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    How does it work? I mean, when do you study and sit for your O-levels and A-levels? And what the hell is a "sixth-form"?
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    Reception
    Primary school - SAT's
    Secondry school - GCSE's
    College or "sixth form" - A levels, AVCE, NVQ's etc
    Universtity - Degree
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    O levels were replaced with the GCSE in 1987.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    O levels were replaced with the GCSE in 1987.
    1986.
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    (Original post by shift3)
    How does it work? I mean, when do you study and sit for your O-levels and A-levels? And what the hell is a "sixth-form"?
    where do you live?
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    (Original post by Cellardore)
    where do you live?
    Jordan.

    It goes like this here:
    Grades 9 & 10: GCSEs
    Grade 11: AS levels
    Grade 12: A2 levels
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    (Original post by shift3)
    How does it work? I mean, when do you study and sit for your O-levels and A-levels? And what the hell is a "sixth-form"?
    SATS are basically meaningless exams taken so the government can monitor performance.

    GCSE's are the first important formal qualification, you spend around 5 years in 'secondary school', three of those are general preperation for all subjects. Then the last two are the GCSE course years, between ages 14-16. You sit the exams in the summer of the second year.

    A Levels are again a two year course, more difficult and more intensive than A Levels. The student can choose the subjects they do. You sit one part of the examinations in the summer of your first year, pass those and you get an 'AS-Level (Advanced Subsidary)' qualification in your subjects. In the second year you take the exams again in the summer and if you pass get an Advanced Level Qualification.

    Degree then follows from age 18, normally a 3 but often 4 year course. Divided into BA (Arts) and BSc (Science), 4 year courses tend to get you an MA (Masters).
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    (Original post by shift3)
    Jordan.

    It goes like this here:
    Grades 9 & 10: GCSEs
    Grade 11: AS levels
    Grade 12: A2 levels
    We use 'Years' here
    Year 6 = SATS
    Year 9 = SATS
    Years 10, 11 = GCSE
    Years 11, 12 = AS/A2 (Sixth Form)
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    (Original post by Fry)
    We use 'Years' here
    Year 6 = SATS
    Year 9 = SATS
    Years 10, 11 = GCSE
    Years 11, 12 = AS/A2 (Sixth Form)
    I assume you mean 12/13 for 6th form
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    Ah, thanks guys. I was under the impression that UKers start A-levels in college, after the graduate from high school.

    (Original post by hornblower)
    1986.
    I don't know for certain, but couldn't you both be right.. I mean GCSE (& presumably O-levels) are/were two year courses so there would have been a period where the Y10 were doing GCSEs and Y11 were doing O-levels?

    So one of you could mean the year the first GCSE course was taught, and the other the first year no O-level exams were taken.
 
 
 

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