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    I'm currently in Y10 and my younger sister is going to go to an all-girls selective grammar school into Year 7 in September as she passed her 11+ entrance exam. And in her to-be grammar school, some boys are accepted via grades: but I have an option to be Head Girl in school, but I don't think I can make it the application is due in tomoz. So, I was wondering if any grammar school sixth formers (who weren't Head boys/girls, but I don't mind) could give me tips for a successful application to her grammar school as soon as I turn Y11 Thank you.
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    (Original post by ShiawaseNekox3)
    I'm currently in Y10 and my younger sister is going to go to an all-girls selective grammar school into Year 7 in September as she passed her 11+ entrance exam. And in her to-be grammar school, some boys are accepted via grades: but I have an option to be Head Girl in school, but I don't think I can make it the application is due in tomoz. So, I was wondering if any grammar school sixth formers (who weren't Head boys/girls, but I don't mind) could give me tips for a successful application to her grammar school as soon as I turn Y11 Thank you.
    This really depends what the school requires from applicants (every school is different and can set their own criteria). Obviously if you have entrance exams, try and find out which exam board the school will be using as this is usually a past paper, or a few questions from different past papers. If the school requires a personal statement, you can use the uni personal statement builder tool on TSR but just change the uni to the sixth form name. In a personal statement they're looking to see that you are academically capable of sitting these A Levels, that you are well-rounded (hobbies and interests outside of school), and why you want to go to grammar school and this school in particular.
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    (Original post by Charlotte49)
    This really depends what the school requires from applicants (every school is different and can set their own criteria). Obviously if you have entrance exams, try and find out which exam board the school will be using as this is usually a past paper, or a few questions from different past papers. If the school requires a personal statement, you can use the uni personal statement builder tool on TSR but just change the uni to the sixth form name. In a personal statement they're looking to see that you are academically capable of sitting these A Levels, that you are well-rounded (hobbies and interests outside of school), and why you want to go to grammar school and this school in particular.
    Thank you for the advice, are you also a grammar school 6th former? Were you head girl or student ambassador?
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    (Original post by ShiawaseNekox3)
    Thank you for the advice, are you also a grammar school 6th former? Were you head girl or student ambassador?

    No, I'm at university now, I went from state to private school for sixth form and was house captain
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    (Original post by Charlotte49)
    No, I'm at university now, I went from state to private school for sixth form and was house captain
    House captain... oh wow, you're amazing...
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    (Original post by ShiawaseNekox3)
    House captain... oh wow, you're amazing...
    Honestly, it wasn't difficult. As long as you come across as being genuinely interested in getting involved and have good ideas for events/activities/improvements then you've got a fair chance at getting some sort of leadership role.
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    (Original post by Charlotte49)
    Honestly, it wasn't difficult. As long as you come across as being genuinely interested in getting involved and have good ideas for events/activities/improvements then you've got a fair chance at getting some sort of leadership role.
    Well, I did have a chance to become student ambassador (an assistant to the Head students), but there were too many applicants who were better than me in academics and everything, so I thought there's no point.
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    (Original post by ShiawaseNekox3)
    Well, I did have a chance to become student ambassador (an assistant to the Head students), but there were too many applicants who were better than me in academics and everything, so I thought there's no point.
    I definitely wasn't one of the best students academically, but I did well in the interviews. I suppose it depends on your school's selection criteria.
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    (Original post by Charlotte49)
    I definitely wasn't one of the best students academically, but I did well in the interviews. I suppose it depends on your school's selection criteria.
    Do you mind giving me tips for interviews? As I'm approaching university soon in 3 years
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    (Original post by ShiawaseNekox3)
    Do you mind giving me tips for interviews? As I'm approaching university soon in 3 years
    I think that the only way to actually prepare yourself mentally for interviews is to practice them. I did a lot of volunteering, and had a few leadership roles within both my schools and in my hobbies so was well-practiced in interviews. Practicing only really works with someone of authority, but most are quite happy to do a mock interview for you. It helps to have some sort of method to keep yourself calm (there are numerous guides online for this so I won't go into it), I'm now naturally not a nervous person, which helps me significantly.

    Make sure you're well-presented, but not uncomfortable. If you make yourself wear a suit you'll feel uncomfortable, I tend to wear a nice shirt and some cropped trousers, but make sure you keep your own style. You're aiming to come across as genuine and friendly - being confident isn't important. There is definitely a difference between calmness and confidence - it's easy to try fake confidence and look cocky. Read up on etiquette for interviews, make sure you always introduce yourself, remember the interviewer's name and use it, and make sure you've researched the role/position well. Hope this helps
 
 
 
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