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    I have been wondering for months now if i should choose to study medicine. i have got to right A levels most unit require to study it, but i just wanted to know is it worth the application process? I've heard its a very hard course to study, and that theres almost no free time. I know its very rewarding (job security etc.) but wanted to hear first hand from people studying it whats it like, and what they want to do after (job wise) so i can get a few ideas about it. Thanks for any help!
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    What did you get for GCSE if you don't mind me asking?
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    (Original post by brainzistheword)
    What did you get for GCSE if you don't mind me asking?
    I got mostly A's, A* for maths, A* for addition science (triple science not offered), English literature and language A, History A*, ICT A, French B, Religious studies B, Business Studies A, and thats about it. my lowest grade i think i got was the B's
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    (Original post by F121121)
    I have been wondering for months now if i should choose to study medicine. i have got to right A levels most unit require to study it, but i just wanted to know is it worth the application process? I've heard its a very hard course to study, and that theres almost no free time. I know its very rewarding (job security etc.) but wanted to hear first hand from people studying it whats it like, and what they want to do after (job wise) so i can get a few ideas about it. Thanks for any help!
    If you're not sure why not get some work experience

    The concept of no free time, at least for the first 2 years is not true. There is a lot of stuff to LEARN but not very much to do (meaing little coursework / in course assessments...at least on my course). Around exam time you need to motivate yourself to study but you will certainly have time to have fun.

    It sounds like you haven't researched much into medicine. Its best to look at the sort of things that you can do as there are LOADS (I mean LOADS)...and I would not be able to give you a decent overview of what you could do....

    good luck
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    I just started this year and I must say that the workload is manageable and it is better than I thought. There is a lot of studying to do, but because I really enjoy the course, it doesn't really bother me. I am very very happy for how the course is going.

    I would say that what I'm concerned about is the future of the job and doctors of the NHS with all the changes that are happening now. It is a rewarding career but also extremely demanding, so take your time to think whether you would perform well under pressure and whether the long hours that usually come with working in this field are something you are ok with.

    I would definitely recommend getting some work experience, shadowing or volunteering in a relevant role. Not only you will have something to show on your personal statement, it would also help you decide whether medicine is he right career for you.
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    (Original post by F121121)
    I have been wondering for months now if i should choose to study medicine. i have got to right A levels most unit require to study it, but i just wanted to know is it worth the application process? I've heard its a very hard course to study, and that theres almost no free time. I know its very rewarding (job security etc.) but wanted to hear first hand from people studying it whats it like, and what they want to do after (job wise) so i can get a few ideas about it. Thanks for any help!
    You haven't actually said anything about wanting to be a doctor so far. I'd start by asking yourself that. Then doing some work experience (if you haven't already), to give you some further insights and confirmation.

    Job security shouldn't be seen as the most rewarding bit of it either imho.
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    (Original post by alkyone)
    I just started this year and I must say that the workload is manageable and it is better than I thought. There is a lot of studying to do, but because I really enjoy the course, it doesn't really bother me. I am very very happy for how the course is going.

    I would say that what I'm concerned about is the future of the job and doctors of the NHS with all the changes that are happening now. It is a rewarding career but also extremely demanding, so take your time to think whether you would perform well under pressure and whether the long hours that usually come with working in this field are something you are ok with.

    I would definitely recommend getting some work experience, shadowing or volunteering in a relevant role. Not only you will have something to show on your personal statement, it would also help you decide whether medicine is he right career for you.
    Thanks for the reply, i was just wondering what type of work experience, old peoples home? Local hospice? GP's office doing admin work? I've heard that its very difficult to get work experience that is directly related to medicine. i can however get work experience at Pfizer, but i don't think this would help...
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    (Original post by F121121)
    Thanks for the reply, i was just wondering what type of work experience, old peoples home? Local hospice? GP's office doing admin work? I've heard that its very difficult to get work experience that is directly related to medicine. i can however get work experience at Pfizer, but i don't think this would help...
    Hospice, or a caring role should be easier than a shadowing role. Some hospitals have an application process for students who want to see how working in a hospital is like, but it is quite difficult to actually get to do it.Ask around and look online if becoming a doctor is something you are seriously considering. I would say a caring role is more relevant than one in a company.
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    Same road as you here... I'm afraid I'd be able to manage the first years then later on dropout due to the heavy load and the amounts needed to study, therefore I am having a self doubt, even though I enjoy helping others and have an interest for diseases/cures. Apparently in the later years I've head you're required to study more than the previous ones, etc... Wish if some med student would shed some light on that or have gone through the same thought process as me.
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    The work load of the medical degree is easy compared to the workload of being a junior doctor (or GP as I now am, suspect consultants still find their jobs stressful as well but being a junior doc could be awful at times). As a student you can choose how much and when and what you study. You could always know more so you have to set sensible limits on it.
    As a junior doctor your work will be full on for all of the time you are due to be working. You will be expected to make a lot of decisions rapidly and accurately and know when to ask for help. Upset and stressed patients and relatives will seem to moan at you constantly. Your phone (bleep in my day) will never seem to stop ringing.
    It is a stressful job. Don't ask yourself if you can cope with the studying, that's the easy bit as studying medicine should be fascinating and you should be good at exams to be thinking of doing medicine. Ask yourself if you want to be a doctor.
    It gets easier as you get older as the pattern recognition bit of diseases becomes easier but there is always more work than you can comfortably cope with.
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    (Original post by F121121)
    I have been wondering for months now if i should choose to study medicine. i have got to right A levels most unit require to study it, but i just wanted to know is it worth the application process? I've heard its a very hard course to study, and that theres almost no free time. I know its very rewarding (job security etc.) but wanted to hear first hand from people studying it whats it like, and what they want to do after (job wise) so i can get a few ideas about it. Thanks for any help!
    Be a junior doctor in 99% of cases. Obviously.

    I think you need to do more research into the career.
 
 
 
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