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    I need some help with a moles question, I just can't seem to understand moles. If you could please explain these questions for me and how I can get the answers.

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    Reda
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    To calculate number of moles simply divide mass given to you by the mass number. So in the question number of moles is equal to 12/12. Hence number of moles is equal to 1. Use Avogadro's constant to calculate number of atoms or particles (same thing really). Avogadro stated that the number of atoms in a substance is the same once you know the number of moles. 1 mole of any substance has 6.02×10 to the power of 23.

    So in the question given to you 1 mole of carbon (which you calculated ) must have Avogadro's number.

    The thing about moles is that everyone gets hung about the definition of the mole. It is irrelevant. It is simply a unit. Chemists and Physicists need to use it as they work with infentismally small amounts.

    All I can say is that the more you practice mole calculations the easier they become.
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    (Original post by Reda2)
    I need some help with a moles question, I just can't seem to understand moles. If you could please explain these questions for me and how I can get the answers.

    Name:  Capture.PNG
Views: 75
Size:  3.9 KB



    Thanks
    Reda
    This question doesn't seem legit, where did you get it from?

    the mass of 1 mole of carbon is ~12 grams, you're probably just going to confuse yourself by practicing nonsense questions.

    ---
    1 mole of anything is 6,02 x 1023 of those things... it's a very large number so it's usually used for very small things like atoms or molecules.
    6.02 x 1023 is called Avagadro's number

    1 mole of carbon atoms is 6,02 x 1023 carbon atoms so if you know the mass of a sample of carbon you can work out the number of moles of atoms it contains quite simply, ti's 12 g per mole... but it's not acceptable to make up values for the mass of a mole of carbon as the author of this question has done.
 
 
 
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