Help on understanding UK politics. Watch

Karaleigh19
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Hello, I would very much like to get into politics and the system in the UK, but I am pretty clueless and I'm finding it difficult to learn purely by watching/reading the news and using google.

Would someone be willing to take some time to explain it to me? Maybe through PMs or something.

I am getting stuck on the different political parties and how they work and also the elections and what not.

Thanks!
(And sorry if this is the wrong forum).
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ZoeN2
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It's great that you are interested in politics as many young people will not touch it will a bargepole!

What exactly would you like to know? PM's are Members of Parliament which are elected through a election in the local area which happens every 5 years in the General Election. This is a opportunity for politics parties to put forward their candidate who members of the pubic vote for. Usually before this time the candidates will issues leaflets or campaign for their election. If this election is won then the candidate become the MP for the local area and has a seat in parliament.

The more seats a political party gains the more chance they have of winning the general election. For example the Conservatives are in power at the moment because they won 331 seats compared to Labour who won 232. There is a maximum of 650 seats to be won.

The Conservative party is what would be described as 'right wing" while the Labour party generally are "left wing" There are many other parties such as Green who are seen as very left wing and the UKIP who are very right. The Liberal Democrats are seen as central left wing.

I hope this helps
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Karaleigh19
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(Original post by ZoeN2)
It's great that you are interested in politics as many young people will not touch it will a bargepole!

What exactly would you like to know? PM's are Members of Parliament which are elected through a election in the local area which happens every 5 years in the General Election. This is a opportunity for politics parties to put forward their candidate who members of the pubic vote for. Usually before this time the candidates will issues leaflets or campaign for their election. If this election is won then the candidate become the MP for the local area and has a seat in parliament.

The more seats a political party gains the more chance they have of winning the general election. For example the Conservatives are in power at the moment because they won 331 seats compared to Labour who won 232. There is a maximum of 650 seats to be won.

The Conservative party is what would be described as 'right wing" while the Labour party generally are "left wing" There are many other parties such as Green who are seen as very left wing and the UKIP who are very right. The Liberal Democrats are seen as central left wing.

I hope this helps
How are the seats won? You said the MP for the local area has a seat in parliament, and the Conservatives (for example) won 331 seats. What does that mean? How does the Conservatives having 331 seats correlate to the candidate/MP for the local area having a seat in parliament?

Thanks!

-Oh and I plan on studying some form of international relations (or a government/politics) related degree eventually and I want to start learning properly now.
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M14B
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I would suggest reading an A level text book used in "Government and Politics"
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ZoeN2
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Seats are a term for the number of people who literally have seats in Parliament. This means that out of the 650 seats in Parliament Conservative MP's occupy 331 of them, which means they have a larger voice in parliament compared to the Liberal Democrats, for example, who have just 8.

Seats are won when a candidate for a local area wins therefore the area in under that political parties control such as issues on housing, roads and environment.
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ZoeN2
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I'm only doing GCSE haha don't worry you will pick it up quickly. It's interesting compared to what other people talk about.

I really want to study Politics and international Relations as well
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NoBanksInHeaven
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It's full of lies and deceit.
Look up Tony Blair; Iraq war, Afghanistan.
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username2488725
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(Original post by Karaleigh19)
How are the seats won? You said the MP for the local area has a seat in parliament, and the Conservatives (for example) won 331 seats. What does that mean? How does the Conservatives having 331 seats correlate to the candidate/MP for the local area having a seat in parliament?

Thanks!

-Oh and I plan on studying some form of international relations (or a government/politics) related degree eventually and I want to start learning properly now.
So each constituency has a "seat" in parliament. Members of a political party put themselves forward as a candidate for that constituency and they go around and campaign for votes within that constituency. The candidate who gets the most votes (first past the post) wins the seat.

Winning 331 seats means that there are 331 constituencies in the UK where the Conservative candidate has won/gained the most votes.

The candidate who has gained the most votes in the constituency is called an MP (Member of Parliament)

-
NB: I don't study politics, but I do follow it somewhat and I do apologise if anything I said was wrong. Feel free to correct me folks if I am
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blackdiamond97
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This website is very detailed but I think it gives you a good, unbiased rundown of UK politics.

(Original post by M14B)
I would suggest reading an A level text book used in "Government and Politics"
If you haven't chosen your A levels, I'm going to go one step further and say take the AS course, I found the Edexcel one to be very good for people who doesn't know too much about politics but is interested in it
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Punkrockfan
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http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/atta...chmentid=56962 , if this link works check it out, i think it explains the basics very well

ALSO, make sure to pick up politics at as level its awesome!
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NoBanksInHeaven
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(Original post by blackdiamond97)
This website is very detailed but I think it gives you a good, unbiased rundown of UK politics.



If you haven't chosen your A levels, I'm going to go one step further and say take the AS course, I found the Edexcel one to be very good for people who doesn't know too much about politics but is interested in it
that website is endorsed by Liam Fox.
He wanted to blow Syria into even more pieces.
Also read out his expenses... the guy is a snake.
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Karaleigh19
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Thanks guys! So the Conservative Party is in power now, how does that happen? Through election, I'm assuming, but how is David Cameron Prime Minister?

Sorry if these are silly questions.
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NoBanksInHeaven
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(Original post by Karaleigh19)
Thanks guys! So the Conservative Party is in power now, how does that happen? Through election, I'm assuming, but how is David Cameron Prime Minister?

Sorry if these are silly questions.
He was selected by the party.
He was the most marketable for the British people
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username2488725
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(Original post by Karaleigh19)
Thanks guys! So the Conservative Party is in power now, how does that happen? Through election, I'm assuming, but how is David Cameron Prime Minister?

Sorry if these are silly questions.
David Cameron is PM because he is the leader of the political party in the House of Commons with the most seats. Generally leaders are chosen in leadership elections that are internal to the party.
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blackdiamond97
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(Original post by NoBanksInHeaven)
that website is endorsed by Liam Fox.
He wanted to blow Syria into even more pieces.
Also read out his expenses... the guy is a snake.
Endorsed, not written. I'd be lying if I said I went through the entire website with a fine toothed comb to check for bias but it helped me and others in my class last year.
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Karaleigh19
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(Original post by CrazyFool229)
David Cameron is PM because he is the leader of the political party in the House of Commons with the most seats. Generally leaders are chosen in leadership elections that are internal to the party.
Okay, so the political party decides it's 'main' leader but it still has the local MP's for each constituency for that part too? Each party has it's 'main' leader and the 'local' MP person ('leader')?
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username2488725
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(Original post by Karaleigh19)
Okay, so the political party decides it's 'main' leader but it still has the local MP's for each constituency for that part too? Each party has it's 'main' leader and the 'local' MP person ('leader'?
I wouldn't say the local MP is the "leader", more of a representative of the constituency to parliament.
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NoBanksInHeaven
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(Original post by Karaleigh19)
Okay, so the political party decides it's 'main' leader but it still has the local MP's for each constituency for that part too? Each party has it's 'main' leader and the 'local' MP person ('leader'?
all MP's have constituencies they 'represent' (most of them are not even from the area), the leader is just the face. He picks a "cabinet" (just a team from the elected people) for different things: work & pensions, sports, etc. etc. whatever else they make up.
as I said the leader is just someone they nominate to be the face of the party.
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Karaleigh19
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(Original post by CrazyFool229)
I wouldn't say the local MP is the "leader", more of a representative of the constituency to parliament.
I wasn't sure how to put it. But that sums it up I guess, thanks!
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