Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

"I liked their last book" - Loyalty to authors, does it work? watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    I picked up a book on Friday by Jonas Jonasson. If you recognise his name it's probably from his debut The Hundred Year Old Man Who Climbed Out of the Window and Disappeared, or his second book The Girl Who Saved the King of Sweden. Both excellent, by the way.

    So, when I came across Hitman Anders and the Meaning of It All for a very low price on Kindle I jumped at it. And I read it in a little over a day because that's the best way to consume a book written like The Hundred Year Old Man....

    And I was disappointed. It was quite good, I gave it 3 stars, but the writing style and twists and turns and historical information mixed with ridiculous situations that are actually only just plausible didn't quite live up this time. All of the elements were still there, but it just didn't seem to come together as well. But this isn't about my review of this book.

    I have a lot of author loyalty, but this time it backfired and left me disappointed. I selected this book specifically because I liked the author's earlier books. My dad does it with James Patterson, my mum with Jodi Picoult, and young adults everywhere with John Green (guilty of this myself). But is this a good strategy?
    Or did I just open myself up for yesterday's disappointment?
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    I think it's a good strategy. If you like their themes and writing style in one book, odds are you'll like it in the next book too. This is why triologies and book series are so enthralling because similar settings and styles, alongside character development is very appealing to most of us.


    That said, you may get caught out from time to time.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Supersaps)
    I think it's a good strategy. If you like their themes and writing style in one book, odds are you'll like it in the next book too. This is why triologies and book series are so enthralling because similar settings and styles, alongside character development is very appealing to most of us.


    That said, you may get caught out from time to time.
    Book series are a completely different ball game, because you're looking at the same characters and usually a continuation of the same story. I recently finished the Mara Dyer series and the last one there was a little disappointing towards the end (review coming soon in the reading challenge thread and my blog), but I had to know what happened to those characters and how the story resolved.

    But when you look at the three by Jonas Jonasson, or John Green's books for example, they're all completely different stories. I do like the themes and writing styles, but you are kind of starting from scratch with a new story with that trust.

    I think I'm probably still going to do it, I have at least two standalone Sophie Hannah books, that I got from Wordery after reading her Spilling CID series, waiting for me, but I don't know if I'm more disappointed in the Jonas Jonasson book because I was expecting bigger things...
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    I've never read what I would consider a "bad" Trudi Canavan book.

    That being said, it must differ from author to author, especially if they try to branch out into a different genre they have little experience with.
    • TSR Community Team
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Community Team
    Study Helper
    (Original post by minimarshmallow)
    I picked up a book on Friday by Jonas Jonasson. If you recognise his name it's probably from his debut The Hundred Year Old Man Who Climbed Out of the Window and Disappeared, or his second book The Girl Who Saved the King of Sweden. Both excellent, by the way.

    So, when I came across Hitman Anders and the Meaning of It All for a very low price on Kindle I jumped at it. And I read it in a little over a day because that's the best way to consume a book written like The Hundred Year Old Man....

    And I was disappointed. It was quite good, I gave it 3 stars, but the writing style and twists and turns and historical information mixed with ridiculous situations that are actually only just plausible didn't quite live up this time. All of the elements were still there, but it just didn't seem to come together as well. But this isn't about my review of this book.

    I have a lot of author loyalty, but this time it backfired and left me disappointed. I selected this book specifically because I liked the author's earlier books. My dad does it with James Patterson, my mum with Jodi Picoult, and young adults everywhere with John Green (guilty of this myself). But is this a good strategy?
    Or did I just open myself up for yesterday's disappointment?
    I'm a big advocate of striking out and pushing your boundaries to find new authors. Also, if you stick with the same one, even if they're really good, you can pick up on their style and it starts to break the magic.

    Usually when I discover an author I love, I will inevitably read another one by them. Then I'll try to save the rest of their back catalogue for later, as you know it's generally a guaranteed hit. Especially if you did read that second book to confirm whether they're a one book wonder or not.

    I think I've rarely read a book by an author where I liked one of their books and not another.
    • TSR Group Staff
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Group Staff
    I have mixed feelings on this. My favourite author is Philip K **** and although most of his books are excellent, the magic does wear off as the mechanics of his writing style become clear. But then again, if you really love an author it'd be silly to not try more of their books.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Captain Jack)
    I think I've rarely read a book by an author where I liked one of their books and not another.
    I guess that's it, majority of the time it'll work like this.

    This brings me to the flip side of this question as well, would you avoid based on the author? I could not stand Gone Girl, and as a result have never read any of the author's other books despite their good reviews. Is one bad book by an author evidence on its own?
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    I mainly buy books I've been recommended by others. I don't have an awful lot of author loyalty YET. I'm sure it's probably a good idea as if you like a few books by the author surely you like their style of writing so any of their books will be good to you? Don't let it stop you reading other books by them, maybe that just wasn't their best work.

    Also I don't like John Green's books... such disappointing endings! I haven't read them all though.
    • TSR Group Staff
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Group Staff
    (Original post by Professor Oak)
    I have mixed feelings on this. My favourite author is Philip K **** and although most of his books are excellent, the magic does wear off as the mechanics of his writing style become clear. But then again, if you really love an author it'd be silly to not try more of their books.
    I'll read anything by B. Smith. That dude writes some awesome sci-fi.
    • TSR Community Team
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Community Team
    Study Helper
    (Original post by minimarshmallow)
    I guess that's it, majority of the time it'll work like this.

    This brings me to the flip side of this question as well, would you avoid based on the author? I could not stand Gone Girl, and as a result have never read any of the author's other books despite their good reviews. Is one bad book by an author evidence on its own?
    Yes! Labyrinth by Kate Mosse was IMO the worst book I've ever read. And I've suffered through Les Miserables and Moby ****.

    I doubt I'll read anything by her again. I'm sure she's lovely and many people enjoyed it, but it felt like a rushed copy of books by JRR Tolkein with no originality.
    • TSR Community Team
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Community Team
    I love Haruki Murakami and The wind up bid chronicle is one of the best books I've ever read. So I struggled through the whole of 1Q84 waiting for it to get good but it never did. Bad times.

    I guess you can never know, although if you liked an author's previous works chances are you're going to enjoy their other books
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kalclash)
    I'll read anything by B. Smith. That dude writes some awesome sci-fi.
    Who? Google only comes up with some model-come-restaurateur.
    • TSR Community Team
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Community Team
    I loved Kate Atkinson's fiction but thought her detective novels were rubbish - I think it's when you read multiple genres by the same author that you'll always prefer one over the other.

    Although this does not apply to J.K. Rowling whose detective novels are some of the best I've ever read.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Captain Jack)
    I think I've rarely read a book by an author where I liked one of their books and not another.
    I've come across this sometimes.

    One example is Mistress of the Art of Death by Ariana Franklin. I really liked this book, but the sequel, The Death Maze, was rubbish by comparison. I've not been inspired to read any more of them.

    And an author I've found to be totally hit and miss is Terry Brooks. Some of the Shannara books are great (once you get over the blatant rip-off the The Lord of the Rings). But others are absolute tripe. It seems random which you'll get!
    • TSR Group Staff
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Group Staff
    (Original post by chazwomaq)
    Who? Google only comes up with some model-come-restaurateur.
    Sorry that was an in-joke. My actual auther that I love is called Brian Lumley - he wrote a series called Necroscope. A very dark vampire horror series.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by minimarshmallow)
    I picked up a book on Friday by Jonas Jonasson. If you recognise his name it's probably from his debut The Hundred Year Old Man Who Climbed Out of the Window and Disappeared, or his second book The Girl Who Saved the King of Sweden. Both excellent, by the way.

    So, when I came across Hitman Anders and the Meaning of It All for a very low price on Kindle I jumped at it. And I read it in a little over a day because that's the best way to consume a book written like The Hundred Year Old Man....

    And I was disappointed. It was quite good, I gave it 3 stars, but the writing style and twists and turns and historical information mixed with ridiculous situations that are actually only just plausible didn't quite live up this time. All of the elements were still there, but it just didn't seem to come together as well. But this isn't about my review of this book.

    I have a lot of author loyalty, but this time it backfired and left me disappointed. I selected this book specifically because I liked the author's earlier books. My dad does it with James Patterson, my mum with Jodi Picoult, and young adults everywhere with John Green (guilty of this myself). But is this a good strategy?
    Or did I just open myself up for yesterday's disappointment?
    It does happen sometimes. I love John Green's books in general but when I finally got around to reading Will Grayson, Will Grayson I didn't find it as good. However whenever Ernest Cine (https://wordery.com/search?term=ernest+cline) or Rainbow Rowell (https://wordery.com/search?term=Rainbow+Rowell) have released a new book I've fallen in love with every single one. Sometimes when authors write about different issues their style changes as a result and that can lead to disappointment, but to be honest it depends. It's a logical assumption, but not a guaranteed good result :-)
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by minimarshmallow)
    I picked up a book on Friday by Jonas Jonasson. If you recognise his name it's probably from his debut The Hundred Year Old Man Who Climbed Out of the Window and Disappeared, or his second book The Girl Who Saved the King of Sweden. Both excellent, by the way.

    So, when I came across Hitman Anders and the Meaning of It All for a very low price on Kindle I jumped at it. And I read it in a little over a day because that's the best way to consume a book written like The Hundred Year Old Man....

    And I was disappointed. It was quite good, I gave it 3 stars, but the writing style and twists and turns and historical information mixed with ridiculous situations that are actually only just plausible didn't quite live up this time. All of the elements were still there, but it just didn't seem to come together as well. But this isn't about my review of this book.

    I have a lot of author loyalty, but this time it backfired and left me disappointed. I selected this book specifically because I liked the author's earlier books. My dad does it with James Patterson, my mum with Jodi Picoult, and young adults everywhere with John Green (guilty of this myself). But is this a good strategy?
    Or did I just open myself up for yesterday's disappointment?
    Author loyalty is a good idea. I do it myself. Especially with certain authors such as Mike Pannett.
    There is the occasional disapointment though, But thats a risk you have to take i suppose.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: May 17, 2016
Poll
Do you agree with the PM's proposal to cut tuition fees for some courses?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.