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    Hi everyone, I've got a bit of a dilemma that has been playing on my mind for a couple of months.
    I'm in year 13 and I'm coming to the end of my A levels and I have got a place at university to study midwifery. I'm really happy about this but I keep on thinking that I should have chosen to do nursing instead. This is because if I do a nursing degree I will have a better understanding of healthcare and I will get to work with a wide range of different people. Also with a nursing degree there are so many things that I can do after that, such as specialising in different areas or even being a midwife if I still wanted to.
    Has anyone else had this dilemma? I have got more experience related to nursing as well because I'm an NHS volunteer and I work with people in my waitressing job.
    I really don't know what to do. I can't change my course now, can I because UCAS has closed. Or can you change through clearing if there are any places?
    I want to be a midwife because it is such a rewarding career, you get to build relationships with patients, you work with families and support people through a very stressful time. But with nursing there so many different branches to it. Also with midwifery, a lot of the applicants are women who have already had children and I feel that i'll be in the minority.
    Sorry for the long post, but I would really appreciate some advice, thank you!
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    Hi BlueEyedGirl! You will still get a really good understanding of general healthcare by studying to be a midwife - and you will also work with lots of different people...every woman (and her family) will be unique and each day will be different. You will not only be working in the delivery suite but also on the neonatal and postnatal wards. If you wanted to change to nursing, you would have to apply to a specific branch - either child, adult, mental health or learning disabilities - so, in many ways, this is just as restrictive for 3 years as midwifery. A lot of universities do not allow you to swap branches - although you could do a conversion course after university if you wanted. Places on child nursing courses are rare in clearing as - like midwifery - it is just so competitive, but there may be places in clearing for adult, mental health and learning disabilities. Also, on your point about other applicants already having children, please don't feel intimidated by that!! My best friend did midwifery at 18 years old and she didn't have children of her own and she did great!! She is now a registered midwife and loves it. Lots of people won't have children! Have faith in yourself!

    My advice would be to choose what you really want to do and then do that. If that is nursing, then go for that, but don't go for it because you're doubting your abilities or prospects in midwifery. If you really like the idea of midwifery, stick to that and forget about the applicants with children of their own, or the fact that nursing has different branches! Nursing does have different branches, but you are likely to have to commit yourself to one of those branches anyway - so you will have to choose and restrict yourself at some point. Ultimately, do what you would most enjoy!! You will be doing the job every day, so it has to be something you will enjoy! x
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    Sorry - I should have added... I think the easiest way to convert to midwifery after a nursing course is if you were to do Adult nursing. You just have to decide whether that is something you would enjoy doing for 3 years before a conversion obviously with adult nursing you're treating men as well as women, aged 17 to the elderly. As a midwife, you'd just be treating women of child bearing age. All personal preference x
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    And fyi
    It's learning disabilities not difficulties.
    2 completely different concepts.

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    Thank you for that (somewhat snooty) clarification. I hope I didn't cause any offence, I was typing a reply quickly and only wanted to help. My intention was actually to be supportive.
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    (Original post by x.BlueEyedGirl.x)
    Hi everyone, I've got a bit of a dilemma that has been playing on my mind for a couple of months.
    I'm in year 13 and I'm coming to the end of my A levels and I have got a place at university to study midwifery. I'm really happy about this but I keep on thinking that I should have chosen to do nursing instead. This is because if I do a nursing degree I will have a better understanding of healthcare and I will get to work with a wide range of different people. Also with a nursing degree there are so many things that I can do after that, such as specialising in different areas or even being a midwife if I still wanted to.
    Has anyone else had this dilemma? I have got more experience related to nursing as well because I'm an NHS volunteer and I work with people in my waitressing job.
    I really don't know what to do. I can't change my course now, can I because UCAS has closed. Or can you change through clearing if there are any places?
    I want to be a midwife because it is such a rewarding career, you get to build relationships with patients, you work with families and support people through a very stressful time. But with nursing there so many different branches to it. Also with midwifery, a lot of the applicants are women who have already had children and I feel that i'll be in the minority.
    Sorry for the long post, but I would really appreciate some advice, thank you!
    Hello! I also want to be midwife! I've just started my adult nurse training and plan to do 18 month top up. Honestly it's personal preference. Either way you will get a wide scope so I wouldn't worry about that. Also you are still so young so you could easily take a year out and apply for nursing next time if that's an option for you. But you've done so well getting into midwifery it's so hard to get into. It's a hard decision. Have a good think at the pros and cons xx


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    (Original post by deviant182)
    It's not trying to be snooty or horrid etc.
    However, to someone with a learning disability vs someone with a difficulty, ie dyslexia, it can mean a lot.
    The sooner people realise that the better. You wouldn't call someone with bipolar or schizophrenia mental. So why do it with someone with a learning disability?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I understand that there is a difference and I have admitted that I made a mistake. As I explained, I didn't mean to cause any offence. I would not intentionally disrespect anyone with either a learning disability OR a learning difficulty - I was just typing quickly. I think it was clear from my first message to you that I was just trying to offer support and advice on your question rather than aiming to offend anyone. Making the correction between disability and difficulty wasn't snooty - but the way that you made your point was. It would have been nicer to acknowledge my reply to you and mention my mistake politely rather than launching straight into an attack. Maybe you didn't intend it that way, but it definitely came across as quite superior/ aggressive. Anyway I have now corrected my mistake so hopefully we can move on. I wish you luck with your nursing/ midwifery decision.
 
 
 
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