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    I am Norwegian, so I do not know a lot about UK politics, but I would love to learn. I have no idea how the political system works, apart from that it struck me as kind of weird when the last election was covered (I do not remember why though ). It is boring to skim through a Wikipedia page about the UK political system, so I was just wondering from what newspapers can I learn the most about politics? Is there anything that is worth subscribing to? I mean one year ago I had no idea about US politics, now, on the other hand, I feel like I have a very good grasp of the political system after spending quite some time reading the NYTimes. What would be the British equivalent?
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    (Original post by selmss)
    I am Norwegian, so I do not know a lot about UK politics, but I would love to learn. I have no idea how the political system works, apart from that it struck me as kind of weird when the last election was covered (I do not remember why though ). It is boring to skim through a Wikipedia page about the UK political system, so I was just wondering from what newspapers can I learn the most about politics? Is there anything that is worth subscribing to? I mean one year ago I had no idea about US politics, now, on the other hand, I feel like I have a very good grasp of the political system after spending quite some time reading the NYTimes. What would be the British equivalent?
    As a general rule, newspapers vary depending on which views you have personally. If you're a social democrat, you may enjoy The Guardian.
    If you consider yourself right wing, then The Telegraph would be your best bet.

    For pure politics, I recommend Question Time, a BBC program, where they have representatives of multiple parties talking about different topics. For me, that would be the place to start.

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    I really like The Times more than The Telegraph. It isn't as biased, but it is good.
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    (Original post by That Bearded Man)
    As a general rule, newspapers vary depending on which views you have personally. If you're a social democrat, you may enjoy The Guardian.
    If you consider yourself right wing, then The Telegraph would be your best bet.

    For pure politics, I recommend Question Time, a BBC program, where they have representatives of multiple parties talking about different topics. For me, that would be the place to start.

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    I am an active member of Norway's like second most socialist party (only giving way to a borderline communist party), so I believe I am going to opt for The Guardian in that case.

    I will check out Question Time, thanks for the recommendation
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    In terms of learning about the UK political system there are actually a ton of really interesting and insightful youtube videos. Some of them may be slightly biased, but a lot less so than UK newspapers (I wouldn't read any one of them if you are looking for truly impartial news - even stuff like the Financial Times and The Economist are quite opinionated on certain issues, I would have recommended the Independent newspaper, but they have stopped printing it. For unbiased coverage I think the only real option is the BBC.

    CGP Grey (a Youtuber) supports voting reform in the UK and so does have a bias, but his explanations of the voting system currently used, as well as alternative ones are very accessible. In terms of how the UK political process works, the UK Parliament Youtube channel makes some handy videos as well.
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    (Original post by Jared44)
    I really like The Times more than The Telegraph. It isn't as biased, but it is good.
    Okay, unbiased is good. Personally, I really like NYTimes as they manage to stay unbiased (even though they are known to be a bit left of center), because they manage to write good and nuanced articles about e.g. Donald Trump without going all ad-hominem on him.
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    (Original post by Pro Crastination)
    In terms of learning about the UK political system there are actually a ton of really interesting and insightful youtube videos. Some of them may be slightly biased, but a lot less so than UK newspapers (I wouldn't read any one of them if you are looking for truly impartial news - even stuff like the Financial Times and The Economist are quite opinionated on certain issues, I would have recommended the Independent newspaper, but they have stopped printing it. For unbiased coverage I think the only real option is the BBC.

    CGP Grey (a Youtuber) supports voting reform in the UK and so does have a bias, but his explanations of the voting system currently used, as well as alternative ones are very accessible. In terms of how the UK political process works, the UK Parliament Youtube channel makes some handy videos as well.
    Wait, what, have they stopped printing The Independent? When did this happen?

    I love The Economist, but as you said they tend to be opinionated, so I prefer to read about issues that I already have some prior knowledge about. The UK political system would not be one of those "issues", heh.

    Thank you so much for the links, I will check them out!
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    (Original post by selmss)
    I am Norwegian, so I do not know a lot about UK politics, but I would love to learn. I have no idea how the political system works, apart from that it struck me as kind of weird when the last election was covered (I do not remember why though ). It is boring to skim through a Wikipedia page about the UK political system, so I was just wondering from what newspapers can I learn the most about politics? Is there anything that is worth subscribing to? I mean one year ago I had no idea about US politics, now, on the other hand, I feel like I have a very good grasp of the political system after spending quite some time reading the NYTimes. What would be the British equivalent?
    Off the top of my head, in Norway you vote for a party, who then ranks their own members, when over in the UK you actually vote for a local representative of your area, who is party affiliated. So famous MPs in the UK can lose their seat, while in Norway the party chooses who stays on.

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    (Original post by That Bearded Man)
    Off the top of my head, in Norway you vote for a party, who then ranks their own members, when over in the UK you actually vote for a local representative of your area, who is party affiliated. So famous MPs in the UK can lose their seat, while in Norway the party chooses who stays on.

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    Yes, that is about it.

    So how does it work with Parliament? In Norway it is more or less proportional - how many votes the party gets, that is how many seats it gets.
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    (Original post by selmss)
    Yes, that is about it.

    So how does it work with Parliament? In Norway it is more or less proportional - how many votes the party gets, that is how many seats it gets.
    Our House of Commons uses an electoral system called 'first past the post'.

    In this system the country is divided up into constituencies - currently 650. A single MP represents each one of these.

    When electing an MP, the winner is the person who gets the most votes. That's it. They don't need over half the votes - just the most. There was a famous example in Inverness back in 1992 where the winner got just 26% of the vote.

    The electoral system has come under sustained criticism because of the distortions it causes at national level, where geographic concentration rewards parties with extra seats as opposed to it being purely about the number of votes. For example, in 2015, the Conservatives formed a majority of MPs on just 36% of the vote, and the SNP got all but 3 seats in Scotland (over 90%) on barely over half the votes in Scotland.

    We had a referendum to move to AV back in 2011 but it was roundly rejected.

    Happy to answer questions about anything you like
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    Huh, actually, an even closer result just last year in Belfast South: an MP returned on just 24.5% of the vote.
 
 
 
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