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    What do you guys think about the new gcse specification? Looking at the spiceman papers would you say that it's to hard, especially with them introducing a few a level topics, such as:
    iterative formuale
    compound and inverse functions
    gradients under a graph
    basic calculus and differentiation.
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    (Original post by theBranicAc)
    What do you guys think about the new gcse specification? Looking at the spiceman papers would you say that it's to hard, especially with them introducing a few a level topics, such as:
    iterative formuale
    compound and inverse functions
    gradients under a graph
    basic calculus and differentiation.
    No, it's good that they're finally taking a good step up with the GCSE. The old version was too much of wishy washy nonsense. This is a slight improvement.
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    Link me to specimen paper plz
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    No, it's good that they're finally taking a good step up with the GCSE. The old version was too much of wishy washy nonsense. This is a slight improvement.
    Most teachers don't agree with introducing calculus at GCSE - there was nothing wrong with the old syllabus if taught well.

    The issue I had with it was the way the papers were put togther to have so few A* questions. It is too easy to get a grade A now compared to previous specs.
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    (Original post by theBranicAc)
    What do you guys think about the new gcse specification? Looking at the spiceman papers would you say that it's to hard, especially with them introducing a few a level topics, such as:
    iterative formuale
    compound and inverse functions
    gradients under a graph
    basic calculus and differentiation.
    It's now become quite similar to the Edexcel IGCSE.

    I don't think it's as hard as everyone was expecting (from looking at the specimen papers) but I like the topics that have been added. I still expect there to be a lot of complaints after the first set of exams in 2017!

    I think the biggest change is the length - it's now 3 papers of 1.5 hrs each. I've set students these papers and they find it hard to perform consistently well over all 3 papers.
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    (Original post by Muttley79)
    Most teachers don't agree with introducing calculus at GCSE - there was nothing wrong with the old syllabus if taught well.

    The issue I had with it was the way the papers were put togther to have so few A* questions. It is too easy to get a grade A now compared to previous specs.
    I suppose I am a little biased coming from the CIE IGCSE where we were taught plenty of "normal board" AS stuff, but I thought that was really cool; although in hindsight, when learning all of that, I did secure a really high grade without 'actually understanding' why things were at the level I do now, I can certainly see where you're coming from. Food for though. :holmes:

    I haven't really looked indepth into the new spec, so I didn't know about the issue with the too few A* questions. I suppose at GCSE level, differentiating between top candidates isn't too imperative and there are alternative qualifications that the top candidates can pursue (FM GCSE? Add Maths? etc...).
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    (Original post by OddFuturez)
    Link me to specimen paper plz
    Take a look at the paper 3(problem solving) and paper 2.
    Attached Images
  1. File Type: pdf Grade 9 Paper2.pdf (783.8 KB, 330 views)
  2. File Type: pdf Grade 9 Paper3.pdf (492.6 KB, 304 views)
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    (Original post by theBranicAc)
    basic calculus and differentiation.
    This isn't in the new GCSE.
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    (Original post by Muttley79)
    Most teachers don't agree with introducing calculus at GCSE - there was nothing wrong with the old syllabus if taught well.

    The issue I had with it was the way the papers were put together to have so few A* questions. It is too easy to get a grade A now compared to previous specs.
    In my opinion the old gcse were FAR too easy, so much that halfway through year 9 I achieved an A grade. The problem was that the topics weren't difficult, all you had to do is remember a formula and just apply it with different numbers-only involves memory no problem solving.
    However the new gcse does seem quite hard, but I find that a good things as it prepares me for a level and its quite fun.
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    I suppose I am a little biased coming from the CIE IGCSE where we were taught plenty of "normal board" AS stuff, but I thought that was really cool; although in hindsight, when learning all of that, I did secure a really high grade without 'actually understanding' why things were at the level I do now, I can certainly see where you're coming from. Food for though. :holmes:

    I haven't really looked indepth into the new spec, so I didn't know about the issue with the too few A* questions. I suppose at GCSE level, differentiating between top candidates isn't too imperative and there are alternative qualifications that the top candidates can pursue (FM GCSE? Add Maths? etc...).
    It's better to learn calculus when you can understand it rather than just foliow a formula to differentiate/integrate.

    The problem with so few A* questions in the current exam paper structure [50% of the marks on a Higher paper are grade D/C questions] is that in some schools they don't bother to teach all the A* content - then students meet some ideas for the first time at AS. I notice this with students that join us in the sixth form,
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    (Original post by theBranicAc)
    In my opinion the old gcse were FAR too easy, so much that halfway through year 9 I achieved an A grade. The problem was that the topics weren't difficult, all you had to do is remember a formula and just apply it with different numbers-only involves memory no problem solving.
    However the new gcse does seem quite hard, but I find that a good things as it prepares me for a level and its quite fun.
    That's a slight exaggeration they weren't far too easy lol
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    (Original post by Muttley79)
    It's better to learn calculus when you can understand it rather than just foliow a formula to differentiate/integrate.
    Surely the good teachers will aim to have their students understand it?

    In either case, it's not like students at A-Level understand it either, whether it's introduced at GCSE or at A-Level, from what I can see. Perhaps a modicum more of understanding, but not extravagantly so.

    The problem with so few A* questions in the current exam paper structure [50% of the marks on a Higher paper are grade D/C questions] is that in some schools they don't bother to teach all the A* content - then students meet some ideas for the first time at AS. I notice this with students that join us in the sixth form,
    I see, yeah - I've seen this first hand with a student on this forum only a day or two ago, it was a big shock to me.

    BTW, out of curiosity, what have they done with the more... "bleh" topics like circle theorems, are they still included?
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    I suppose I am a little biased coming from the CIE IGCSE where we were taught plenty of "normal board" AS stuff
    I miss teaching this - good syllabus.

    Although Paper 4's were a bit too similar every year. You'd generally know what was coming in the paper and could usually expect a tricky sequence question at the end.
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    (Original post by notnek)
    I miss teaching this - good syllabus.

    Although Paper 4's were a bit too similar every year. You'd generally know what was coming in the paper and could usually expect a tricky sequence question at the end.
    I remember being taught the sequences topic as the last thing in the syllabus and being really uncomfortable with them, so the tricky sequences at the end was far from a blessing. :lol:
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    (Original post by OddFuturez)
    That's a slight exaggeration they weren't far too easy lol
    To me it was rather easy, all you have to do is remember the steps to solve a question.
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    (Original post by Muttley79)
    The issue I had with it was the way the papers were put togther to have so few A* questions. It is too easy to get a grade A now compared to previous specs.
    Are you referring to the current 2010 spec or the new spec?
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    BTW, out of curiosity, what have they done with the more... "bleh" topics like circle theorems, are they still included?
    What's wrong with circle theorems? I think it's a great topic.

    It hasn't changed in the new spec.
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    (Original post by notnek)
    What's wrong with circle theorems? I think it's a great topic.
    Geometry isn't my strong suit, but the entire topic feels very unmotivated. It's one of those topics that you learn in GCSE and then never really use again (or at least, I don't use them consciously... hmm, interesting).
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    Surely the good teachers will aim to have their students understand it?

    In either case, it's not like students at A-Level understand it either, whether it's introduced at GCSE or at A-Level, from what I can see. Perhaps a modicum more of understanding, but not extravagantly so.

    BTW, out of curiosity, what have they done with the more... "bleh" topics like circle theorems, are they still included?
    http://qualifications.pearson.com/en...tics-2015.html

    I think the extra maturity of meeting differentiation after half a term in Year 12 makes a big difference - I think the majority of my students do have a good understanding at that stage.

    Circle theorems and geometery is lovely - how can you describe it as 'bleh'?! Learning to write a proof or a coherent explanation is a good discipline at this stage of developing mathematicians.
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    (Original post by notnek)
    Are you referring to the current 2010 spec or the new spec?
    Current (Year 11) spec - no A* in the new.
 
 
 
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