media studies IS NOT A MICKEY MOUSE SUBJECT Watch

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goldenbarnes
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(Original post by -mb-)
What is that fateful sound I hear? Hark! It is the harsh tones of someone being wrong!

Media Studies is NOT an equal to Maths/Chemistry/History/English Literature/Insert Traditional Subject Here. Neither is it perceived as such such, nor should it ever be.

This is due to the content and scope of the courses; they do not demand the academic rigour of other subjects, and do not equip students with skills that universities value.

Even if I am wrong about this and they do have this rigour and teach important skills, it is an utter lie to say that any of the top unis, especially Cambridge treat a Media Studies A-level the same as, say, a Physics A-level. This is statement of fact.

Oh, wait....déja vu! I've said ALL this already on Page 29! :rolleyes:
There you will find it is the misleading nonsense spouted by pro media studies types that motivates me, rather than the very existence of the subject.

The idea that those who are somewhat impressionable might make a wrong decision because of the rubbish produced by ill-informed morons studying/suppporting Media Studies upsets me....

Incidently...
Mr Golden Barnes, you have NOT met a Cambridge tutor who has told you Media Studies is an equal to Maths et al, and that Cambridge will treat it as such.
If you still wish to claim that you have, why not tell us who they are, what their subject is, and at which college they are a tutor?

For those who can't be bothered to see what ground has already been covered, I'll just reiterate that Media Studies doesn't help you to a career in the media either, and that people who take Media Studies and get into decent university have either taken at least 3 other decent A-levels, or are reading a rather lightweight social science.

I hope that argues the watertight case for the "oh yes it is" corner with greater clarity than "courtyboy02" has managed to far with his (crap) use of a Thesaurus.

I must say I agree with the last point more than any of your others
Anyway, I'll see if I can answer your questions......

In year 11 when making my choices my Careesrs teacher made me ring an admissions tutor for Cambridge up and ask them myself about Cambridge. I did, and they told me what I've said here. I know you won't believe me when I say I don't know who they are, but hey ho...

However, I am able to recall the events of last month, when I went on a Law Summer School at Cambridge (which incidentally was one of the best weeks of my life). Now, I may have the woman's name wrong, but I'm pretty sure it was Rebecca Williams (I'll have a dig around later and find her name for definate) who told me that, as well as Dr Graham Virgo, an admisssions tutor for Downing College (IIRC) - both for Law. They both told me in no uncertain terms that Media Studies, Philosophy, Politics and Eng lit/lang (the subjects various students had asked about) were as valuable as any other subject. However, general studies, drama and something else were not. Art and Sport would be assessed individually as apparantley different exam boards have different styles and different ones offer more value.

There - I even got the hang of the bold function.....
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(Original post by goldenbarnes)
Well.........maybe the increase in Media Studies courses in the last 20 years has something to do with the increasing importance of the media in the last 20 years? No, hang on, that can't be right, it's far too obvious......
You have in the first clause of sentence two: "that can't be right".

It is because of the increasing pressure for more people to go into higher and further education and to achieve high greades, and the need to provide "trendy" subjects that appeal to people and look like an "easy option" in order to achieve this.
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(Original post by goldenbarnes)
I must say I agree with the last point more than any of your others
Anyway, I'll see if I can answer your questions......

In year 11 when making my choices my Careesrs teacher made me ring an admissions tutor for Cambridge up and ask them myself about Cambridge. I did, and they told me what I've said here. I know you won't believe me when I say I don't know who they are, but hey ho...

However, I am able to recall the events of last month, when I went on a Law Summer School at Cambridge (which incidentally was one of the best weeks of my life). Now, I may have the woman's name wrong, but I'm pretty sure it was Rebecca Williams (I'll have a dig around later and find her name for definate) who told me that, as well as Dr Graham Virgo, an admisssions tutor for Downing College (IIRC) - both for Law. They both told me in no uncertain terms that Media Studies, Philosophy, Politics and Eng lit/lang (the subjects various students had asked about) were as valuable as any other subject. However, general studies, drama and something else were not. Art and Sport would be assessed individually as apparantley different exam boards have different styles and different ones offer more value.

There - I even got the hang of the bold function.....
Yes, the bold function is jolly handy.

Um, well, I'm very surprised you had names to give me, and I'm far more inclined to believe you now, but I would still contest that this attitude is not one that you will find to be widespread in institutions such as Cambridge.

You haven't really responded to points about the fact that Media Studies is looked down upon in an already degree-saturated market, as well as at A-level, and that it doesn't get you a career in the Media either.

Then there's the issue of over-specialisation at too early a stage, before I even repeat the point about academic rigour.

Now, I might expect you to say that surely a Cambridge admissions tutor (inevitably better informed than me) has clearly judged these points not to count against Media Studies A-level, so what I say is redundant. (Are you going to say that?)
However, I ask you only this:
What is the role of a subject that is not abstract and/or does not involve high levels of logical thought and evaluation and so does not simply perform the role of mental development that Maths, or indeed History do, yet as a more specialised course does not actually facilitate your entry into a career involving that specialism?
If it's role is simply to better inform the next generation (who are doubtless interested) about the Media and how it works and its history, then why do we feel the need to make a supposedly "Gold Standard" qualification (i.e. an A-level) out of it?

People can learn about the media by observation i.e. by experience. Trying to "teach" Media seems rather like "teaching" current affairs.
There's nothing to "work out" like in Maths, and not a series of events, documented by sources of varying reliability to be crafted into an essay with some sort of conclusion answering a question, as in History.
There aren't even skills taught that might actually be used when pursuing a career in that field, as might be the case in IT.

Read some books, talk to some people and use your brain, and surely you then know about the Media?


I anticipate an interesting (and probably long) reply...
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goldenbarnes
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(Original post by -mb-)
Yes, the bold function is jolly handy.

Um, well, I'm very surprised you had names to give me, and I'm far more inclined to believe you now, but I would still contest that this attitude is not one that you will find to be widespread in institutions such as Cambridge.

You haven't really responded to points about the fact that Media Studies is looked down upon in an already degree-saturated market, as well as at A-level, and that it doesn't get you a career in the Media either.

Then there's the issue of over-specialisation at too early a stage, before I even repeat the point about academic rigour.

Now, I might expect you to say that surely a Cambridge admissions tutor (inevitably better informed than me) has clearly judged these points not to count against Media Studies A-level, so what I say is redundant. (Are you going to say that?)
However, I ask you only this:
What is the role of a subject that is not abstract and/or does not involve high levels of logical thought and evaluation and so does not simply perform the role of mental development that Maths, or indeed History do, yet as a more specialised course does not actually facilitate your entry into a career involving that specialism?
If it's role is simply to better inform the next generation (who are doubtless interested) about the Media and how it works and its history, then why do we feel the need to make a supposedly "Gold Standard" qualification (i.e. an A-level) out of it?

People can learn about the media by observation i.e. by experience. Trying to "teach" Media seems rather like "teaching" current affairs.
There's nothing to "work out" like in Maths, and not a series of events, documented by sources of varying reliability to be crafted into an essay with some sort of conclusion answering a question, as in History.
There aren't even skills taught that might actually be used when pursuing a career in that field, as might be the case in IT.

Read some books, talk to some people and use your brain, and surely you then know about the Media?


I anticipate an interesting (and probably long) reply...
For a start (predicatable response no.1) - it's not easy. And another (predictable response no.2), a lot of it is essay writing - 80% of the AS module was analysing, comparing and contrasting essay writing and the like.

Now, without wanting to sound patronising - do you know what Media Studies at A level is about?
This year (AS) we learned: what the media is, and our role in exams were to analyse what techniques the media uses, and how. Next year we will be adding 'why they do it' to that list.

Here comes a 'bolder'.........I read more History textbooks last year for Media than I did for History. I would havehad to read even more about Margaret Thatcher, but thanks to me already studying politics as well, I already knew most of that. The important thing about Media Studies is learning about the culture and society of the times when the text was produced, to understand more about it. So to understand things we've studied this year, we also had to know all about:
Thatcherism, apartheid, immigration (throughout the centuries), and currently Rupert Murdoch's involvement with the Labour government - in fact, most of my exam this year was based on the advantages and disadvantages of having a figure such as Rupert Murdoch in charge of various media institutions. Which brings me to my main point.

Media Studies is still an essay based subject. As stated before, 80% of this year's assessment was essays. Even the practical unit contains a brief (a plan) and an evaluation. All these essays have the same AOs as a History on English essay - it's not as if you get the same marks for writing a lower standard of essay in Media.

What I will say, is it is easier than most other subjects, History for example. But in the same way Advanced Maths is harder than Maths, or (most people would say) Physics is harder than Biology. But what Media Studies definately isn't is a Mickey Mouse subject. And from my experience at least, it definately is held in the same esteem by Universities as any other qualification.
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(Original post by goldenbarnes)
For a start (predicatable response no.1) - it's not easy. And another (predictable response no.2), a lot of it is essay writing - 80% of the AS module was analysing, comparing and contrasting essay writing and the like.

Now, without wanting to sound patronising - do you know what Media Studies at A level is about?
This year (AS) we learned: what the media is, and our role in exams were to analyse what techniques the media uses, and how. Next year we will be adding 'why they do it' to that list.

Here comes a 'bolder'.........I read more History textbooks last year for Media than I did for History. I would havehad to read even more about Margaret Thatcher, but thanks to me already studying politics as well, I already knew most of that. The important thing about Media Studies is learning about the culture and society of the times when the text was produced, to understand more about it. So to understand things we've studied this year, we also had to know all about:
Thatcherism, apartheid, immigration (throughout the centuries), and currently Rupert Murdoch's involvement with the Labour government - in fact, most of my exam this year was based on the advantages and disadvantages of having a figure such as Rupert Murdoch in charge of various media institutions. Which brings me to my main point.

Media Studies is still an essay based subject. As stated before, 80% of this year's assessment was essays. Even the practical unit contains a brief (a plan) and an evaluation. All these essays have the same AOs as a History on English essay - it's not as if you get the same marks for writing a lower standard of essay in Media.

What I will say, is it is easier than most other subjects, History for example. But in the same way Advanced Maths is harder than Maths, or (most people would say) Physics is harder than Biology. But what Media Studies definately isn't is a Mickey Mouse subject. And from my experience at least, it definately is held in the same esteem by Universities as any other qualification.
Well, what you say is fair enough, and I'm not going to directly contradict your facts, as my school doesn't even offer the subject, and I obviously don't take it.
Yet I'm happy to say that I'm not a hypocrite, as I think you'll agree I made my criticisms carefully; simply discussing tha value of what it's actually possible to do within the constraints of "Media Studies", rather than guessing about course content.

I am slightly bemused that you've now admitted that the subject is "easier" than other more tradititonal A-levels that you yourself have studied. If this is so, why do you still thinks it's right that it is/should be valued just as highly as maths, when you yourself say it doesn't demonstrate the same acievement? Surely there's no justification for "holding it in the same esteem"?

You still haven't really said what role Media Studies plays as an A-level i.e. you haven't really tackled the italics from my previous post.

Now I'll pass judgement on the nature of the studies that you describe yourself as having undertaken this year:
To me (without wishing to be insulting) it sounds simply like a mix of General Studies (current affairs/very recent history debate - Thatcher & apartheid), Politics (media moguls - Murdoch) and history/english-style analysis of text.
Yet I can't help feeling that that content andthose skills could all be taught as well if not better, and probably in greater depth, by studying:
English Language
Later Modern History
Politics
Newsnight ()

There's no point in lumping all these skills together, and skimming over them at such an early stage and calling it an A-level. These aspects of your course sound like they would do better as constituent parts of other courses, to be brought together at university/in later life.

Anyway, it sounds like you're taking some other serious subjects, that you admit are more demanding...so why defend Media Studies so fiercely; if it's just a supplementary subject, thens surely you've got a good sense of proportion of Media Studies' relative merit anyway?

As I've said already...don't generalise too much from what you've been told by a couple of people in one faculty of one university (even if it is a presitigious one).

And finally, a general interest question or two:
- You say you studied Thatcherism?
Was the course flexible enough to fit in some analysis of the nature of the (British) media coverage of the death of Ronald Reagan, and the perceptions of the "Iron Lady" 15-odd years on? If yes, what did you conclude, what comparissons could be made with her media image when she was in office?

- To what extent do you study the Media of other countries, and the different way in which they present news about Britain (e.g. USA)? Does this tie in with studying their political systems? Are language students at an advantage, being able to read foreign media and comment on them?
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mr_tomus
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YES IT IS
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It is
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Dajo123
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(Original post by NDGAARONDI)
It is
naughty.
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NDGAARONDI
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(Original post by Dajo123)
naughty.
How is it?
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ChemistBoy
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(Original post by goldenbarnes)
Well.........maybe the increase in Media Studies courses in the last 20 years has something to do with the increasing importance of the media in the last 20 years? No, hang on, that can't be right, it's far too obvious......
Prominance, not importance, don't confuse the two. I don't really wan't to argue that Media studies is any easier than more traditional subjects as I don't know. It's just that we have a society that is highly dependant on science and technology, yet we are producing fewer scientists and technologists than before. Personally I don't think we need a larger media, it already causes enough damage.
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Cellardore
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For God Sake do you lot ever stop whining?
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RetrowolfUK
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I took AS Media Studies. I was predicted a U grade, but I bumped my final result up to a D, and I'm proud! Media Studies is not an easy subject. Why people think it's so easy, I don't know. Lots of people have said to me 'All you have to do is write reviews on movies' Bulls**t! You may be writing 'reviews', but you have to go into extreme depths. In the exam, you're strapped for time, and huge essays are expected of you. (I can't remember, but I think the exam is only 90 mins long). It's difficult to do, and people shouldn't knock it - at least not until they've done it for themselves and resulted in an A* grade.
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Lucy4Happiness
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Hiya all Ive just read some of the posts on the subject of whether or not media studies is a mickey mouse subject. Ive just spent the past week getting 1 of my teachers 2 change one of my classes (GCSE's)from business studies to media studies (it was thankfully done b4 any lessons in either so i didnt miss anything). Theres 31 pages to this ''debate'' so I havent read it all but i have read many of the earlier and latter pages. I do not think its a Mickey MOuse subject and that its easy to pass, as I no it would have been very hard 2 do in-depth essays as many ppl ahve said. Ppl have told me GCSE's arents really looked at but at my skule they hyped it up coz if u dont get the grades collegueswant then u mitenot get in. wen u r saying things like AAB and AAA does that mean A's n B's in A-levels? wat do u do at college? is it uni's u do a-levels? wats the difference betweens A'levels n degrees? :confused: :confused: Im very interested in Media n thats y i wnated 2 do it 4 GCSEs but i cnat help feelin a little dishearted wen ppl say its a 'mickey mouse ' subjetc n mock it saying ''david beckham studies'' :mad: :eek: n stuff like that.
i think it wilb valid wen im older but sum ppl on here r saying every1 will ahev degrees so they wont mean mcuh anymore, well then wats the point in taking them? wta else r we menat 2 do? is ther anything higher than a degree? maybe i shudnt go in2 media after all, even though its wat ive ALYWAS wanted 2 do..... :eek: cant believe i jsut said that!!! (well typed it)
The Truth is i want to do media and be involved in Media wen im older but is it necessary 2 go 2 college or uni or where ever the hell ur meant 2 go 2 do further study, cant u jsut get str8 in2 it n learn the rest on the job? But if i study media n then find i cant get into a good uni then wats the point in doing it? going to a uni not considered gud isnt going 2 b useful watsoever wen i go 4 a job later on wen ive left.....i wnat to do media tho! Ive had 2 lessons of it n the teacher ive got is really gud!! ive got him 4 the whole of my GCSE course(2years ) so that shud b ok seeing as tho hes not a teacher 2 let u sit n chat all lesson every lessons all year li esum teachers do.

Please cud ppl doing a media degree or w/e it is advise me on how they got in2 it n wat u have 2 do n wat they think wud b an option 4 me 2 do. If your just gonna **** off Media Studies and say i shudnt have picked it then theres not much point u telling me that coz its not the stuff im lookin2 find out, if u no wat i mean.
Thanx Every1
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Danielle_89
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Lucy, if you want a career in the media, you don't have to do Media Studies! I'm in the same year as you and was going to take Media until my school suddenly declined to offer it as a GCSE, which, although I was upset at the time, was a blessing in disguise.
I want to be a journalist, but I now realise Media Studies is not necessary - I do History, French and Sociology, plus the standard ones like English and Maths - but there is no direct route into journalism. And yes, in answer to your question, I believe you can train on the job.
You do A levels at your school's sixth form or a sixth form college, and a degree at Uni.
If you want to do Media Studies (as you said) then carry on, although I doubt you could change your option again, but even if you do give it up, you can still have a career in the media.
If you don't want Unis to look at it and think of it as a 'Mickey Mouse' subject, perhaps don't do it at A level?
I hope you're not so confused now.
Danielle x
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kellywood_5
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OK, I know this thread is very old, but it interested me to see the sort of thing people would come out with when arguing either for or against media studies, so after having read all the posts (yes, I was bored!) I shall now add my own comments.

Although I don't study media studies at AS level, I did it at GCSE. I didn't want to, but my school had a silly system of making us choose our options from particular cateogries, one of which was expressive arts. The other options were art, music, drama, PE or dance, all of which are seen as 'mickey mouse.' As I am much more academic than I am creative and would have preferred to choose another humanity or social science instead, media studies was the only one I thought I might be good at and even enjoy. How wrong I was! By the end of the first year, 19 out of 20 of us, including me, couldn't stand it. It was by far the most boring subject I did, even worse than maths, science and food technology, and I really struggled with it. It wasn't the teacher's faults as they were both quite good, but no matter how hard I tried, I wasn't really getting it. At first I thought I was doing okay as I got a B in my Year 10 exam, so I was pretty shocked when I got an E in the mock, as were my teachers, friends and family. I was completely gutted, felt like crying and from that point on, I kind of gave up. Not meaning to sound arrogant, but I've always been a good student and never imagined I'd get any grade below a C, so that experience really shook me. Although, as I said, I really felt like givng up, I realised as the exams loomed that that was a really bad attitude to have and I shouldn't give up on a subject, even one I didn't like, just because I wasn't that good at it. So I started working harder and revising for the exams. After I'd done them, I resigned myself to doing badly anyway because I didn't even finish one of the exams and didn't think they'd gone at all well. I'd been predicted a C and really wasn't expecting to get it, but knew I'd done my best...then on results day I was gobsmacked to see I'd achieved a B! That was higher than anything I could even have hoped for, and I was really happy. I didn't care about media studies because I hated it and knew I didn't want to carry on with it, but I still wanted to do my best.

The moral of this long story is that I HATE arrogant and ignorant people who dismiss other people's subjects as 'mickey mouse', often without even having studied them! And even if you have studied them, just because YOU found it easy doesn't mean other people necessarily will. We're all different, and what some people find hard, others find easy. If media studies is really so 'mickey mouse', why did only 1 person get an A, one person get a B (me!), a handful of people get Cs and the rest Ds, Es, Fs, Gs and Us? Surely if it's so 'mickey mouse', we would have all got A*s? Now you could argue that everyone in my class is thick and lazy, but (again, not meaning to brag) I've always been called a geek because I love schoolwork and work so hard, and I got 7 A/A* grades at GCSE, including English literature, science, French and history. Although one of my AS subjects is sociology, which some people also see as 'mickey mouse', my 3 other subjects are French, English literature and history, all traditional and very well-respected. So I don't think you can call me thick. 1 of the other students in the class got the highest GCSE results in the school and the others were mostly 5 or more A*-C students. So there goes the argument that only thick people or the underachievers choose media studies. I challenge everyone on this board who thinks media studies is such a doss to go and do a GCSE/AS/A level in it...when you come out with an A*/A after doing no work or revision, maybe people will take you slightly more seriously. Until then, I think everyone should grow up and learn to respect other people's subject choices. Assuming you're better or more intelligent than somebody else just because YOU think your subjects are harder and worth more is just plain stupid and arrogant. Since the sciences involve no essay writing skills, I bet you wouldn't find 30-mark exam questions using complex language and technical vocabulary you probably don't even know the meaning of 'mickey mouse!'



Quote:
Originally Posted by courtyboy02
Well Leanne, if that is your real name, I beg to differ with you about your view on the veraciously deplorable subject known as media studies. I am not a hypocrite, because I partially participated in a media studies course at my school. I left the afore-mentioned course due to it's reputation in universities, that is, respected universities, not some new age university that specialises in subjects such as 'Media Studies', 'General Studies' 'Surfing Studies' or of course, everyone's favourite 'David Beckham Studies'. These are known as 'Mickey Mouse'.This term applies to all subjects that are likely to get you laughed at by the interviewers at most universities; as these are subjects that a vegatative monkey on a diet of anabolic steroids and McDonald's 'real' chicken nuggets would easily pass, communicating via a series of stephen hawking-esq grunts and their own flatulence.

Of course, a university such as Northampton may vehemently respect these subjects, the course of media studies will floor cleaner with Al Jazeera TV. If you wish to obtain the career that you obviously wish to achieve, I would suggest you access your personal file, tear out your current media studies performance; however good, and take new subjects that are actually not laughed at by proper universities and the teachers of proper subjects.

The only way you will get a career worth anything with a media studies degree is if you fulfil all of the tick-boxes on an employers specifications on how to get special un-discriminative grants.

Since I doubt you are a State educated, Black Welsh Female in a temporary vegitative state with glasses, hearing aids, no limbs whatsoever, an orphan with a troubled up-bringing who also happens to have an IQ of 187 which I doubt is likely as you chose media studies, and anyone with an IQ of at least 60, knows media studies is a waste, you have the comparative intelligence of a dog.

You'd better hope you get another chance at life because in this one, it looks like you'll be on about eleven pounds seventeen pence monthly, if you're lucky.

Next time, try choosing Physics, Maths or to a slightly lesser extent History.

Thank you,


P.S. However much I'm in a hurry, I can still use the apostrophe correctly without omitting it in the word "can't"

You may now reply with outrage.



Oh my God, this post made me soooo Again, have you done media studies for long enough to result in a qualification in it? No; you dropped it. Maybe it was really because it was too hard for you and you gave a bullsh*t excuse to save face....or maybe you're just a quitter. Either way, you can't say that ANYONE, even a monkey!, could pass it until you have evidence of that. Don't make idiotic comments with nothing in that empty inflated head of yours to back them up.

If universities and teachers turn their noses up at media studies, they're just being as snobby, arrogant and closed-minded as you are.

Now you say that people who choose media studies are stupid and have the intelligence of dogs. Well, I don't know my exact IQ, neither do I know how intelligent dogs are- although I'm sure they're more intelligent than morons like you, which wouldn't exactly be hard!- but I have 10 GCSE passes at A*-C, 7 of which are A/A*, and also an AVCE in ICT taken 2 years early. The others in my class were by no means thick either.

Employers do not only look at qualifications, but personal qualities as well, and since you are a smug, arrogant, full of yourself ********, the starter of this thread has much more chance of getting a job than you do- just about anyone does! And correcting people's English just makes you look like an even bigger twit who has nothing better to do, and is so insecure he has to put other people down to make himself feel better. *cough* PATHETIC LOSER *cough*

I might have known you'd be a science student! I know that not all of them are like this, but so many science students are arrogant snobs who think they're superior to everyone else just because they play around with figures and chemicals rather than words. I'm not denying that the sciences are hard and I know I'd struggle with them, but that doesn't give you the right to put down arts students and make them feel inferior. The arts and the sciences are DIFFERENT; neither set of subjects is harder or better, they just test different skills and people are good at different things. Has any of this penetrated your thick head...probably not.

P.S. Anyone who wants to take media studies, business studies, general studies or any less respected subject; go for it! Don't let arrogant morons with their heads stuck up their own arses put you off.
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sarah_999
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argh i hate it when people saying its easy or whatever
you cannot compare it to other subjects cos it is totally different!
i always had my doubts about media studies but im doing it for a level .. and im really interested in it .. why is media important? well .. because you are bombarded with it every day, all day, and its all advertising, all about money...its cool to learn what certaincompanies try to feed you and make you consume.
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Lucy4Happiness
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To Danielle,
I STILL don't know how to use the quote icon so Im just having to remember my interpretation of what you said and the words you used to say it! Your advice was great thanx alot! Whats sociology? Ive heard it mentioned on here a few times but I don't know what it is, they don't offer it at my school. Although they do offer Health and Social, Textiles, Systems and Controls, Child Development and suchlike subjects which are all ineresting in their own way, but however I think they are only useful for a restricted career path. If Sociology is considered a Mickey Mouse subject like Media Studies often is then why have you taken it? That means you are confident that you can persue a career and get a good job and get into college's and uni's with this as a GCSE. I also do drama which I have just read is sometimes considered a Mickey Mouse subject! I am feeling very down about this now! The GCSE subjects I am doing are -
Maths (and probably Statistics a year early)
English, which counts as 2 (which I tihnk includes English Literature)
Science, which also counts as 2,
Media Studies,
Drama,
ICT (which is 4 GCSE's) and
History (which Im taking a year earlier than the normal so that I can do an AS level in history in year 11 which is when I will be sitting my other GCSE's.
Danielle you said I can take my A-levels at my Sixth Form. This brings a problem. As my school doesn't ahve a Sixth Form. What does this mean for me? I can go to another Sixth Form but it will mean travelling by car or bus everyday, as a pose to walking.
To be honest I don't wnat to have to go to college after school I want to go straight into work. However I think it would be beneficial for me to have a degree. The problem is a don't know what to study for this degree! I don't want to continue with History because although at times it's very interesting it's not something I wnat to involve in my entire life as a major factor of my life, if you know what I mean. I adore dancing but I did not go to tap dancing or ballet lessons when I was younger or anything so I should image I would eb at a major disadvantage if I was to try dancing. I think I will still enjoying dancing, the way I do now, when I am much older, if I do not persue a career in it, so I'd rather not do that as a degree. Drama is a tough one as although it interests me greatly, in certain aspects, I do not think it would be very beneficial for me (especially as its considered a ''Mickey Mouse'' subject!!!!!). Media studies - hmmm, now that is considered a ''Mickey Mouse'' subject as well but I am not so bothered about that fact in media studies as I am in drama as i think it isn't true with media studies, although when it comes to drama I can understand why some people may consider it to be a ''Mickey Mouse'' subject. So media would be a good choice - but I have heard that it contains lots of analysing etc etc and other things people have said make it sound like its all written work, revising and research; wheras I am not so interested in that aspect of Media. I would not liek to continue doing Science or English to a degree standard really, especially not science. I wouldn't really like to continue with ICT either. The only reason why I choose ICT is because it is considered to be an absolute necessary! I now don't think that way but its too late so I'm not too bothered about that - even if it is a waste of 4hours in school and however many hours of homework i get, per week. So that leaves just maths which, without bragging, I am ''exceptionally'' good at. I did actually manage to achieve 3 levels above the high average that people my age are expect to get but I don't think it's that big of a deal really. I've heard accountants are on really good money though so this interests me deeply!! Although I think it may get a little boring after however many eyars where as Media is always changing as it evolves so that would be different. As you have probably gathered it is a complex issue. Lol. However I am very glad of your advice and if you don't want to reply that is ok although I'd really really like you too!! Lol.
Hope to hear from you a.s.a.p!!!

To Kellywood 5,
Well I was going to comment on the length of you post but after writing this post its probably about the same length anyway! Your post was very good by the way and as long as it took to read it all I was glad I did so well done for that. Im replying to your post to ask you if you really do think studying Media at an A-level standard is better than working on the job after leaving school. I would love to go straight to work after elaviong school as my mum and dad aren't wealthy enough to support me when it comes to student loans or whatever. I sort of need cash rather than spending loads as I've heard it can be many years until you have paid it off - as many as 15, if not more in some cases!!
So really I'm just looking for advice. If you ahve any please let me know.
Thanx for reading it all!!
Lucy
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Lucy4Happiness
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To Kellywood 5,
I just said that my post was probably as long as yours but I've just looked and its only about a third of the size! You must have been tping yours for about 20minutes!! And thats only if you're a quite fast typer, which I should image you are to have stayed writing that!
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(Original post by Lucy4Happiness)

To Kellywood 5,
Well I was going to comment on the length of you post but after writing this post its probably about the same length anyway! Your post was very good by the way and as long as it took to read it all I was glad I did so well done for that. Im replying to your post to ask you if you really do think studying Media at an A-level standard is better than working on the job after leaving school. I would love to go straight to work after elaviong school as my mum and dad aren't wealthy enough to support me when it comes to student loans or whatever. I sort of need cash rather than spending loads as I've heard it can be many years until you have paid it off - as many as 15, if not more in some cases!!
So really I'm just looking for advice. If you ahve any please let me know.
Thanx for reading it all!!
Lucy
Hi. My post is very long lol, but I had a lot to say; I didn't know it was going to be that long when I started it, but I kept thinking of other things I wanted to add. I am a fast typer, and it included a reasonably long quote as well. I'm glad you liked it though!

If you want to do A levels and then maybe even go to uni, you shouldn't let the cost put you off. You can get up to £30 a week, plus up to £500 in bonuses over the 2 years, for doing A levels, and if you got a part time/holiday job as well, you'd probably have saved up quite a bit before you went. The tuition fees have just gone up and will come into effect from 2006, so I'll be one of the first people to experience it :rolleyes: but it means you don't have to pay anything back until you're earning £15 000 a year or more. It will take a long time to pay off, but should be worth it if you get a decent job.

HOWEVER....for some reason, the media usually take a dim view of media studies, which is where the 'mickey mouse' stereotype actually came from. Although 70% of journalists and many other jobs in the media have degrees, they are usually in a traditional and more well-respected subject such as English. The reason media studies is seen as pointless is because it doesn't lead you into careers in the media. If you're interested in being a journalist, either a degree in English and a postgraduate course in journalism or joining a newspaper straight from school and working your way up might be better. As for other jobs in the media, it might be worth speaking to a careers advisor to see if they can get some information for you.
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To Kellywood 5,
I don't wnat to be involved in journalism really the part of media I am interested in is the actual Tv presenting and hosting. I know that this is a very hard and competetive career to get into so I am prepared to start at the very very bottom and work my way up as high as I can! However I don't fancy the idea of further schooling such as college and A-levels! But I do like the idea of saying I have a degree. I realise that as people get older their GCSE's seem less and less importantant and when Im 30 if GCSE's are the highest qualifications I have I know this isn't considered very good at all. This is a reason why I want a degree but what can you take degree's in which are invlolved in teh media or things which would be useful - like, for instance, you mentioned English? How many A-levels do you ahve to have to be able to study for a degree? I am doing an AS level when Im meant to be doing my GCSE so that will give me an advantage but Ill still have to do another year on that subject (which, by the way, is History) as well as two years in two other subjetcs - but what subjects can you take? I'm not confused exactly but rather...erm I can't think of a word for it. What Im trying to say is O don't know what Im emant to do to gfet the qualifications, like where do you go for A-levels and degree's, Im not in the 'know'. Thanx for all your help so far please continue with it lol.
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