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    Hi guys

    I went for some experience in ultrasound today and tried a little scanning. The sonographer told me that they can usually tell if someone is going to be able to scan within seconds.

    Cutting to the chase - I was hopeless - couldn't find the kidneys despite copious research and observations.

    Any tips for developing practical ultrasound skills and probe fineness?
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    experience, thats all you can really do. out of all imaging, I think ultrasounds are the most diffficult to interpret!
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    (Original post by Mr Student)
    Hi guys

    I went for some experience in ultrasound today and tried a little scanning. The sonographer told me that they can usually tell if someone is going to be able to scan within seconds.

    Cutting to the chase - I was hopeless - couldn't find the kidneys despite copious research and observations.

    Any tips for developing practical ultrasound skills and probe fineness?
    Depends what you are hoping to get out of the ultrasound, but it all takes a bit of time to get used to - how much pressure to put on the probe, how to search for things with the probe, like anything it needs practice. If you are a medic there aren't many times as a junior you would be using ultrasound yourself. I am happy using ultrasound to site a cannula if I am up **** creek and can't get find a good vein - thats pretty straight forward and starts to give you a feel for how to use ultrasound and what the images look like.
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    It's not a skill many doctors need. Cardiologists tend to do their own echos and obstetricians can usually scan, radiologists can obviously do it, but otherwise if you want to be an expert in ultrasounds you maybe want to study radiography not medicine.
    If this was just work experience as a school student I wouldn't worry about it.
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    Does it matter? The minimal exposure you get to ultrasound as a medical student doesn't exactly equip you to use one- and there are qualified radiologists, radiographers or obstetricians whose job it is to interpret scans.
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    (Original post by taysidefrog)
    It's not a skill many doctors need. Cardiologists tend to do their own echos and obstetricians can usually scan, radiologists can obviously do it, but otherwise if you want to be an expert in ultrasounds you maybe want to study radiography not medicine.
    If this was just work experience as a school student I wouldn't worry about it.

    (Original post by navarre)
    Does it matter? The minimal exposure you get to ultrasound as a medical student doesn't exactly equip you to use one- and there are qualified radiologists, radiographers or obstetricians whose job it is to interpret scans.
    I am partial to radiology as a specialism and I think ultrasound would be an asset. I want to be able to refer, perform, and diagnose using it ... and use it for intervention (needle guidance/drain insertions etc.)
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    (Original post by Mr Student)
    I am partial to radiology as a specialism and I think ultrasound would be an asset. I want to be able to refer, perform, and diagnose using it ... and use it for intervention (needle guidance/drain insertions etc.)
    Those are skills that you will develop (apart from referrals) as a radiology trainee. You won't get enough exposure to develop, nor maintain, those skills as a student and nor should you bother. Yes it is good to have interests, but if you focus too much on a niche area and not enough on the bread and butter of medicine, you won't pass your med school exams.
 
 
 
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