely is relevant to engineering neither will the maths you cover in later years be

    So the maths and physics is broader but teaches you nothing that an engineering role requires knowledge wise

    user 'smack' will be able to give more advice from a engineers point of view (I am a physics student who once considered engineering as a degree and career before deciding it wasnt for me)
    I think you've provided quite an accurate summary. Ultimately engineering is a professional degree, designed to act as part of the preparation for becoming an engineer, whereas physics is a pure science degree and taken for the pursuit of physics knowledge itself.
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    (Original post by lordoftheties)
    LOOOL please elaborate, good sir.
    Sure thing, what specifically do you want me to elaborate upon?
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    (Original post by LibertyMan)
    Which produces graduates that end up being successful?

    Which has more serious people?

    Which has more ambitious people?

    Which is full of people there just for the partying?

    Which helps student projects more?

    Which has better links to industries?

    Which makes it easier to switch courses? (Important for me because I no longer want to do the sub-course I applied for in either)

    I want to open an engineering / tech startup and I'm applying to physics so that I can be well versed in science in general, and understand everything that my business does.

    So I am looking for a university with people I can do something crazily ambitious with, and receive potential help from the university for our projects, and give us more freedom to work on things ourselves than be forced into a rigid structure and find employment / internships.

    Give me all of the ugly truth you have (but make sure it's actually true). Hit me.
    Durham's people are smarter. End of thread.
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    I'm doing my A levels next year and i was wondering the same thing, except I want to know which of the top 10 is best for Drama/theatre studies. I lean more towards Warwick than any of the others, but apparently Lancaster (not top 10, but damn close) is pretty good too. I'm not smart nor committed enough for Oxbridge, so which of the others? Also, seems like there's an argument going on in here, I'm staying out of that.
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    (Original post by Harrymason)
    I'm doing my A levels next year and i was wondering the same thing, except I want to know which of the top 10 is best for Drama/theatre studies. I lean more towards Warwick than any of the others, but apparently Lancaster (not top 10, but damn close) is pretty good too. I'm not smart nor committed enough for Oxbridge, so which of the others? Also, seems like there's an argument going on in here, I'm staying out of that.
    I don't think this thread is suitable for your query. Drama and theater doesn't fit in with a thread about engineering, Physics and maths.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
 
 
 
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