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    Hi, i have just taken my GCSEs and have been choosing my AS level subjects, I would quite like to take biology and chemistry, but i'm not sure whether i'd cope with them, I have done double award science at GCSE and will probably get a B grade.
    Just wondered if anyone takes these subjects and if they think i could cope if i got a B at GCSE, I have heard they are both very hard.
    Thanx a lot
    lv laura
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    (Original post by lozzy100)
    Hi, i have just taken my GCSEs and have been choosing my AS level subjects, I would quite like to take biology and chemistry, but i'm not sure whether i'd cope with them, I have done double award science at GCSE and will probably get a B grade.
    Just wondered if anyone takes these subjects and if they think i could cope if i got a B at GCSE, I have heard they are both very hard.
    Thanx a lot
    lv laura
    I did triple science GCSE and got BBB and have just finished AS bio. I was predicted a B and think i have got it. I got an A in my first module! So anything is possible. Biology is just endless amounts of facts.
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    i did double award science and I took bio and chem for A level

    biology shouldnt be that much of a problem, theres a lot of it but as long as you keep on top of the material a B grade at least is easily acheivable.

    In our school anyone with a double B grade or lower in double award science is not allowed to take chemistry at A level, such is the nature of the subject. Its best to find out which chemistry board your school takes, we take nuffield which is regarded as the hardest, and after the first 5 chapters we found that GSCE chemistry was really a bit of a fairytale. Also, at the beginning of this year, our chem teacher ran us all in to the ground by showing us a chart which outlined that over the last 2 years, no one with a B grade or lower in the chem GSCE paper has gotten above a C at A level.

    If you choose to take chemistry, make sure that you give it the most priority; after our synoptic paper a few days ago a lot of people realised that they had blown chemistry to such an extent that they wont make either of their 2 uni offers.

    and dont take A level maths and chemistry unless you're extremely gifted at both of them. Maths is probably the most unrewarding subject, i took it for AS and when the exam period came around, I had to ditch revising for my other subjects for the sake of maths. And after 4 months of solid maths revision day and night I only just managed to scrape a B by one mark
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    (Original post by lozzy100)
    Hi, i have just taken my GCSEs and have been choosing my AS level subjects, I would quite like to take biology and chemistry, but i'm not sure whether i'd cope with them, I have done double award science at GCSE and will probably get a B grade.
    Just wondered if anyone takes these subjects and if they think i could cope if i got a B at GCSE, I have heard they are both very hard.
    Thanx a lot
    lv laura
    Go for it. At least A-grades would've helped, but you'll get up to speed anyway - if you put the work in.
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    do it, go on just do it
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    I did Bio and Chem at AS level and found them really intertesting subjects...although it'll depend on your syllabus. Chemistry is definately harder, but Biology has a high workload - that's what I thought anyway. Chemistry is a really good A level to have, it's useful for loads of things.
    Biology gets a lot more demanding at A2 though, Chemistry kinda gets a bit easier, I thought, or it just stays the same.
    I think you should go for it
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    Bio's fairly easy if you keep on top of the work. It's the volume of content that makes the subject overwhelming, not the difficulty of it.
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    (Original post by Ellie4)
    Bio's fairly easy if you keep on top of the work. It's the volume of content that makes the subject overwhelming, not the difficulty of it.
    Very well said - If you're a hard worker and wanting to do Biology, even if you're not that clever, it's worth doing.
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    (Original post by Ellie4)
    Bio's fairly easy if you keep on top of the work. It's the volume of content that makes the subject overwhelming, not the difficulty of it.
    Yep, and i found a lot of the questions in the exams this summer to be quite vague, which is weird since the OCR syllabus is so precise in its objectives. Lol i sound so posh hhaaha
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    (Original post by SiAnY)
    Yep, and i found a lot of the questions in the exams this summer to be quite vague, which is weird since the OCR syllabus is so precise in its objectives. Lol i sound so posh hhaaha
    Unit 3 was vague on Edexcel, a ridiculous excuse for a paper. Who wants to write for an hour about methane?! :rolleyes: Unit 1 and 2 was what I was expecting though, stuck to the syllabus and was just recall really.

    I say go for bio lozzy100, as long as you have enough interest in the subject to learn the facts and do the work, you'll be just fine. Aspects of chemistry are in it (albeit simple chemistry), so the two subjects go nicely together. Good luck with your decision
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    If you're a B grade at GCSE you won't get an A or B or AS chemistry probably, unless you're awful at physics and that dragged you down. I know i sound really harsh, but i got A*'s hopefully in double award science and am not picking chemistry because i may not get an A in it, if you're intrested in it that may help and my advice isn't too accurate probably. Biology isn't my place and other people have adviced on it anyway. My choice is physics, i guess not everybody has the same opinions as me about that.
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    Biology is fine at AS as long as you revise well, but chemistry is a bit harder, although by no means impossible. I have found that biology is significantly harder at A2, unlike chemistry. Just remember that if you want to study a sceince course at university you will need at least two science or maths subjects at A-level and a few of the more popular universities say that they would prefer three. Also, it is difficult to study a biological science without chemistry, and if you want to study chemistry it might be a good idea to take maths. Make sure you check with uni prospectuses if you want to take science any further, which I hope you do!
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    thanx a lot guys for your advice,
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    Unless you really like chemistry, stay away from it. I personally didn't do it, because I only have an interest in organic chemistry and everything else bores me to death, but many friends of mine did; most of them wish they didn't, however.

    I did AS biology, and it was quite enjoyable except for little bits here and there (especially in unit 2b) that were really dull and tedious. Would I recommend it? Yes.
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    Hmm...everyone seems to have had stricted grade requirements than our school. You can get into any science A-level with CC gcse grades - I think they even allowed lower for physics. Then again, I think they only require about 3/4 C grades in anything to do A-levels at our 6th form.

    As I've said before, it can depend on the syllabus, teachers and other students in the class.

    Chemistry (Salters - the hardest chem course ) can be very complicated and dull. You really have to understand the chemical concepts because exam questions seem to test how you can apply knowledge. The maths can be very dull of calculation questions. It was the subject I really wanted to drop at the beginning of AS, but it got better.

    Biology (OCR), as others have said, is mainly about memorising facts (at least at AS level). There is a lot of work, but if you keep ontop of it, the subject can be fairly easy. However, there are some very, very boring parts IMO.

    The subjects do go together quite well though
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    hmm,
    I took Chemistry, Biology, Maths and Physics.
    Biology is the easiest but most timeconsuming by far. But, its also my favourite subject, so its not all bad. As long as you have enough time to commit the facts to memory and do some application too, you will be fine.
    Chemistry is the second easiest, it can get boring at times, but generally its worth doing.
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    First of all are you lot kidding me??

    The hardest Chemistry course is the AQA specification and I know from many Oxford dons that this is the common perception. There are many topics in the AQA course which aren't included on any of the others because they are considered difficult. AQA also has the lowest coursework component, which is annoying.

    Salter's and Nuffield are both very accessible courses for intermediary candidates but the A grade is hard to obtain because you have to show such a level of application.

    Regarding Chemistry A Level; GCSE double award- esp. if you did a modular spec (he he) is such a joke that you cannot assume anything. One of my friends got an A*A* but is heading for an E in AS Chemistry. However, what must be emphasised is that you need to be v.good at calculation to handle AL Chem.
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    (Original post by lozzy100)
    Hi, i have just taken my GCSEs and have been choosing my AS level subjects, I would quite like to take biology and chemistry, but i'm not sure whether i'd cope with them, I have done double award science at GCSE and will probably get a B grade.
    Just wondered if anyone takes these subjects and if they think i could cope if i got a B at GCSE, I have heard they are both very hard.
    Thanx a lot
    lv laura
    Look at the syllabus for a few exam boards and decide whether you would like the topics covered. Chemistry can be really fun if you have the right lecturer, if you have a bad one it will be boring and difficult/confusing.

    I suggest you ask people who haved study Chemistry at the same institution you are intending on going to and ask them what the lessons are like, for example does the teacher explain core concepts well.

    The calculations aren't that bad either, they tend to look more difficult than they really are:


    A geologist wanted to determine the percentage purity of a sample of limestone (calcium carbonate) by reacting it with sulphamic acid, H3SO3N. However, he did not know how many hydrogen atoms had acidic properties and so decided to investigate this by reacting sulphamic acid with sodium carbonate solution.

    He made up a solution of sulphuric acid containing 1.50 g in 250 cm3 of solution and titrated a 20.0 cm3 sample with 0.025 M sodium carbonate using a suitable indicator. 24.8 cm3 of sodium carbonate solution was required for complete reaction.

    Sodium carbonate and hydrogen ions react as indicated in the equation below:

    CO32- + 2H+ => H20 + C02

    Calculate the number of moles of replaceable hydrogen atoms in one mole of sulphamic acid.

    Molar mass of sulphamic acid = 97 g mol-1 [1]
    Therefore no. of moles of sulphamic acid used = 1.50 g /97 g mol -1 = 0.0155 mol [1]
    Therefore no. of moles of sulphamic acid in 20 cm3 = 20 cm3/250 cm3 x 0.0155 mol = 0.00124 mol [1]
    No. of moles of sodium carbonate used = 0.00062 mol [1]
    Therefore no, of moles of hydrogen ions present = 0.00124 [1]
    Therefore one mole of sulphamic acid has one mole of replaceable hydrogen ions. [1]
 
 
 
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