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    -----------Compare and contrast WAN connection optionsavailable for use for the offices within the group. You should consider bothprivate and public WAN options in these categories: · Dedicated lines· Packet and circuit switchedsolutions · internet options Consider the relative benefits offered and make a justified recommendation as to the mostappropriate technologies for the company --------

    So basically, no where else to go. What does it mean where its asking for dedicated lines, packet/circuit switched solutions and internet options?
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    Without trying to give you all the answers:

    A dedicated line is just that. It's a line that's dedicated to something. A dedicated line between 2 computers for example is a direct connection between those 2 computers, instead of networking via several switches. Do you want the office to have dedicated lines between departments? Look at the benefits (e.g. a dedicated, reliable, fast connection) vs the drawbacks (specific cost of installing a dedicated line that can only be used for one thing).

    Packet switching and circuit switching are methods of transferring data over the network. Packet switching involves sending out the packets and they take the most efficient route. For example a packet reaches a router on it's way to the destination. The router sends the packet towards the destination via the fastest possible route. The next packet arrives at that router and takes a different route which is now the fastest. Circuit switching decides a specific route before any data is sent so that every packet takes the same route. Circuit switching is more efficient as you make better use of all existing network resources while packet switching is simpler to implement (pick a route and sent).

    Internet options is pretty ambiguous. I'd need to know more context to know what it's asking for. I'd assume it's asking whether the office needs a dedicated internet connection to the outside world? Or if they want an internal intranet.

    From what I understand you've been given a client (the office) and have to make a network recommendation. So you need to pick which technologies to use and justify them. When I did these sorts of questions there wasn't a wrong answer. My teacher accepted any essay provided we could justify our options.

    Hopefully that gives you a starting point. Feel free to drop me a message, post here or whatever if you've got any questions or if something isn't clear. Good luck
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    Wow, did expect an replay so fast, and yes it is an office.

    Company InformationBlackpool Office – · Management Team – 4 staff members and 4 IP phones· Administration Team – 12 staffmembers and 12 IP Phones· Software Support Team - 6 staff members and 2 IP phones· Software Development Team - 8 staff members and 2 IP phones· Marketing - 2 staff members and 2 IP Phones· Sales & Finance - 3 staff members and 3 IP phones· Research - 4 staff members and 1 IP phoneTwo IP connected printers are required

    GlasgowOffice – · Management Team – 3 staffmembers and 3 IP phones· Administration Team – 7 staffmembers and 7 IP phones· Software Support – 5 staffmembers and 1 IP phone· Software Development - 1 staffmember and 1 IP phoneOne IP printer is required for this office

    London Office · Management/Admin Team - 4 staff members and 4 IP phones· Software Support Team - 5 staff membersand 1IP phones· Software Development Team - 1 staff member and 1 IP Phone One IP printer is required for this office443,��PJ�mz
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    [QUOTE=lma 07;64590371]Wow, did expect an replay so fast, and yes it is an office.

    Company InformationBlackpool Office – · Management Team – 4 staff members and 4 IP phones· Administration Team – 12 staffmembers and 12 IP Phones· Software Support Team - 6 staff members and 2 IP phones· Software Development Team - 8 staff members and 2 IP phones· Marketing - 2 staff members and 2 IP Phones· Sales & Finance - 3 staff members and 3 IP phones· Research - 4 staff members and 1 IP phoneTwo IP connected printers are required

    GlasgowOffice – · Management Team – 3 staffmembers and 3 IP phones· Administration Team – 7 staffmembers and 7 IP phones· Software Support – 5 staffmembers and 1 IP phone· Software Development - 1 staffmember and 1 IP phoneOne IP printer is required for this office

    London Office · Management/Admin Team - 4 staff members and 4 IP phones· Software Support Team - 5 staff membersand 1IP phones· Software Development Team - 1 staff member and 1 IP Phone One IP printer is required for this office
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    Sorry for two posts, that was a mistake.
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    Ah okay, sounds like the sort of stuff I had to do. So they're basically just asking what sort of WAN would you use to connect the different sites. Do you think a private or public WAN is better and why? Should they use packet switching or circuit switching and why? And so on.

    I'd make a list of the benefits and drawbacks of each, what's good and bad about a private WAN, good and bad about a public WAN and so on then pick whichever one has the most important good points. If you can only think of one good point but it outweighs all the bad points then that's fine, go ahead and use it but make sure you justify.

    Consider things like cost, resources, performance, usability and remember to make it relative. Don't just say why a private WAN with packet switching is good, explain why it's good for these clients and what sort of benefits they specifically will gain.

    Link it back to the question, keep the client in mind and try to have an argument with yourself. That's how I got perfect marks in this stuff.

    For reference I did a BTEC in Software Development (D*D*D*) and A Level Computing (A) at College. This sounds like the stuff we did in the BTEC, having a bunch of clients like this. We'd have to build the network in packet tracer and talk about it.
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    I got D D D in my btec, find that it had more to do we what RAM is, binary, tech support etc. had not much to do with networks, I find the poor explanation/wording of the briefs I get is not too in depth. I have a virtulisation assignment too, which is just terribly worded.

    This is part of CCNA, which is a pain, specially the chapters.

    Got an IPsec/frame relay practical next week, which not many people got correct. Prefer servers and active directory any day.

    Your explanation of how to deal with this, since I was pretty much clueless before.
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    Ah we did the first part of the CCNA, several of the units made up with BTEC so there was crossover. I liked it and liked networking as a whole but the Cisco resources were horrible. It's really difficult to stay motivated reading through dozens of pages each week. That made it really boring.

    We did get quite a wide variety in the BTEC though. Had a few base networking units, stuff like cabling and types plus the CCNA. Had a lot of software (but then I choose software over hardware in my second year), business stuff, databases, data protection and legal and so on. Network Engineering was one of my choices for uni.

    You may benefit from looking into this:
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/CCNA-Routin...ng+study+guide

    Its a pretty hefty book but I've got a copy and it's super useful for cisco networking. If you intended to take those (or further exams) it would be pretty useful.

    Random image of a network we had to create. Similar premise to yours, various departments with X machines and services. Not many people could be bothered to build and configure the entire network. Unsurprisingly.
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    I like hardware, just cisco gets quite complicated, and I do think the cisco resources are horrible too, however I am motivated.

    Ill have to take a look at that book for next year for the honors... but I wont be choosing cisco to do as a dissertation. I do love security, like protecting servers etc. Stop hackers etc. That network diagram looks like madness haha and thats what puts most people of networking I guess.

    When it comes to the dedicated lines. Is it basically Public WANs vs Private WAN... If so , a leased line is public? Not sure about private.
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    Cisco offers nice enough qualifications but packages them horribly. I get there's lots of content but there must be easier ways than throwing walls of text at us.

    There's a bunch of other similar books (and books for other qualifications). They're pretty thorough and contain a lot of useful stuff providing you can filter it out. I had the tough decision of deciding between network engineering and computer forensics for Uni. Want to do a bit of both.

    It was madness and it wasn't even that great. Lots of bottlenecks and failure points. Seeing it really turned a lot of people off the criteria for that unit.

    To my knowledge dedicated just means it's dedicated to one thing. I guess you can have a public dedicated line and a private one. But dedicated lines seem to be more useful in private settings.

    Leased lines could be considered private or public, depending on where you are measuring. For example the small line going from my house to the nearest switch box would be a private line. It's for my house only and connects a private LAN in my house to the Internet. However if I were to lease the lines going from the switch box to somewhere else they'd probably be considered public since other people are using them. It's really subjective stuff I'm afraid.
 
 
 
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