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    I'm planning to do the first year of my A-levels after this summer. I have never done A levels before, because when I was in college I did B-tech & Business course. I only took that course because it was the easiest to me, with no homework and all work was done on the computer. But that was also the time where I was clueless on what I want to do as a living. I also didn't do as many GCSEs as other British students, because I was raised in USA, but I was born in the UK. I got As in GCSE English, Maths and Science. I've also had work experience in the medical field, by shadowing three different cardiothoracic surgeons over the span of four days. I've spectated five operations in the operating theatre, taken to pathology to be shown how to diagnose lung cancer and sat in on patient consultations.

    I am 26, single and have no children. I have been working for Royal Mail. I'm planning to do A level Biology, Chemistry, Maths and Physics. I was wondering how hard are A levels are compared to GCSEs and if there are any other ways to improve my chances for medical school.
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    Work experience is very important, ideally you would be working in the NHS as an HCA, but if that is not possible then you should gets as much work experience as possible. A levels wise then Bio and Chem are essential but Maths and Physics are not essential and are considered to be harder A levels and I would consider doing something easier, unless you are particularly scientifically minded to lessen the work load. Study hard and get good grades. When it comes to applying then you need to be critical in the Unis you apply to. Take both BMAT and UKCAT and if you like suffering GAMSAT as well. If you get an outstanding UKCAT apply to unis that highly value it. Newcastle Uni for example interviews all eligible students above a threshold, same with BMAT. Also some Unis might not even read your personal statement and reject you because of poor GCSEs obviously don't even think about applying to these unis. Look at widening participation and see if you are eligible, it might make it easier to get in. Get a good reference, make sure the person writing it knows how to write a competency based reference and is qualified to write it. Get TSR to check your personal statement as well and make sure it is perfect.

    IF you get get an interview do your research, what kind of interview is it, panel or MMI, and know the program for the school, if they teach by PBL then learn the merits of PBL ect.
    If you can afford it consider European medical schools as well, they will qualify you to practise in the UK.
    You could also consider access to medicine programs as they are only one year, this will limit the schools you can apply for but it is better than 2 years of A levels and no medical school place.

    Odds are stacked against you, but far far from impossible and if that's what you want to do go for it, but it will require dedication.
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    (Original post by ColossalAtom)
    I'm planning to do the first year of my A-levels after this summer. I have never done A levels before, because when I was in college I did B-tech & Business course. I only took that course because it was the easiest to me, with no homework and all work was done on the computer. But that was also the time where I was clueless on what I want to do as a living. I also didn't do as many GCSEs as other British students, because I was raised in USA, but I was born in the UK. I got As in GCSE English, Maths and Science. I've also had work experience in the medical field, by shadowing three different cardiothoracic surgeons over the span of four days. I've spectated five operations in the operating theatre, taken to pathology to be shown how to diagnose lung cancer and sat in on patient consultations.

    I am 26, single and have no children. I have been working for Royal Mail. I'm planning to do A level Biology, Chemistry, Maths and Physics. I was wondering how hard are A levels are compared to GCSEs and if there are any other ways to improve my chances for medical school.
    You could also try an Access to Medicine course, which are aimed at mature learners like yourself.

    Scroll to the bottom for a list of Medical schools that accept certain Access courses:
    http://www.medschools.ac.uk/SiteColl...%20courses.pdf
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    GCSEs have little impact on you as a mature student. It's certainly worth looking at access and seeing if it fits/would be accepted in place of other qualifications

    There's usually a big jump between gcse and a level. There certainly is one for maths as there's even a textbook to help you "bridge the gap". It's certainly worth your time to revise before course starts
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    Some Universities absolutely will 100% look at GCSE's even if you are a mature student, dont even think about applying to Manchester for example. Access to Medicine is certainly an option, the success from access to actually being accepted is pretty appalling and will limit the unis you can apply to. But it is only one year. You should look at entry requirements as some have very strict criteria such as 6 months continuous work in the NHS, whereas A levels don't.
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    I will look into getting more work experience this summer. One of the cardiothoracic surgeons I shadowed previously told me if I was ever interested into shadowing in other fields, I could speak to his secretary or visit him. I'm interested in neuro, so he sent an e-mail to a neurosurgeon before who agreed to take me on, but when the week came to start the experience - I got severely ill. So I called to cancel and planning to resume when I have a free week.

    I don't like the idea of Access to Medicine limits the amount of universities you can apply to. So I rather do A levels.
 
 
 
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