Parents' Evening Watch

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Trevor Brohier
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#1
Report 16 years ago
#1
Can I test the water? What do people feel is a reasonable time for parents' evenings to end? At our
daughters' (comprehensive) school they like to finish around about the time I would expect a large
number of working people to start to be available - slight exaggeration, but you catch my drift!

Trevor
Beanz
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#2
Report 16 years ago
#2
[q1]> Can I test the water? What do people feel is a reasonable time for[/q1]
parents'
[q1]> evenings to end? At our daughters' (comprehensive) school they like to finish around about the[/q1]
[q1]> time I would expect a large number of working[/q1]
people
[q1]> to start to be available - slight exaggeration, but you catch my drift![/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Trevor[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
I know you didn't mean it Trevor but you could be misread as suggesting that teachers are not
"working people". A reasonable time for teachers to finish working would be a reasonable time that
anyone else would finish working. I know all the arguments about long holidays etc. but, even if
these arguments could be substantiated and teachers were asked to work extra hours to accommodate
parent consultations, it would be fair to ask why these should be at the end of a full day's work -
why not have afternoon's set aside specifically for the purpose? This, of course, would not solve
the problem that "working people" have in not being able to attend.
--
????????? The Beanz <><><><><
Eric Stroud
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#3
Report 16 years ago
#3
"Trevor Brohier" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:1016458805.9163.0.nnrp-12.c1ed9...ws.demon.co.uk...
[q1]> Can I test the water? What do people feel is a reasonable time for[/q1]
parents'
[q1]> evenings to end? At our daughters' (comprehensive) school they like to finish around about the[/q1]
[q1]> time I would expect a large number of working[/q1]
people
[q1]> to start to be available - slight exaggeration, but you catch my drift![/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Trevor[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]

how about the same time that solicitors, dentists, banks et al stay open to for teachers
Trevor Brohier
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#4
Report 16 years ago
#4
You mean Saturday mornings and evening surgeries? A couple of times a term would certainly help
parental involvement.

Trevor.

eric stroud <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> "Trevor Brohier" <[email protected]> wrote in message[/q1]
[q1]> news:1016458805.9163.0.nnrp-12.c1ed9...ws.demon.co.uk...[/q1]
[q2]> > Can I test the water? What do people feel is a reasonable time for[/q2]
[q1]> parents'[/q1]
[q2]> > evenings to end? At our daughters' (comprehensive) school they like to finish around about the[/q2]
[q2]> > time I would expect a large number of working[/q2]
[q1]> people[/q1]
[q2]> > to start to be available - slight exaggeration, but you catch my drift![/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > Trevor[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> how about the same time that solicitors, dentists, banks et al stay open[/q1]
to
[q1]> for teachers[/q1]
Trevor Brohier
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#5
Report 16 years ago
#5
I'd better be explicit! I'm not seeking to drive a wedge between 'working' and 'non-working' people,
'waged' and 'non-waged', teachers and parents etc. I'm just exploring the situation I find myself in
and am interested to know what other people's opinions are.

Generally speaking, I would have thought teachers fell into the same category of 'working person'
that I am talking about i.e. struggle to be home by 6.00pm. Although, I expect they have more leeway
than many when it comes to leaving the premises before 5.00.

However, most skilled, and many 'non-skilled', people finish work when the work is finished. And
little regard is given to the 'reasonableness' of the hour. I'm not saying this is a good thing, but
should it not have some influence on the organization of events that are intended to be open to as
many people as possible?

Which brings me onto another question: are parents' evenings valued by teachers/schools/the
education system? And what are they expected to achieve? The general impression I have is that we
(the parents) are being discouraged from, if not attending, at least from seeing more than a handful
of teachers, which makes me feel that it is something of a token gesture.

For instance, the time allocated to one teacher recently was not enough for him to see all the
parents even at twice the normal (for this school) frequency. Most parents wished to attend and, not
surprisingly, some were not allotted an appointment.

So, do teachers/schools feel that parents' evenings are time well spent? And is there a conflict
between the needs of the teachers, the pupils, the parents and the system?

And, back on a more personal level, what do parents do in order to attend between 4.00pm and 7.00pm
and see all the teachers (our school arranges 5 minute slots with 5 mins between each i.e. 10
teachers 1 hr 40mins)? Do people take holiday? Or unpaid leave? Or can most people simply slip out
early? What about those who are not able to get time off? Do they arrange other meeting times?

Just want to know what everyone does to be able to attend. Of course, the sub-text is, isn't there a
better way of doing this?

beanz <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
[q2]> > Can I test the water? What do people feel is a reasonable time for[/q2]
[q1]> parents'[/q1]
[q2]> > evenings to end? At our daughters' (comprehensive) school they like to finish around about the[/q2]
[q2]> > time I would expect a large number of working[/q2]
[q1]> people[/q1]
[q2]> > to start to be available - slight exaggeration, but you catch my drift![/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> > Trevor[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q1]> I know you didn't mean it Trevor but you could be misread as suggesting[/q1]
that
[q1]> teachers are not "working people". A reasonable time for teachers to finish working would be a[/q1]
[q1]> reasonable[/q1]
time
[q1]> that anyone else would finish working. I know all the arguments about[/q1]
long
[q1]> holidays etc. but, even if these arguments could be substantiated and teachers were asked to work[/q1]
[q1]> extra hours to accommodate parent[/q1]
consultations,
[q1]> it would be fair to ask why these should be at the end of a full day's work - why not have[/q1]
[q1]> afternoon's set aside specifically for the purpose? This, of course, would not solve the problem[/q1]
[q1]> that "working people" have in not being able to attend.[/q1]
[q1]> --[/q1]
[q1]> ????????? The Beanz <><><><><[/q1]
Unregistered
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#6
Report 15 years ago
#6
I am a teacher and I find it completely unreasonable for you to suggest that teachers are not interested in speaking to parents about thier children's progress. I think you will find that most teachers are aware of the critical position parents and carers play in the development of their offspring. Teachers, in the most part, are motivated by getting the best for your children, as i assume are parents - we are all batting for the same side.

Yes we do have slightly more leeway with the time we can leave in the evenings, providing we take crates of marking/planning/assessment home and can face getting it out again after we have been to evening surgery (providing we could get an appointment more than three months in advance).

I fully understand that it can be difficult to get to meetings but they are important. If you are having trouble fitting them all in you could always concentrate on the core subjects, english maths and science.

At our school we positivley encourage an open dialogue with the parents so any issues are not saved up till parents evening but dealt with quickly and effectively and I make a point of being available to "working" people who wish to discuss their child's progress even if it means staying on later.

Teaching is a hard, thankless enough task as it is without people implying that we have it easy...we don't. A job you can put down at 6 and not think about till 9 the next morning - now thats an easy job!
Unregistered
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#7
Report 15 years ago
#7
Originally posted by Unregistered
I am a teacher and I find it completely unreasonable for you to suggest that teachers are not interested in speaking to parents about thier children's progress. I think you will find that most teachers are aware of the critical position parents and carers play in the development of their offspring. Teachers, in the most part, are motivated by getting the best for your children, as i assume are parents - we are all batting for the same side.

Yes we do have slightly more leeway with the time we can leave in the evenings, providing we take crates of marking/planning/assessment home and can face getting it out again after we have been to evening surgery (providing we could get an appointment more than three months in advance).

I fully understand that it can be difficult to get to meetings but they are important. If you are having trouble fitting them all in you could always concentrate on the core subjects, english maths and science.

At our school we positivley encourage an open dialogue with the parents so any issues are not saved up till parents evening but dealt with quickly and effectively and I make a point of being available to "working" people who wish to discuss their child's progress even if it means staying on later.

Teaching is a hard, thankless enough task as it is without people implying that we have it easy...we don't. A job you can put down at 6 and not think about till 9 the next morning - now thats an easy job!
How about a job that you can put down for a month or two, three times a year. How about a job that's relatively insulated from market forces, and one that provides immense personal satisfaction and a strong social support mechanism? Of course it varies from school to school, but teaching does have certain attractions.
Unregistered
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#8
Report 15 years ago
#8
Are you a teacher? Obviously not as I can tell from your naive ideas about what being a teaching constitutes. Put down for a month or two... I? I don't argue that the holiday situation is a lot more favourable in my job than it is in many others but I think month or two is stretching the truth JUST SLIGHTLY. Are you then implying that teachers do not work during these perpetual holidays...you're having a laugh!
Linny
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#9
Report 15 years ago
#9
Yeah you are dead right...small minded people who's basic (and somewhat tired) idea that teaching is a cushy job is completely unfounded. Anyone who is one knows that, anyone who isn't hasn't got a leg to stand on arguing about it!
0
Unregistered
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#10
Report 15 years ago
#10
Hello

I have to say that my parents always hadto finish work early to get to parensts evenings, which is a bit of a pain. I understand that teachers may not want to stay late but its part of their job to tell parents how their children are doing. Maybe they could just stick to reports rather than parents evenings and make teachers more accessible for parents to ask questions about thier child'd preogress.
Linny
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#11
Report 15 years ago
#11
You say, and I am not disputing it, that it is a bit of a pain for parents to get off work early. In the same breath it's a bit of a pain for teachers to stay late, given that the day to day workload of planning, teaching and assessing is not reduced to accomodate parents evening. I think if parents and teachers are committed to the development of the children in their care that it is more than worth a little inconvenience on both parts. I certainly don't mind staying late and discussing children's progress with parents as I see it as an essential part of the learning process but I have to admit i does get my back up when it is implied that teachers careers and lifestyle is overshadowed by the impotance placed on the careers of parents. I work extremely hard, as do other members of my profession, I think we deserve a little credit for the job we do.
0
Unregistered
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#12
Report 15 years ago
#12
Hang on a minute! I never said that teachers didnt do a decent job and weren't interested or what ever you though I was trying to say. I want to be a teacher when I graduate and I see parent's evening as part of the job. Trevor has been insulted just for "testing the water". He didnt say anything about teachers not being a "proper" job or some of the things people threw at him. I was just try to show that yes often some people do have to leave work early which was actually what he asked. He just wondered whether other schools and parents had this problem not to dispute the teaching profession. If you dont like parents evenings and the way they work or having to stay, then suggest some other ways of getting parents involved. Like I said before, if it is that much of a hassle for both teachers, parents and children, then why dont we stick to reports or have some other form of communication.
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