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    In the course i'd ideally like to do it states

    "Successful applicants must also have GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, with at least grade B."


    on the Learndirect website in the qualification equivalency post it says

    "Level 4This is similar to a Higher National Certificate (HNC).And also:
    • Certificate of Higher Education
    • "
    Level 4 would be higher than a A Level i believe as it states level 3 would be equivalent of a A Level...

    i plan to study for a
    "
    • Certificate of Higher Education in Computing & IT and Mathematics
    "

    This coming academic year, to then use this certificate of higher education as a Access to HE Diploma.

    so would i be aloud to use the certificate of higher education in computer & IT and mathematics for the access to HE Diploma, as well as The Mathematical equivalent, or is this way to much to ask for? thanks!
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    (Original post by irdanknight)
    In the course i'd ideally like to do it states

    "Successful applicants must also have GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, with at least grade B."


    on the Learndirect website in the qualification equivalency post it says

    "Level 4This is similar to a Higher National Certificate (HNC).And also:
    • Certificate of Higher Education
    • "
    Level 4 would be higher than a A Level i believe as it states level 3 would be equivalent of a A Level...

    i plan to study for a
    "
    • Certificate of Higher Education in Computing & IT and Mathematics
    "

    This coming academic year, to then use this certificate of higher education as a Access to HE Diploma.

    so would i be aloud to use the certificate of higher education in computer & IT and mathematics for the access to HE Diploma, as well as The Mathematical equivalent, or is this way to much to ask for? thanks!
    You need to ask the university concerned directly if this is acceptable. Universities decide what is suitable.

    Requirements for gcse maths and English are sometimes linked to funding restrictions or external accreditation or simply because they know students will struggle to get a graduate job without gcses.

    If you take a certHE this will use up your gift year of student finance meaning you will be unfunded if you change your mind or need to repeat a year later on. Is there a reason that you're looking to take certHE and not an access course with resitting gcses?
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    Just to add to the above.

    If you get a CertHE, this is the equivalent of the first year at uni (Level 4). If you wanted to do a full degree later then you will fall foul of the Equivalent or Lower Qualifications rule of Student Finance. You would not get full funding for the first year and would have to fund yourself - including paying your own tuition fees.

    Also I agree that the requirement for GCSE English and Maths is rarely negotiable these days - although it is always worth checking direct with unis. Grade Cs in both indicate a basic level of literacy and numeracy and as PQ says, these tend to be used by employers as well as unis. Unis largely stopped accepting GCSE equivalents from UK candidates, a couple of years ago.

    However as PQ says, it is something that unis will decide for themselves. There are no overarching rules, so cobtacting Admissions Offices direct is the way to go.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    Just to add to the above.
    (Original post by Klix88)

    If you get a CertHE, this is the equivalent of the first year at uni (Level 4). If you wanted to do a full degree later then you will fall foul of the Equivalent or Lower Qualifications rule of Student Finance. You would not get full funding for the first year and would have to fund yourself - including paying your own tuition fees.


    Wait it falls short for requirements for funding? why is this? as i thought if it was accepted by the uni, funding is okay, as long as your UK born, and can provide a background history on yourself (work, school, houses, ect...) no?
    I'm not too clued up about all of this so am requiring loads of help. but thank you for this.


    (Original post by Klix88)

    Also I agree that the requirement for GCSE English and Maths is rarely negotiable these days - although it is always worth checking direct with unis. Grade Cs in both indicate a basic level of literacy and numeracy and as PQ says, these tend to be used by employers as well as unis. Unis largely stopped accepting GCSE equivalents from UK candidates, a couple of years ago.

    However as PQ says, it is something that unis will decide for themselves. There are no overarching rules, so cobtacting Admissions Offices direct is the way to go.


    I heard it isn't very negotiable, thats why i wanted to check before being cheeky and applying with it.

    although my ideal uni of choice states "Successful applicants must also have GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, with at least grade B."

    and does not say anywhere about english, so i believe this would be accepted no?

    i already have a grade C in Maths although this clearly falls short.
    thanks




    (Original post by PQ)
    You need to ask the university concerned directly if this is acceptable. Universities decide what is suitable.Requirements for gcse maths and English are sometimes linked to funding restrictions or external accreditation or simply because they know students will struggle to get a graduate job without gcses.If you take a certHE this will use up your gift year of student finance meaning you will be unfunded if you change your mind or need to repeat a year later on. Is there a reason that you're looking to take certHE and not an access course with resitting gcses?


    erm, i suppose i just assumed this would be my best option, as it would look the best on the application for university and also, would take the same amount of time??


    if anybody has any advice on what they would do that would be amazing, as all this is leading me a bit clueless and confused

    anyhow, thanks everybody for helping


    I thought maybe it would be a lot easier to explain to everybody my ideal path of uni.

    so originally i was going to do a Open University course, studying Certificate of Higher Education in Computing & IT and a second subjectlink : http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/qualif...course-details

    upon completion, i was planning to go onto sussex uni to do :
    MComp Computer Science
    link :http://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/underg...-science-mcomp

    could anybody advise other routes that would be better for me, as well as a reason why,
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    (Original post by irdanknight)
    Wait it falls short for requirements for funding? why is this? as i thought if it was accepted by the uni, funding is okay, as long as your UK born, and can provide a background history on yourself (work, school, houses, ect...) no?
    No, I'm afraid not.

    Everyone gets a set number of years of Student Finance in their lifetime. There isn't unlimited funding for uni-level study. Under the ELQ ("Equivalent or Lower Qualifications") rule, you cannot get SF funding for a qualification which is equivalent to, or lower than, one that you already hold. A CertHE is the equivalent of the first year at uni. If you followed your plan above and got a CertHE to begin with, you therefore wouldn't get funding to do the equivalent level of study a second time. That would be the first year of a full degree, which you would have to pay for yourself. Your full SF entitlement would kick back in for your second and third years.

    I heard it isn't very negotiable, thats why i wanted to check before being cheeky and applying with it.
    It's definitely the uni you need to check with. When it comes to equivalence to stated requirements, every uni can set its own rules. Candidates from a non-standard academic background can have decisions made on a case-by-case basis. But it would be unusual to find GCSE Maths and English Grade C requirements waived for someone who had been educated in the UK.

    although my ideal uni of choice states "Successful applicants must also have GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics, with at least grade B."

    and does not say anywhere about english, so i believe this would be accepted no?
    Only the uni could tell you. However, it sounds like you are looking at a course-specific set of requirements. You may find that there are more general requirements at uni-level which include GCSE English at C or above. It would be very unusual to come across a degree these days which didn't have this, but you should definitely check direct with the uni.

    I would take that Maths B grade requirement seriously as well.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    No, I'm afraid not.

    Everyone gets a set number of years of Student Finance in their lifetime. There isn't unlimited funding for uni-level study. Under the ELQ ("Equivalent or Lower Qualifications" rule, you cannot get SF funding for a qualification which is equivalent to, or lower than, one that you already hold. A CertHE is the equivalent of the first year at uni. If you followed your plan above and got a CertHE to begin with, you therefore wouldn't get funding to do the equivalent level of study a second time. That would be the first year of a full degree, which you would have to pay for yourself. Your full SF entitlement would kick back in for your second and third years.


    I would take that Maths B grade requirement seriously as well.
    i will most definitely take most of this up with the university thank you.

    although, is there any other path you would choose to avoid losing the funding for first year?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by irdanknight)
    i will most definitely take most of this up with the university thank you.

    although, is there any other path you would choose to avoid losing the funding for first year?

    Thanks
    The one year Access to Higher Education qualification would seem to be a logical option. It's a single-use Level 3 qualification, specifically designed to give students an entry point for uni. Unis will give conditional offers based on Access grades. Most colleges will also suggest that you take/retake Maths and English GCSEs alongside the Access course, so you could satisfy all uni requirements in the same year.

    You can't get financial help for living expenses during an Access course. However ithere is age-dependent funding available for tuition fees. If you are 24+, you can get the 24+ Advanced Learning Loan. This gets wiped out if you go on to graduate from uni. More info on funding here:
    http://www.nus.org.uk/en/advice/mone...et-in-england/

    Do beware that Access courses come in different subjects. You will need to check with your prospective uni that a) they will accept Access from applicants (most do), and b) what type of Access course they need for the course you're looking at. Then you need to find a college near you which offers that specific type of Access course.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    The one year Access to Higher Education qualification would seem to be a logical option. It's a single-use Level 3 qualification, specifically designed to give students an entry point for uni. Unis will give conditional offers based on Access grades. Most colleges will also suggest that you take/retake Maths and English GCSEs alongside the Access course, so you could satisfy all uni requirements in the same year.

    You can't get financial help for living expenses during an Access course. However ithere is age-dependent funding available for tuition fees. If you are 24+, you can get the 24+ Advanced Learning Loan. This gets wiped out if you go on to graduate from uni. More info on funding here:
    http://www.nus.org.uk/en/advice/mone...et-in-england/

    Do beware that Access courses come in different subjects. You will need to check with your prospective uni that a) they will accept Access from applicants (most do), and b) what type of Access course they need for the course you're looking at. Then you need to find a college near you which offers that specific type of Access course.
    PRSOM
 
 
 
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