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    Would it be at all possible for me to undertake a, lets say, Civil Engineering Undergraduate degree and then transfer to doing an Architecture Postgraduate degree? Could this be RIBA accredited and make me a chartered Architect? Many thanks for an help or advice

    P.S: I do apologise for the typo in the title, my bad :/
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    Why on earth would you even want to do that? If you hadn't done architecture at undergraduate, you would suck at postgraduate, although I doubt you would get onto a course.
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    (Original post by Farchitect)
    Why on earth would you even want to do that? If you hadn't done architecture at undergraduate, you would suck at postgraduate, although I doubt you would get onto a course.
    I was wondering what alternative options there would be for me to undertake once I had an undergraduate degree in engineering. Maybe I find them both interesting, and wanted to know when would be the latest point when I would have to make my mind up on which one I would like to pursue further..
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    (Original post by fg(x))
    Would it be at all possible for me to undertake a, lets say, Civil Engineering Undergraduate degree and then transfer to doing an Architecture Postgraduate degree? Could this be RIBA accredited and make me a chartered Architect? Many thanks for an help or advice

    P.S: I do apologise for the typo in the title, my bad :/
    If you want to be an Architect you'd have to do both undergrad and postgrad followed by part 3 quals that are RIBA accredited. I've thought about engineering and what I would do if it was me would be to qualify as an Architect and then supplement my training with an engineering course of some sort - not thought into it enough to tell you what.

    If you want to do both you could always study at Sheffield on their course 'MEng in Structural Engineering and Architecture'. Its a 4 years undergrad but the only course to be RIBA accredited Part 1 and Engineering (IStructE and ICE). (mechanical engineering)
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    (Original post by fg(x))
    P.S: I do apologise for the typo in the title, my bad :/
    Fixed
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    (Original post by Charlaimee)
    If you want to be an Architect you'd have to do both undergrad and postgrad followed by part 3 quals that are RIBA accredited. I've thought about engineering and what I would do if it was me would be to qualify as an Architect and then supplement my training with an engineering course of some sort - not thought into it enough to tell you what.

    If you want to do both you could always study at Sheffield on their course 'MEng in Structural Engineering and Architecture'. Its a 4 years undergrad but the only course to be RIBA accredited Part 1 and Engineering (IStructE and ICE). (mechanical engineering)
    Thank you ever so much for your reply. I am glad to see that there are realistic alternatives to my dilemma.

    Also, would Maths, Further Maths, Physics and Chemistry be viable A-level choices to study Architecture or Engineering at Cambridge?
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    (Original post by jneill)
    Fixed
    Haha! Thank you, these things bug me ever so much
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    (Original post by fg(x))
    Thank you ever so much for your reply. I am glad to see that there are realistic alternatives to my dilemma.

    Also, would Maths, Further Maths, Physics and Chemistry be viable A-level choices to study Architecture or Engineering at Cambridge?
    Yes. Although Architecture will require a portfolio too. And some colleges require an art/science mix.
    http://www.undergraduate.study.cam.a...s/architecture


    And Chem is not required (for either) but can be helpful for Engineering IF you are confident the workload won't distract you.

    They want quality not quantity. Much better to get A*A*A than AAAB.

    (Original post by fg(x))
    Haha! Thank you, these things bug me ever so much
    Me three

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    In all honesty, there is so much to learn just to be a good architect, "supplementing" that with engineering is pointless and a waste of valuable brain space, because unless you somehow gain enough knowledge and experience (i.e. at least master's level and 10 - 15 years experience) you are not going to be in a position to sign off any of the engineering side of things anyway so you would still need a consultant.

    My advice is choose what you really want to do now, and focus on that, sometimes in life your best just to make a decision and go with it, you can't spend your whole life trying to keep doors open.
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    (Original post by Farchitect)
    In all honesty, there is so much to learn just to be a good architect, "supplementing" that with engineering is pointless and a waste of valuable brain space, because unless you somehow gain enough knowledge and experience (i.e. at least master's level and 10 - 15 years experience) you are not going to be in a position to sign off any of the engineering side of things anyway so you would still need a consultant.

    My advice is choose what you really want to do now, and focus on that, sometimes in life your best just to make a decision and go with it, you can't spend your whole life trying to keep doors open.

    In all honesty back handedly ****ging off my opinion is not what the OP asked for. If you read my post I've talked about "supplementing" my own education not suggesting the OP must do so. You have no idea what I plan on doing with my career i.e. If I plan on continuing on being an Architect or on doing something within the field that may require a little more knowledge on the engineering front. Not to mention I find it interesting so studying it would be enjoyable.

    So don't worry yourself about the amount of "brain space" I'm wasting I'm confident I have the room.


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    (Original post by Charlaimee)
    In all honesty back handedly ****ging off my opinion is not what the OP asked for. If you read my post I've talked about "supplementing" my own education not suggesting the OP must do so. You have no idea what I plan on doing with my career i.e. If I plan on continuing on being an Architect or on doing something within the field that may require a little more knowledge on the engineering front. Not to mention I find it interesting so studying it would be enjoyable.

    So don't worry yourself about the amount of "brain space" I'm wasting I'm confident I have the room.


    Then you clearly don't know what you're talking about, and it sounds like you might / OP could be about to make a silly choice. Of course its your money and life so feel free to disregard someone with more experience than you.

    The bottom line is, if you want to do engineering then you're better of just doing that, and the same with architecture. Nobody in engineering is going to respect you more because you're an architect. Plus if you like engineering, then I can't but feel that you would find architecture in practice to be pretty dull.

    In architecture just because you've done your 7 (usually more like 10) years to "qualify", the learning doesn't stop, and you still won't know 1% of what you need to know and will be relying heavily on colleagues even then.
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    (Original post by Farchitect)
    Then you clearly don't know what you're talking about, and it sounds like you might / OP could be about to make a silly choice. Of course its your money and life so feel free to disregard someone with more experience than you.

    The bottom line is, if you want to do engineering then you're better of just doing that, and the same with architecture. Nobody in engineering is going to respect you more because you're an architect. Plus if you like engineering, then I can't but feel that you would find architecture in practice to be pretty dull.

    In architecture just because you've done your 7 (usually more like 10) years to "qualify", the learning doesn't stop, and you still won't know 1% of what you need to know and will be relying heavily on colleagues even then.

    You assume you have more experience than me you mean, as you have no idea who I am.

    If I was going to study some sort of engineering it would not be to be respected by engineers or architects alike, it would be to better understand the mechanics of architecture. Architecture after all is not just a building, studying speculative design alongside a knowledge of engineering would be beneficial to me as I don't want to spend my life designing car parks - maybe you do. Don't worry about how I find practice, seeing as I work in practice now.

    Yes, the learning doesn't stop. Exactly my point - why should you limit yourself to just architecture alone.

    You seem very closed minded and very quick to disregard anyone else's opinion but your own.
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    (Original post by Charlaimee)
    You assume you have more experience than me you mean, as you have no idea who I am.

    If I was going to study some sort of engineering it would not be to be respected by engineers or architects alike, it would be to better understand the mechanics of architecture. Architecture after all is not just a building, studying speculative design alongside a knowledge of engineering would be beneficial to me as I don't want to spend my life designing car parks - maybe you do. Don't worry about how I find practice, seeing as I work in practice now.

    Yes, the learning doesn't stop. Exactly my point - why should you limit yourself to just architecture alone.

    You seem very closed minded and very quick to disregard anyone else's opinion but your own.
    You just seemed a bit immature when you interpreted my initial response as a back handed reply, when I hadn't even read your response at that point. Anyway I have no interest in having a personal argument with a 6th former on work experience, and I'll ignore the comment about car parks.

    If you are using engineering as a means to get the opportunity to work on more interesting buildings, I don't think that is the most efficient way to go about it, architects in the early part of their careers are always education rich and experience poor. If you're just a rich student with money to burn on degrees then fine, but nobody can give you advice on that basis.
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    (Original post by Farchitect)
    You just seemed a bit immature when you interpreted my initial response as a back handed reply, when I hadn't even read your response at that point. Anyway I have no interest in having a personal argument with a 6th former on work experience, and I'll ignore the comment about car parks.

    If you are using engineering as a means to get the opportunity to work on more interesting buildings, I don't think that is the most efficient way to go about it, architects in the early part of their careers are always education rich and experience poor. If you're just a rich student with money to burn on degrees then fine, but nobody can give you advice on that basis.
    Dear oh dear, you repeated my response almost word for word so there isn't much point in backtracking and saying you hadn't read it now.

    I'm no 6th former sweet, I'm postgrad just like you.

    I think you are quite missing my point about engineering, no it is not to work on more interesting buildings.

    You should really check the info I'd given OP about the course at Sheffield, the degree is accredited as fully satisfying the educational base for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) and accredited by the RIBA as part 1 sufficient. Yet I guess you know more and they are wrong - architecture and engineering are a waste of time.

    Should your reply contain more uneducated assumptions about myself I would refrain from quoting me in any further posts.

    Good luck to the OP I hope he enjoys whatever undergraduate degree and career he decides to embark on.
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    (Original post by Charlaimee)
    Dear oh dear, you repeated my response almost word for word so there isn't much point in backtracking and saying you hadn't read it now.

    I'm no 6th former sweet, I'm postgrad just like you.

    I think you are quite missing my point about engineering, no it is not to work on more interesting buildings.

    You should really check the info I'd given OP about the course at Sheffield, the degree is accredited as fully satisfying the educational base for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) and accredited by the RIBA as part 1 sufficient. Yet I guess you know more and they are wrong - architecture and engineering are a waste of time.

    Should your reply contain more uneducated assumptions about myself I would refrain from quoting me in any further posts.

    Good luck to the OP I hope he enjoys whatever undergraduate degree and career he decides to embark on.
    Well I think you're flattering yourself, I have no interest in offering you back-handers...

    I'm not saying architecture and engineering can't be combined, I'm saying it's a waste of time to do both the full course of architecture (i.e up to Part III) and a full degree in engineering. The combined course is possibly a better option. But I still think if you actually want to do engineering your better to focus on that and do well in that, and likewise the same in architecture.
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    (Original post by fg(x))
    Would it be at all possible for me to undertake a, lets say, Civil Engineering Undergraduate degree and then transfer to doing an Architecture Postgraduate degree? Could this be RIBA accredited and make me a chartered Architect? Many thanks for an help or advice

    P.S: I do apologise for the typo in the title, my bad :/
    The short answer is "no", but there are a handful of really amazing designers who transcend their title, e.g.Santiago Calatrava, Frei Otto, Ove Arup, to name just 3. A good architect will understand structures (though not necessarily be able to do the calculations!) and a good structural engineer will understand architecture (which, in my admittedly biased perspective,is the harder way around). When an engineer talks about design, they mean narrowing down and arriving at a singular solution to a "simple" problem. Architecture deals with "wicked" problems - i.e. finding the best fit solution to a range of demands some of which may be contradictory. This is not verifiable, in the way that a structural calculation is verifiable. There is an old joke that makes the point, "ask 2 architects for their opinion and you will receive 3 answers." As someone else said in this thread, architecture is not [just] designing buildings.
    Architecture courses in the UK tend to be more artistic (and increasingly research orientated). There are a smaller number with a reputation for being more engineering orientated. The simple way to tell where they came from is if they are Bachelor of Arts (BA) or a Bachelor of Science (BSc), but the only way to really tell is to visit and ask the staff and students.either way, you will need a portfolio. The portfolio should demonstrate how you think visually. It should be about the process - skills can be taught - but creativity is much harder to learn (or relearn, as we all start creative and then school knocks it out of you!)
    Good luck whatever you do, but my best advice would be that if you're not sure, you're not ready for either. Take a year out to get work experience and visit universities' Open Days and then decide when you have some first hand information rather than listening to people on The Student Room!
 
 
 
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