Mel79
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
I have chosen my provisional A levels. I picked Maths, Chemistry, Biology and Physics.
I am considering a career in medicine (possibly psychiatry), psychology, engineering (mostly aerospace or possibly mechanical) or related jobs.
My friend says I should do A level Further Maths, as I could cope with the work, and it is good for engineering.
I am currently doing double award science, and am aiming for an AB result, possibly AA.
Should I change my A levels based on these grades? Are the A levels appropriate for the careers I am considering?
Any help about what A levels I should do or what the subjects are like at A level is greatly appreciated.
0
reply
AndrewKn0x
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 years ago
#2
(Original post by Mel79)
I have chosen my provisional A levels. I picked Maths, Chemistry, Biology and Physics.
I am considering a career in medicine (possibly psychiatry), psychology, engineering (mostly aerospace or possibly mechanical) or related jobs.
My friend says I should do A level Further Maths, as I could cope with the work, and it is good for engineering.
I am currently doing double award science, and am aiming for an AB result, possibly AA.
Should I change my A levels based on these grades? Are the A levels appropriate for the careers I am considering?
Any help about what A levels I should do or what the subjects are like at A level is greatly appreciated.
Regarding the further maths thing, it's really difficult to say. I'm in AS now and I have my year 12 exams coming up and I do four now and I can't even imagine having to worry about a fifth. Unless you find maths easy or you really really enjoy it, I would say go for it as long as you have a work ethic and are determined to reach the end goal i.e. your future career. I have found four to be hard and I am a hard worker and I always try my best so I would check with various universities (I know it's early) to just make sure that you could get in with just maths and without further maths. What I would do, I would do the four you've selected, then in A2 after you've dropped one (I'm assuming you'll probably want to drop one) pick further maths up as an AS! Regarding your GCSE grades, no you shouldn't. I got AB in science and I do both Biology and Chemistry. I'll tell you, they're hard. There's no denying it. BUT, you're eased in with relatively simple stuff and then it gets harder once you know the rate at which you work so you can organise your time better and denote more work to those subjects, if you get what I mean? So what I'm saying is to start with, AS is easy and it gets harder once you become more familiar with it all and change the way you work accordingly (by that I mean, change how you answer exam questions and adapt to the new material in general). So don't change your subjects because of your grade! If you enjoy these subjects, take them. If you are considering psychology, maybe take up psychology? Just a suggestion? You don't have to because it's not essential to do it at uni but I do it and it's very interesting and not too difficult - might be something to consider since your subjects are very heavy in terms of content and difficulty! Hope this helped!
1
reply
Mel79
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#3
(Original post by AndrewKn0x)
Regarding the further maths thing, it's really difficult to say. I'm in AS now and I have my year 12 exams coming up and I do four now and I can't even imagine having to worry about a fifth. Unless you find maths easy or you really really enjoy it, I would say go for it as long as you have a work ethic and are determined to reach the end goal i.e. your future career. I have found four to be hard and I am a hard worker and I always try my best so I would check with various universities (I know it's early) to just make sure that you could get in with just maths and without further maths. What I would do, I would do the four you've selected, then in A2 after you've dropped one (I'm assuming you'll probably want to drop one) pick further maths up as an AS! Regarding your GCSE grades, no you shouldn't. I got AB in science and I do both Biology and Chemistry. I'll tell you, they're hard. There's no denying it. BUT, you're eased in with relatively simple stuff and then it gets harder once you know the rate at which you work so you can organise your time better and denote more work to those subjects, if you get what I mean? So what I'm saying is to start with, AS is easy and it gets harder once you become more familiar with it all and change the way you work accordingly (by that I mean, change how you answer exam questions and adapt to the new material in general). So don't change your subjects because of your grade! If you enjoy these subjects, take them. If you are considering psychology, maybe take up psychology? Just a suggestion? You don't have to because it's not essential to do it at uni but I do it and it's very interesting and not too difficult - might be something to consider since your subjects are very heavy in terms of content and difficulty! Hope this helped!
Thanks very much for the reply! I really want to study both Chemistry and Biology, and definitely think I will do maths. Unfortunately my current school doesn't have the option of A level psychology, but I applied for another school as well which does have it. What is psychology like at A level?
0
reply
AndrewKn0x
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 years ago
#4
(Original post by Mel79)
Thanks very much for the reply! I really want to study both Chemistry and Biology, and definitely think I will do maths. Unfortunately my current school doesn't have the option of A level psychology, but I applied for another school as well which does have it. What is psychology like at A level?
It really depends on your exam board! I'm on WJEC and it's a new spec. I find it really interesting and relatively simple really. If you memorise the material in detail and just regurgitate in the exam you'll do well! There is a lot to remember though and a lot of people do struggle with the memorisation side of things. To give you an idea, we have to know 7 studies off by heart which all have an aim, methodology, findings, conclusions and evaluations, we have to know the principles of psychological therapies e.g. drug therapy, how they work, the evaluation. We have to know the five psychological approaches (biological, behaviourist, psychodynamic, cognitive and positive), their assumptions and how they apply in therapy. We need to be able to evaluate each approach and compare and contrast them with the other approaches. In unit 2, there is a 20 mark essay which needs to be memorised and it can be one out of the five you need to know along with a whole section on research methods which involves little memorisation and mainly application and understanding. Sorry if this scared you If you have really good revision techniques that allow you to memorise things effectively, it'll be easy. I find it relatively simple, thanks to flashcards!!
0
reply
Mel79
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#5
(Original post by AndrewKn0x)
It really depends on your exam board! I'm on WJEC and it's a new spec. I find it really interesting and relatively simple really. If you memorise the material in detail and just regurgitate in the exam you'll do well! There is a lot to remember though and a lot of people do struggle with the memorisation side of things. To give you an idea, we have to know 7 studies off by heart which all have an aim, methodology, findings, conclusions and evaluations, we have to know the principles of psychological therapies e.g. drug therapy, how they work, the evaluation. We have to know the five psychological approaches (biological, behaviourist, psychodynamic, cognitive and positive), their assumptions and how they apply in therapy. We need to be able to evaluate each approach and compare and contrast them with the other approaches. In unit 2, there is a 20 mark essay which needs to be memorised and it can be one out of the five you need to know along with a whole section on research methods which involves little memorisation and mainly application and understanding. Sorry if this scared you If you have really good revision techniques that allow you to memorise things effectively, it'll be easy. I find it relatively simple, thanks to flashcards!!
I think I'll consider psychology then, it definitely sounds like my type of subject. Thank you very much!
0
reply
AndrewKn0x
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#6
Report 4 years ago
#6
(Original post by Mel79)
I think I'll consider psychology then, it definitely sounds like my type of subject. Thank you very much!
You're welcome! Good luck!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Current uni students - are you thinking of dropping out of university?

Yes, I'm seriously considering dropping out (131)
14.7%
I'm not sure (40)
4.49%
No, I'm going to stick it out for now (268)
30.08%
I have already dropped out (22)
2.47%
I'm not a current university student (430)
48.26%

Watched Threads

View All