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    Hello guys,

    Recently, I've been very curious about studying abroad because I would like to experience a new culture (korean, specifically), and also see how being an international student is like...
    What I would like to know is...
    1. How does a student from London become an international student for a university like Seoul university?
    2. Are there any requirments (grades etc.) to become an international student - if so, what?
    3. What are the pros and cons of being an international student?
    4. Do universities give out scholarships for international students?

    Feel free to answer 1 or more of the questions
    Thanks in advance for your answers 😄
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    Why not go to the seoul uni website and donwload their guide for international students?
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    my korean isnt good enough to understand it
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    (Original post by Emrek)
    my korean isnt good enough to understand it
    Never mind, its in english - well that answers about three on the questions !
    Thanks I just assumed it was in korean and it would have difficult words..
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    Are you doing A-levels now?

    You can either apply directly to these international universities to do your full course there or do a study abroad year at a UK university. If you applying directly, I think you would have to get an equivalency certificate or some sort if the country does not recognise A-levels. Are you looking at the University of Seoul or Seoul National University?

    I think the easier route may be to do a year abroad through a UK institution. I did my second year abroad, which fortunately for me was fully accredited as it was my university's abroad campus. We also had the option to do a year abroad in a tonne of other universities (including Seoul I think), but it was not accredited, so you would have to take an extra year when you came back to the UK. As far as I'm aware most universities in the UK offer study abroad options.

    Hope you find your answers, studying abroad is really fun!
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    (Original post by Neptuner)
    Are you doing A-levels now?

    You can either apply directly to these international universities to do your full course there or do a study abroad year at a UK university. If you applying directly, I think you would have to get an equivalency certificate or some sort if the country does not recognise A-levels. Are you looking at the University of Seoul or Seoul National University?

    I think the easier route may be to do a year abroad through a UK institution. I did my second year abroad, which fortunately for me was fully accredited as it was my university's abroad campus. We also had the option to do a year abroad in a tonne of other universities (including Seoul I think), but it was not accredited, so you would have to take an extra year when you came back to the UK. As far as I'm aware most universities in the UK offer study abroad options.

    Hope you find your answers, studying abroad is really fun!
    Thank you for your answer, I am not doing A levels at the moment - I'm about to finish my GCSEs - I just wanted to find out the details ahead of time so I could know what I am doing when the time comes. If you dont mind, could you maybe describe how it was like for you;
    Where did you go?
    Where there other international students who could speak english?
    What did you struggle at most while living there?
    Did you get a job while studying abroad?
    Did the grades you get at gcse and A levels effect whether you were allowed to study abroad?
    Sorry for the overdose of questions(also seoul national university) - you seem very experienced and thanks in advance for your answer.
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    (Original post by Emrek)
    Thank you for your answer, I am not doing A levels at the moment - I'm about to finish my GCSEs - I just wanted to find out the details ahead of time so I could know what I am doing when the time comes. If you dont mind, could you maybe describe how it was like for you;
    Where did you go?
    Where there other international students who could speak english?
    What did you struggle at most while living there?
    Did you get a job while studying abroad?
    Did the grades you get at gcse and A levels effect whether you were allowed to study abroad?
    Sorry for the overdose of questions(also seoul national university) - you seem very experienced and thanks in advance for your answer.
    I went to Malaysia so everyone there spoke English. I interacted a little more with the local students rather than sticking to the UK bunch. English comprehension was fluent with other students and near-fluent with most locals. The biggest struggle was the homesickness at first because it was the other side of the world, but once you get over that first week or so you won't want to go home! Living abroad, especially outside Europe, is a shock to the system at first.

    I didn't get a job as the cost of living was very low there. Food and accommodation were cheap in comparison to studying in the UK. The grades that they asked for were 70%+ (a 1st) in your first year to make sure that your grades wouldn't dip too much, however I know others on my course transferred with 60-70%. So it will really only be your university performance that they will consider, given that your A-Levels/GCSEs would have been looked at to get into the university in the first place.

    If you are looking to apply directly to an international university then it probably varies a lot, although I suspect many will be able to accept A-Levels with some sort of conversion. I'm having a little trouble finding the entry requirements for SNU. I think it's considered the best in Korea so I suspect the entry criteria may be fairly high. I'm also not sure what percentage of courses there are taught in English. I think it may be a good idea to shortlist some universities that offer the course/s you may wish to do, if they offer it in English, their fees, and what their entry requirements are. I do still think however, that the easier route would be doing a transfer year after enrolling at a UK university. Either way I'll be happy to offer any help and wish you the best in your future studies!
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    (Original post by Neptuner)
    I went to Malaysia so everyone there spoke English. I interacted a little more with the local students rather than sticking to the UK bunch. English comprehension was fluent with other students and near-fluent with most locals. The biggest struggle was the homesickness at first because it was the other side of the world, but once you get over that first week or so you won't want to go home! Living abroad, especially outside Europe, is a shock to the system at first.

    I didn't get a job as the cost of living was very low there. Food and accommodation were cheap in comparison to studying in the UK. The grades that they asked for were 70%+ (a 1st) in your first year to make sure that your grades wouldn't dip too much, however I know others on my course transferred with 60-70%. So it will really only be your university performance that they will consider, given that your A-Levels/GCSEs would have been looked at to get into the university in the first place.

    If you are looking to apply directly to an international university then it probably varies a lot, although I suspect many will be able to accept A-Levels with some sort of conversion. I'm having a little trouble finding the entry requirements for SNU. I think it's considered the best in Korea so I suspect the entry criteria may be fairly high. I'm also not sure what percentage of courses there are taught in English. I think it may be a good idea to shortlist some universities that offer the course/s you may wish to do, if they offer it in English, their fees, and what their entry requirements are. I do still think however, that the easier route would be doing a transfer year after enrolling at a UK university. Either way I'll be happy to offer any help and wish you the best in your future studies!
    Thank you for being so helpful, most of the stuff you said realy helped my understanding
 
 
 
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