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    I am looking for a way of estimating the monetary value of some old books, first editions etc. A website, a method...anything at all that can't be found on the first few pages of Google
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    (Original post by Fenice)
    I am looking for a way of estimating the monetary value of some old books, first editions etc. A website, a method...anything at all that can't be found on the first few pages of Google
    There are a number of websites. The easiest to use is perhaps http://www.abebooks.co.uk/

    Four things to remember

    1 These are books on sale and are not sale prices.

    2 Dealers will expect to make a significant margin over what they pay for books to cover their costs and make a profit.

    3 The pricing of some rare but uninteresting books can be distorted if only one is on sale. Some very large dealers in withdrawn library stock use computer pricing algorithms. You can sometimes see books like out of date hotel guides from the 1970s priced at over £100 just because it is the only copy on the market anywhere in the world but no-one would give 100p for the book.

    4 Condition matters, particularly dust covers for 20th century hardback fiction.
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    you can put them for sale on ebay....
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    (Original post by the bear)
    you can put them for sale on ebay....
    ebay is very difficult now. I used to sell duplicates on ebay but it is very hard to get visibility any more. If you list outside the antiquarian sections, then you are just swamped by the sellers who are listing new books they don't have. All they are trying to do is take the data from the listings of all books in print and arbitrage the trade price plus postage to make a penny here and a penny there.

    The problems with the antiquarian sections is that many of the books are listed at four or five times their true values.

    Lack of visibility has driven away buyers. There are 109,905 transport books on ebay. You can't browse that many books. You can't really refine your search any further because over 95,000 of them are in the sub-category "unspecified"
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    ebay is very difficult now. I used to sell duplicates on ebay but it is very hard to get visibility any more. If you list outside the antiquarian sections, then you are just swamped by the sellers who are listing new books they don't have. All they are trying to do is take the data from the listings of all books in print and arbitrage the trade price plus postage to make a penny here and a penny there.

    The problems with the antiquarian sections is that many of the books are listed at four or five times their true values.

    Lack of visibility has driven away buyers. There are 109,905 transport books on ebay. You can't browse that many books. You can't really refine your search any further because over 95,000 of them are in the sub-category "unspecified"
    thanks for that interesting post. i have never tried to sell books on ebay myself, although i have bought quite a few.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    There are a number of websites. The easiest to use is perhaps http://www.abebooks.co.uk/

    Four things to remember

    1 These are books on sale and are not sale prices.

    2 Dealers will expect to make a significant margin over what they pay for books to cover their costs and make a profit.

    3 The pricing of some rare but uninteresting books can be distorted if only one is on sale. Some very large dealers in withdrawn library stock use computer pricing algorithms. You can sometimes see books like out of date hotel guides from the 1970s priced at over £100 just because it is the only copy on the market anywhere in the world but no-one would give 100p for the book.

    4 Condition matters, particularly dust covers for 20th century hardback fiction.
    Very helpful thanks - but as to 1, surely there must be somewhere to sell them at prices closer to their value? Cut out the middle man for example
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    (Original post by Fenice)
    Very helpful thanks - but as to 1, surely there must be somewhere to sell them at prices closer to their value? Cut out the middle man for example
    Ebay cuts out the middle man. So does a stall at a carboot sale.

    The problem with both is getting visibility with a wide enough audience.

    What the middleman does is carry the item in stock using up working capital and being a drain on income (lighting and rates for a shop, petrol to a bookfair, listing fees for ebay) until a buyer comes along.

    I used to sell well on ebay. Then I was away for a couple of years and when I came back ebay had changed. Most stuff is not sold by auction any more. It is possible to filter out much of the dross, but most potential buyers don't take the trouble. I have been giving stuff to charity shops because I am not prepared to spend time and effort listing stuff only for it not to sell.

    These are the antiquarian transport books on ebay filtered to include only lots offered by auction. There is a lot of good (and uncommon) stuff here. See how little of it has bids. The reason is that without carefully set filters, this is buried under a mound of dross.

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/Antiquaria...rtation&_sop=1
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    (Original post by Fenice)
    I am looking for a way of estimating the monetary value of some old books, first editions etc. A website, a method...anything at all that can't be found on the first few pages of Google
    having had a few old books over the years only 2 were worth anything decent out of 8 much but the best methods in regard to pricing are
    1. popularity
    it at a popular book so lord of the rings and james bond have value
    2. artwork
    sometimes a substandard book can have expensive artwork
    3. sequels
    surprisingly squalls are often rarer than the first book in a series so can out price the first part of a series

    ps if it's non-fiction a lot are outdated so are unless significantly old (<80 years+) are worthless even in immaculate condition unless they were significantly rare editions
    if it fiction, does it have a dust jacket if so the value will be a lot higher same as well as if it was a set do you have the full set or just one book i.e. the original dickens books are worth £50 each loose in good/fair condition but the full set of 30 is worth about £4,000
 
 
 
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