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    I was reading an article yesterday and an economist says that half of british jobs will be automated in the next five years. There are already driveless cars, trains. There will be mass unemployment. Do the government care?
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    (Original post by richard10012)
    I was reading an article yesterday and an economist says that half of british jobs will be automated in the next five years. There are already driveless cars, trains. There will be mass unemployment. Do the government care?
    That's why it's important to learn and possess skills/qualifications that will keep you in demand.

    It's simple Economics anyway, just how like we moved from the manufacturing sector to the tertiary sector (we have one of the biggest financial sectors in the world). The unemployment caused will be "structural" because there's a change in the pattern of demand, and there will be a mismatch of skills. This is unavoidable. We can't just decide not to go through with automation and advancing technology - it's clearly the way forward.
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    Technology taking all our jobs!! We need out of the EU and close our borders!

    Whatever you were reading was sensationalising. Jobs are absolutely shifting to automation, but half of British jobs won't be replaced by technology in 5 years. Not even close.

    As automation takes over, there'll be new jobs as our capabilities to do bigger things expand. Of course, a lot of new work will be skilled work. I'm not a fan of basic income but it seems inevitable.
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    (Original post by JordanL_)
    Technology taking all our jobs!! We need out of the EU and close our borders!
    You forgot smash all the stocking frames!
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    the greatest improvement to life is technology....
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    I love technology and how it's shaping our future. Technology leads to tasks being done more efficiently, more quickly, and more accurately.
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    Ironic the OP uses a computer and the internet to complain about technology.
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    (Original post by JordanL_)
    Technology taking all our jobs!! We need out of the EU and close our borders!

    .
    Hehehe
    Exactly!
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    (Original post by JordanL_)

    As automation takes over, there'll be new jobs as our capabilities to do bigger things expand. Of course, a lot of new work will be skilled work. I'm not a fan of basic income but it seems inevitable.
    I'm of the same opinion.

    Basic income seems absurd, proposed only by the most out their leftists or Milton Friedman. But if automation continues to ebb away at jobs, it will be inevitable. We can try hold the tide back, by keeping a large amount of people in low paid non-jobs, but the resulting productivity loses will seriously harm our economy. The jobs simply won't be there, and to have a really large amount of people on the dole, living on the breadline, will be impractical and absurd given that they'll never be enough job supply to employ those people. It will also harm demand as people simply won't be able to consume. In ways we have seen similar situation in many post-industrial areas of the UK, although on a much smaller scale. We could have an extremely over bloated public sector, but that would be probably be more costly than basic income. I think for the large part this will be a problem that will define the later half of this century.
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    This is pretty much inevitable, no matter how much politicians try to push back what they don't see as electorally favourable.

    The key, for me, is to uncouple having a job and being able to live a full and fair life.. Once that happens, there really is no reasonable opposition to automation as it just gives people more free time to do with what they will as opposed to us having people in jobs for no other reason than some ridiculous puritanical ethos about hard work.
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    (Original post by High Stakes)
    That's why it's important to learn and possess skills/qualifications that will keep you in demand.
    The link for the source seems to have died but...

    "We have developed a technique for extracting the laws of nature from experimental data by identifying invariant and conservation equations. We demonstrated this approach by automatically searching motion-tracking data captured from various physical systems, ranging from simple harmonic oscillators to chaotic double-pendula. Without any prior knowledge about physics, kinematics or geometry, the algorithm discovered Hamiltonians, Lagrangians, and other laws of geometric and momentum conservation."

    AI can discover physical laws it took us 1000s of years to discover. :eek3:

    http://creativemachines.cornell.edu/natural_laws

    http://physics.stackexchange.com/que...hysics-resarch

    AI is coming for the types of jobs that require more qualifications. Also not everyone can be a programmer. Programming requires a good ability at Maths. You can't expect everyone to be able to do that and you can't expect someone who left school at 16 and has spent all their life being a steel worker to just switch over to being a physicist...

    Increasing the only other jobs for these people is picking/packing type jobs that are completely unskilled, pay terribly, awful working conditions, poorly unionised and they are jobs that should be automated but are kept alive by cheep labour.

    (Original post by richard10012)
    I was reading an article yesterday and an economist says that half of british jobs will be automated in the next five years. There are already driveless cars, trains. There will be mass unemployment. Do the government care?
    There is something wrong with humanity if machinery doing work for us becomes a bad thing...

    Stephen Hawking Says We Should Really Be Scared Of Capitalism, Not Robots

    "If machines produce everything we need, the outcome will depend on how things are distributed. Everyone can enjoy a life of luxurious leisure if the machine-produced wealth is shared, or most people can end up miserably poor if the machine-owners successfully lobby against wealth redistribution. So far, the trend seems to be toward the second option, with technology driving ever-increasing inequality." ~ Stephan Hawking

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/...b0dbb8000d9f15
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    The link for the source seems to have died but...

    "We have developed a technique for extracting the laws of nature from experimental data by identifying invariant and conservation equations. We demonstrated this approach by automatically searching motion-tracking data captured from various physical systems, ranging from simple harmonic oscillators to chaotic double-pendula. Without any prior knowledge about physics, kinematics or geometry, the algorithm discovered Hamiltonians, Lagrangians, and other laws of geometric and momentum conservation."

    http://creativemachines.cornell.edu/natural_laws

    http://physics.stackexchange.com/que...hysics-resarch

    AI is coming for the types of jobs that require more qualifications. Also not everyone can be a programmer. Programming requires a good ability at Maths. You can't expect everyone to be able to do that and you can't expect someone who left school at 16 and has spend all their life being a steel worker to just switch over to being a physicist...

    Increasing the only other jobs for these people is picking/packing type jobs that are completely unskilled, pay terribly, awful working conditions, poorly unionised and they are jobs that should be automated but are kept alive by cheep labour.
    Although I agree that AI will be able to do a lot of the things that mathematicians and physicists have devoted their lives to uncovering, I think a lot of people miss out on the application. Can a computer take what it has learnt and apply it to completely new fields, to innovate? To take a risk? Can a computer take what it has learned in physics or mathematics to physically create new technologies of its own? People will still have to understand a lot of the heavy-mathematics and be able to take it and use it to make the world better.
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    (Original post by Swanbow)
    I'm of the same opinion.Basic income seems absurd, proposed only by the most out their leftists or Milton Friedman. But if automation continues to ebb away at jobs, it will be inevitable. We can try hold the tide back, by keeping a large amount of people in low paid non-jobs, but the resulting productivity loses will seriously harm our economy. The jobs simply won't be there, and to have a really large amount of people on the dole, living on the breadline, will be impractical and absurd given that they'll never be enough job supply to employ those people. It will also harm demand as people simply won't be able to consume. In ways we have seen similar situation in many post-industrial areas of the UK, although on a much smaller scale. We could have an extremely over bloated public sector, but that would be probably be more costly than basic income. I think for the large part this will be a problem that will define the later half of this century.
    "So what do we need to do to capture hope? That is the issue. In the 50s and 60s the dream of shared prosperity was that which gave hope. Even the Tories latched onto it: Ted Heath, the one nation Tories and so on. So I think the basic income approach is capable of doing this as long as (and this is what I emphasise when I talk to the Corbynistas) you can explain to them where the money will come from, that it will not be simply debt, that we are going to generate a lot more income and a chunk of it is going to fund this. But we, the Left, must not be fearful. I gave a talk some time ago in the United States and said: yes, surfers in California must be fed by the rest of us. We may not like that, we may feel they are bums, but they deserve a basic income too.

    OK, they don’t “deserve”, but they should have a basic income, because this is the way to stabilise society. But you need politicians that are capable of going out there and saying: “You see that lazy bum over there that you hate? We should feed him. And we should make sure he has a house. Because if he does not have a house and he gets sick and so on, he is a greater burden for all of us. And if there are lots of them and technological innovation produces a lot more of them, that would be macro-economically unsustainable. Those of us who want to work—because we enjoy it and have the opportunity—have the technology to produce so much wealth that we can feed the surfers.” But who says that?"

    http://www.economist.com/ESDvaroufakis?fsrc=gp_en?fsrc=sc n/fb/te/bl/ed/transcriptinterviewwithyanisvaro ufakis

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    (Original post by High Stakes)
    Although I agree that AI will be able to do a lot of the things that mathematicians and physicists have devoted their lives to uncovering, I think a lot of people miss out on the application. Can a computer take what it has learnt and apply it to completely new fields, to innovate? To take a risk? Can a computer take what it has learned in physics or mathematics to physically create new technologies of its own? People will still have to understand a lot of the heavy-mathematics and be able to take it and use it to make the world better.
    And you are going to be able to sustain a capitalist consumer driven economy on a the back of boffins, who make up tiny percentage of the population, steering the AI?
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    And you are going to be able to sustain a capitalist consumer driven economy on a the back of boffins, who make up tiny percentage of the population, steering the AI?
    Yes that is the plan. But we will increase the number of scientists and engineers over time AND we will increase the number of creative positions (the economy will adjust for itself) - creative industries is the one thing that AI cannot touch. It cannot act, make films, make impactful video games, write novels, tell jokes. So in the future, we're all happy.
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    (Original post by High Stakes)
    Yes that is the plan. But we will increase the number of scientists and engineers over time AND we will increase the number of creative positions (the economy will adjust for itself) - creative industries is the one thing that AI cannot touch. It cannot act, make films, make impactful video games, write novels, tell jokes. So in the future, we're all happy.
    AI is still very much in it's infancy and whilst although quite a number of jobs can be replaced with AI there are still very fundamental algorithmic flaws that those machines have to use. Give it a few decades and with progress the creative industries will be chipped away also.
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    (Original post by richard10012)
    I was reading an article yesterday and an economist says that half of british jobs will be automated in the next five years. There are already driveless cars, trains. There will be mass unemployment. Do the government care?
    I'm actually surprised there isn't more Machine Learning/DS/AI Research Investments given the amount of sustainability and money that would ensue.
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    "biggest threat" huh?
    if you don't no what to do with freedom and liberty... maybe you should go for a walk, listen to the birds (if there are any left) and take in some of that sweet nitrogen oxide rich air.

    I hope every job in the world becomes automated - it could of been done decades ago - so people can focus on restoring nature.
    But this JOB (just over broke) culture remains.
 
 
 
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