studywolf1
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does anybody know any good revision methods for studying English lit? poetry and two books. I cant seem to think of anthing
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aidanjt
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What are the books?
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HollyKipling
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For the prose, create mindmaps of themes with quotes and page references.
Revision cards or posters for character profiles and chapter summaries are good.
Looking at exemplar answers helps me so that I can see what the best way to structure my answers is.
Actually doing practise questions is very important and if you do them under exam conditions you can work on your exam technique whilst doing so.
For poetry, annotate all the poems and for each poem highlight a few of the main themes and write a few paragraphs about them in the poem. This will make it easier when it comes to the exam as you'll have already written paragraphs about certain themes so shouldn't find it hard to select another poem for comparing.
I hope this was some help.
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studywolf1
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(Original post by HollyKipling)
For the prose, create mindmaps of themes with quotes and page references.
Revision cards or posters for character profiles and chapter summaries are good.
Looking at exemplar answers helps me so that I can see what the best way to structure my answers is.
Actually doing practise questions is very important and if you do them under exam conditions you can work on your exam technique whilst doing so.
For poetry, annotate all the poems and for each poem highlight a few of the main themes and write a few paragraphs about them in the poem. This will make it easier when it comes to the exam as you'll have already written paragraphs about certain themes so shouldn't find it hard to select another poem for comparing.
I hope this was some help.
okay thankyou
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Davide_online
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(Original post by studywolf1)
does anybody know any good revision methods for studying English lit? poetry and two books. I cant seem to think of anthing
It's not easy to learn good revision methods for Eng Lit, so don't be hard on yourself (if you are).

Here is a list of suggestions. Some of them may seem obvious, but sometimes we overlook or undervalue it.

1. Re-read the poetry and books and have a basic understanding of their meaning. A good test, for poetry especially, is to be able to paraphrase the meaning of each stanza or section as you go along.

2. That done, come up with some ideas about their themes. What keeps coming up a lot in the texts? Marriage? Death? Social position? Sometimes the author's preface provides help- for example, I've just finished reading Thomas Hardy's 'the Woodlanders' and the author's preface speaks of 'matrimonial divergence', so themes in respect of love and marriage can reasonably be expected in that novel.

3. Then, look for the places in the text where there is a crisis or major incident connected to the themes, especially involving the main characters. Think deaths, births, marriages, bankruptcies, major illness, exile etc. What do the main characters do and say, and how do they change?

4. Study these particular passages well and try to have your own ideas about them- rather than relying on the views of critics and authors of study guides.

5. Practice shaping this 'core material'- your detailed understanding of key passages illustrating themes- to fit the requirements of past questions.

I hope this helps.
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studywolf1
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(Original post by Davide_online)
It's not easy to learn good revision methods for Eng Lit, so don't be hard on yourself (if you are).

Here is a list of suggestions. Some of them may seem obvious, but sometimes we overlook or undervalue it.

1. Re-read the poetry and books and have a basic understanding of their meaning. A good test, for poetry especially, is to be able to paraphrase the meaning of each stanza or section as you go along.

2. That done, come up with some ideas about their themes. What keeps coming up a lot in the texts? Marriage? Death? Social position? Sometimes the author's preface provides help- for example, I've just finished reading Thomas Hardy's 'the Woodlanders' and the author's preface speaks of 'matrimonial divergence', so themes in respect of love and marriage can reasonably be expected in that novel.

3. Then, look for the places in the text where there is a crisis or major incident connected to the themes, especially involving the main characters. Think deaths, births, marriages, bankruptcies, major illness, exile etc. What do the main characters do and say, and how do they change?

4. Study these particular passages well and try to have your own ideas about them- rather than relying on the views of critics and authors of study guides.

5. Practice shaping this 'core material'- your detailed understanding of key passages illustrating themes- to fit the requirements of past questions.

I hope this helps.
thank you I will definitely try out these tips
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