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Electric shock collar for cats? watch

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    Never, ever use a shock collar. Under any circumstances.

    They are barbaric and cruel for so many reasons - there is not one good reason to use them and anyone that knows anything about cats will tell you the same.

    I'm surprised people there are still people left that would even think about using something so cruel.
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    I have a better idea. Get rid of one...
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    Have you thought about getting your cat neutered?
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    (Original post by King Scorchy)
    Never, ever use a shock collar. Under any circumstances.

    They are barbaric and cruel for so many reasons - there is not one good reason to use them and anyone that knows anything about cats will tell you the same.

    I'm surprised people there are still people left that would even think about using something so cruel.
    I think that the cat would prefer to be shocked a couple of times over being dead.
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    (Original post by emobambam)
    Have you thought about getting your cat neutered?
    Both cats are already neutered.
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    (Original post by Betelgeuse-)
    The problem with spraying the water is you punish the poor victim aswell. The other cat is already traumatised. I vote shock collar / removing aggressive cat from home
    I do my best to only spray the aggressive cat though he goes right back to attacking after a short while. As for getting rid of him, he can be so friendly and just such a lovely cat that I don't want to. I think the shock collar would be the lesser evil, however I bought the product in my OP to have a go with first.
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    (Original post by Sabertooth)
    Both cats are already neutered.
    I have a lot of experience with cats. There were always dogs and cats around my household growing up. In my experience cats that are not related to each other and are of the same sex don't get along. It's just their instincts to want to be dominant more than the other cat. Some veterinarians will suggest hormone therapy but I actually tried that with a cat and it did not work. All it did was cost money. If they don't get along you may have to make a difficult choice. It's better to do it now in case it's more difficult for you later to do it emotionally.
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    (Original post by Sabertooth)
    I think the shock collar would be the lesser evil...
    Please don't. If necessary find a no-kill rehoming shelter.

    http://www.nokillnetwork.org/
    (I've no idea if that link is any good...)

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    (Original post by Sabertooth)
    I think that the cat would prefer to be shocked a couple of times over being dead.
    It would be better to separate them or simply not own one of them than to make one wear a shock collar. That's how cruel shock collars are.
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    (Original post by King Scorchy)
    It would be better to separate them or simply not own one of them than to make one wear a shock collar. That's how cruel shock collars are.
    And they are banned in many European countries, which emphasises the concern about using one.

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    (Original post by Sabertooth)
    I do my best to only spray the aggressive cat though he goes right back to attacking after a short while. As for getting rid of him, he can be so friendly and just such a lovely cat that I don't want to. I think the shock collar would be the lesser evil, however I bought the product in my OP to have a go with first.
    I can totally sympathise. My kitten is 6 months and the most friendly loving affectionate cat but when he gets energy or amped up, he is extremely aggressive. Any sort of reprimand makes him twice as aggressive and angry. Recently resorted to spraying him which worked at first but he had rapidly become desensitised to it and enjoy cleaning himself with the water lol

    He is a monster when he is on one, i actually worry about the cats in my neighbourhood getting on his bad side
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    (Original post by King Scorchy)
    It would be better to separate them or simply not own one of them than to make one wear a shock collar. That's how cruel shock collars are.
    If I give him up, he gets euthanized.

    It's not like I'd shock him for no reason, I imagine he'd learn pretty fast. :dontknow:
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    (Original post by Betelgeuse-)
    I can totally sympathise. My kitten is 6 months and the most friendly loving affectionate cat but when he gets energy or amped up, he is extremely aggressive. Any sort of reprimand makes him twice as aggressive and angry. Recently resorted to spraying him which worked at first but he had rapidly become desensitised to it and enjoy cleaning himself with the water lol

    He is a monster when he is on one, i actually worry about the cats in my neighbourhood getting on his bad side
    Have you tried using a laser pointer to wear him out? I can make my cat run up and down the stairs numerous times after that little red dot, until he's panting and falls over. You don't need to touch him but can give him an outlet for his aggression.
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    (Original post by Sabertooth)
    Have you tried using a laser pointer to wear him out? I can make my cat run up and down the stairs numerous times after that little red dot, until he's panting and falls over. You don't need to touch him but can give him an outlet for his aggression.
    Yes! I have a green one but it doesnt wear him out. My arm starts aching after 10 minutes and hes like "More" "More"!
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    (Original post by Betelgeuse-)
    Yes! I have a green one but it doesnt wear him out. My arm starts aching after 10 minutes and hes like "More" "More"!
    Aw

    Have you tried making him run up and down the stairs? Might just be because he's a kitten, as he gets older he might calm down a bit.

    My cat goes crazy for catnip, he'll grab the pouch and kick and bite it for a good 15 - 25 minutes, so perhaps try that if you want to keep him occupied? Just make sure not to attempt to remove it from him though
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    (Original post by Sabertooth)
    Aw

    Have you tried making him run up and down the stairs? Might just be because he's a kitten, as he gets older he might calm down a bit.

    My cat goes crazy for catnip, he'll grab the pouch and kick and bite it for a good 15 - 25 minutes, so perhaps try that if you want to keep him occupied? Just make sure not to attempt to remove it from him though
    I haven't tried that but i dont think he would do it (Running up and down the stairs) however we have only recently been letting him go out (Because gf wanted his balls done - apparently male kittens not done tend to stray and get run over) so he is expending more energy these past few weeks chasing birds and greeting other cats in the neighbourhood lol
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    So many ridiculous sentimental posts. OP clearly wants practical solutions beyond being told he's inhumane for considering it.


    The other solutions are his first cat living in terror or his second cat being euthanised. Both of these are surely worse options than his cat getting a little electric shock? Have some perspective that goes deeper than your first emotional reaction.
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    (Original post by Sabertooth)
    If I give him up, he gets euthanized.

    It's not like I'd shock him for no reason, I imagine he'd learn pretty fast. :dontknow:
    What about the no-kill rescues? Any on that link I posted?
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    (Original post by Sabertooth)
    I got another cat a couple of months ago and he keeps attacking my first cat. They're both male, the first is 4 years and the new one is 2 years old.

    I want to stop the new one attacking my other cat so I thought if I could shock him everytime he does it he might stop. Does anyone have experience with such a collar?

    I also found this:
    http://www.amazon.com/SENTRY-Stop-Th...ollar+for+cats Has anyone tried something similar?


    If not a shock collar, does anyone have any other ideas that might work? I spray him with water which splits them up but he just attacks again a few minutes later. I also tried clapping my hands loudly but again he just goes back to attacking.
    This is inhumane. If your cats are fighting then you did not integrate them properly. At this point, if you cannot see a peaceful resolution, I would consider rehoming the new cat. You do not have to have the new cat euthanized.

    Integration is such an important part of having a new cat come to live with you. It's part of the responsibility that comes with looking after them.

    You ****ed up, don't take it out on them.
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    Please don't buy an electric shock collar or spray them with water. All this does is reinforce the experience that bad things happen when this other cat is around. Hitting them/tapping them only serves to harm your own bond with them as they wont understand why you're hurting them.

    I have this problem currently with two of my cats that previously got along fine. My once gentle and sweet kitty now attacks the younger one viciously any time she see's her, unfortunately. What you need to do is keep them separate at all times and slowly re-introduce them to each other.

    Start by spending time with them one after the other so that you smell of the other cat each time you go to pet them, etc., then swap blankets around room to room so they become used to the smell of the other cat without seeing them. Once you've done this for a few days you can start feeding them on either side of a closed door, so they are close by each other and can smell one another but are given a pleasurable experience ie: eating. Keep doing this until you can have the door open and you sat between them with your legs as a barrier for safety reasons. Once they get used to seeing each other whilst eating it will build up more pleasurable experiences associated with being around one another. Keep doing this until you can trust them to eat together without you sitting between them, etc. You should get the gist of it. Basically reintroduce them as if it were a whole new cat but go slow. It will take months and hard work. Do not leave them alone together until you can 10000% trust them or else you will undo all your hard work.

    Good luck!
 
 
 
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