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Want to study physics at university but only have basic knowledge Watch

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    I've been interested in physics for a very long time and I was thinking about studying it at university. I've seen some foundation courses in physics but I don't know if I will struggle or if I'll make it etc... I'm also not very smart.
    Should I go for it or find something else?
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    (Original post by PatchWrona)
    I've been interested in physics for a very long time and I was thinking about studying it at university. I've seen some foundation courses in physics but I don't know if I will struggle or if I'll make it etc... I'm also not very smart.
    Should I go for it or find something else?
    University physics is demanding. You will definitely need a solid aptitude for higher-level mathematics, complex problem solving ability, practical engineering ability and be able to absorb substantial amounts of information - often quite disparate in nature. These descriptions are somewhat subjective I know.

    A Foundation Course is akin to an undergraduate first year for students with good A-level ability but have not taken the necessary subjects for direct entry. It covers the first year of a modified full-time graduate programme which then allows progression to their standard fully accredited degree programme. Some university programmes are not fully accredited and can only be 'topped up' to an ordinary (not honours) degree after a further course. You need to check with each university if they offer such courses and also for their entry requirements.

    The best way of determining if you are likely to both stay and cope with the distance for a full-time university course will be to study A-level Mathematics, Physics and another subject as a precursor. Your grades in these subjects will be a good indicator of your own ability and determine your chances for a successful university application as the traditional route to a degree in Physics.

    Alternatively, you might try the Open University scheme which allows you to take modules suited to your own time (and financial) constraints. This also gives you the chance of reviewing your options as you progress. Your degree award will be granted after you achieve the prescribed number of points from both compulsory subject matter as well as optional choices.

    To get onto the A-level courses, you will need to have an appropriate number of GCSE grades including A* - B's in Science, Mathematics and English. Where you intend to study your A-level course will determine the entry requirements at that establishment.

    As far as I am aware, 'Access to Science' courses do not achieve the necessary entrance requirements for University Physics but again, check with the university you want to study with.
 
 
 
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