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Tips for a female travelling alone Watch

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    I've just booked a 2 week journey through Europe. I'm female and travelling alone, so just wondering if anyone has any tips
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    I'd start here: https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice

    I'd like to think that you'd be reasonably safe in Europe but it depends where you're going to. Non-location-specific advice:

    Have a mobile with ICE & emergency service contacts for each place you're visiting. I'd probably recommend a cheapish phone you can stand to lose which has the ability to work with various sim cards. Ideally your UK service provider will give you good coverage abroad but it's certainly wise to check before you go (I know Three only seem to let you use your phone abroad if you tell them first).
    Google Maps is a great tool that helps navigation now you can download areas to use offline. I highly recommend you download the areas you'll be visiting if your phone has that ability (even if it just has GPS you can download free apps that let you set waypoints - do this whenever you change accommodation so you can find your way back even if you're lost; it doesn't even need the internet to work)

    Ensure you keep either friends or family updated with your whereabouts so they can raise the alarm if they don't hear from you for a period of time.

    Lock valuables away whenever possible & be wary of pickpockets. Definitely keep a close eye on your passport (I guess you'd have to contact the local UK Embassy if it was lost or stolen). If you heed the advice that you'd follow in the UK on a night out then you won't go too far wrong (not getting too drunk, being wary of strange men/women, ensuring you keep a close eye on your drink etc)

    European Health Insurance Car & Travel Insurance coverage

    Contact your bank before you go so they expect card use in multiple locations in a short space of time.

    Local language phrases - it helps to know them but most people will speak some kind of English on the continent.

    Maybe some kind of small first aid kit? Nothing too big but with the basics.

    Ensure you have a rough idea of local exchange rates so you don't get ripped off (if you're going outside the Eurozone anyways)

    I'm sure you'll have a great time.
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    (Original post by Tempest II)
    I'd start here: https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice

    I'd like to think that you'd be reasonably safe in Europe but it depends where you're going to. Non-location-specific advice:

    Have a mobile with ICE & emergency service contacts for each place you're visiting. I'd probably recommend a cheapish phone you can stand to lose which has the ability to work with various sim cards. Ideally your UK service provider will give you good coverage abroad but it's certainly wise to check before you go (I know Three only seem to let you use your phone abroad if you tell them first).
    Google Maps is a great tool that helps navigation now you can download areas to use offline. I highly recommend you download the areas you'll be visiting if your phone has that ability (even if it just has GPS you can download free apps that let you set waypoints - do this whenever you change accommodation so you can find your way back even if you're lost; it doesn't even need the internet to work)

    Ensure you keep either friends or family updated with your whereabouts so they can raise the alarm if they don't hear from you for a period of time.

    Lock valuables away whenever possible & be wary of pickpockets. Definitely keep a close eye on your passport (I guess you'd have to contact the local UK Embassy if it was lost or stolen). If you heed the advice that you'd follow in the UK on a night out then you won't go too far wrong (not getting too drunk, being wary of strange men/women, ensuring you keep a close eye on your drink etc)

    European Health Insurance Car & Travel Insurance coverage

    Contact your bank before you go so they expect card use in multiple locations in a short space of time.

    Local language phrases - it helps to know them but most people will speak some kind of English on the continent.

    Maybe some kind of small first aid kit? Nothing too big but with the basics.

    Ensure you have a rough idea of local exchange rates so you don't get ripped off (if you're going outside the Eurozone anyways)

    I'm sure you'll have a great time.
    Thank you! I'm going to need 3 currencies for my 2 weeks, which shall be interesting. Have you ever gone travelling alone?
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    I'm under qualified to give suitable advice for you, unfortunately,

    Be safe,
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    (Original post by Gapyearstudent54)
    Thank you! I'm going to need 3 currencies for my 2 weeks, which shall be interesting. Have you ever gone travelling alone?
    Not so much travelling although some members of my family have. I spent some time working abroad & I've been involved in a fair few expeditions.
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    (Original post by Tempest II)
    Not so much travelling although some members of my family have. I spent some time working abroad & I've been involved in a fair few expeditions.
    I never got how to work abroad! It all seems so complex! But that's so cool
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    Avoid dodgy areas, dont put yourself in risky situations like getting plastered, dont get into strngers card etc. in all sme precautions you'd take in your day to day life really... europe isnt very dngerous [well the west atleast]
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    If someone asks for your wallet, don't give it to them.
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    As others have said Europe's mostly fine but:
    Stay in crowded areas where possible, don't go off into side lanes alone unless necessary.
    Make sure you have emergency money in your shoes and in your phone case.
    Carry some form of ID with you at all times
    Use buses rather than random taxis - more for saving money but yeah this also helps safety wise
    Take sanitary toiletry items with you from the UK if you know you'll need them - they have a higher tax rate on them in other countries unless you wanna buy them at the duty free places in airports which is also fine.
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    (Original post by EricPiphany)
    If someone asks for your wallet, don't give it to them.
    😂 Awww darn, I love giving strangers my wallet😂
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    So I'm staying in hostels, and I've only just realised I have no clue what to do about food in the evening... One of the hostels gives free breakfast and dinner, but the other 4 don't...
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    Good luck and be safe.
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    Just read about the cities you're visiting (areas to avoid etc). You'll be fine in Europe. Get a cheap phone that works and don't go out with shady strangers haha.
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    > I have no clue what to do about food in the evening.

    What do you mean? You just get some food where ever you want. I like getting pre-made food at grocery stores when I'm on a trip alone, or stuff I can heat up and eat at the hostel. But you can also just eat at a restaurant. But I like to get food for take-away and eat it back at the hostel. You'll probably make some friends at the hostels who you can eat with. Asking people "hey where would be a good place to get something to eat tonight" would be a good conversation starter.
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    Since I think we have the safety advice well and truly covered, here's some advice for making the most of your time! I have travelled alone loads and love doing it, I put some time aside most years to go somewhere on my own.

    Get guide books from the library for where you are going (I like the rough guide) and take a notebook - write down all the things you really want to see as well as restaurants you want to go to. Being this organised means you can make sure you don't miss anything - personally I like to see all the sights first then spend the end of the time strolling about and enjoying the atmosphere of a new place.

    Decide whether you want to be sociable or whether you'd prefer your own space - staying in a hostel dorm is a great way to easily meet people. I like meeting people to go on nights out with rather than spending all my time with them. Alternatively, if you get an air b n b it is super cheap and you can have your meals in the apartment, which saves money - that's what I do most of the time. But more difficult to meet new people, if that's what you care about doing.

    Let me know if you've other questions!
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    I saw a nice little tip on a website once:If you're travelling on a train or bus or anything else, where sunglasses. If you go to sleep, intentionally or not, it might make the opportunist thief think twice as they cannot instantly see if your eyes are open/closed. Obviously if you're head is lolling about all over and you are drooling on your chin it might give it away that you're sleeping but its still a neat little tip you could try.
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    (Original post by Bern Herkins)
    I saw a nice little tip on a website once:If you're travelling on a train or bus or anything else, where sunglasses. If you go to sleep, intentionally or not, it might make the opportunist thief think twice as they cannot instantly see if your eyes are open/closed. Obviously if you're head is lolling about all over and you are drooling on your chin it might give it away that you're sleeping but its still a neat little tip you could try.
    I've planned it so my journeys are only 2 hours long, purposely so I don't fall asleep and lose all my possessions 😂 I did a journey last year with my boyfriend that was 16 hours, from Rome to Maastricht, we both ended up heads lulling to one side and drooling, I think the hideousness caused robbers to think twice 😂 It's really good advice though, thank you
 
 
 
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