Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    So if you have say iron(II) sulphate which can obviously be written in a convenient way  \text{FeSO}_4 . I'm aware that this can be in a hydrated form (most commonly)  \text{FeSO}_4 \cdot 7 \text{H}_2 \text{O} .
    I have a few questions. Firstly what is the hydrated ion above called (how do you systematically name it) and what is its structure like?
    Is it like  \left [ \text{Fe(H}_2 \text{O} )_6 \right ]^{2+} with the other water outside of the main complex (sulphate obviously ionically bonded) or is it something else (maybe something to do with the different coordination spheres)?
    Thank you
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Anyone have any knowledge of this and can help me understand it a bit more?
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ano123)
    Anyone have any knowledge of this and can help me understand it a bit more?
    Gimme 5.. I'm looking through notes from the first year of my degree because I'm sure I didn't do that at A-level!
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ano123)
    So if you have say iron(II) sulphate which can obviously be written in a convenient way  \text{FeSO}_4 . I'm aware that this can be in a hydrated form (most commonly)  \text{FeSO}_4 \cdot 7 \text{H}_2 \text{O} .
    I have a few questions. Firstly what is the hydrated ion above called (how do you systematically name it) and what is its structure like?
    Is it like  \left [ \text{Fe(H}_2 \text{O} )_6 \right ]^{2+} with the other water outside of the main complex (sulphate obviously ionically bonded) or is it something else (maybe something to do with the different coordination spheres)?
    Thank you
    I think it might be ferrous sulphatoheptahydrate
    • Community Assistant
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    Study Helper
    (Original post by Ano123)
    So if you have say iron(II) sulphate which can obviously be written in a convenient way  \text{FeSO}_4 . I'm aware that this can be in a hydrated form (most commonly)  \text{FeSO}_4 \cdot 7 \text{H}_2 \text{O} .
    I have a few questions. Firstly what is the hydrated ion above called (how do you systematically name it) and what is its structure like?
    Is it like  \left [ \text{Fe(H}_2 \text{O} )_6 \right ]^{2+} with the other water outside of the main complex (sulphate obviously ionically bonded) or is it something else (maybe something to do with the different coordination spheres)?
    Thank you
    iron(II) sulfate heptahydrate

    The iron will have an octahedral coordination sphere and the remaining water will form part of the crystal lattice along with the sulfate ion.

    If you want the unit cell structure you probably need a book like Earnshaw and Greenwood's - Chemistry of the elements.

    EDIT: No the above book does not have the crystal unit cell, only confirmation of the hexaaquairon(II) ion in the structure.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What's your favourite Christmas sweets?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.