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    About 50k? Maybe doing a masters or phd
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    (Original post by champ_mc99)
    About 50k? Maybe doing a masters or phd
    When you say '£50k', is that starting or peak career? If starting, none directly applicable to NatSci. Though there are jobs open to degree subjects of all kinds - usually restricted to top uni grads - that come close or exceed that starting.

    If peak career, I'm sure you could get there if you rose up to a management position at a research centre or the R&D department of a large company. Maybe even after several years as a lecturer at a good university.


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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    When you say '£50k', is that starting or peak career? If starting, none directly applicable to NatSci. Though there are jobs open to degree subjects of all kinds - usually restricted to top uni grads - that come close or exceed that starting.

    If peak career, I'm sure you could get there if you rose up to a management position at a research centre or the R&D department of a large company. Maybe even after several years as a lecturer at a good university.


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    Peak/median. Thanks.
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    If you want starting, look at quant hedge funds (i.e. Winton Capital Management or Rebellion) they pay their researchers pretty well though you'd want to go down the maths/physics route for that ideally and getting into them is hard, especially without a Phd.

    Peak.median, there are lots. Most engineering/research careers will see that sort of salary (a post-doc fresh out of their Phd is paid £30K at the uni I'm doing my Masters at)
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    (Original post by natninja)
    If you want starting, look at quant hedge funds (i.e. Winton Capital Management or Rebellion) they pay their researchers pretty well though you'd want to go down the maths/physics route for that ideally and getting into them is hard, especially without a Phd.
    Would add stuff like equity research and I-banking specialising in healthcare/pharmaceuticals/industrials etc.. As well as the quant prop trading shops.


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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Would add stuff like equity research and I-banking specialising in healthcare/pharmaceuticals/industrials etc.. As well as the quant prop trading shops.


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    disagree regarding healthcare/pharma they tend to want people with a medical background (many require a Phd in a medical or biochem field) - though NatSci can be very useful for tech teams and tech specialist IBanks (such as Capital SCF) and Venture Cap funds who often specialise in tech though getting your foot in the door is hard. NatSci can count against you in preliminary rounds for ER as there is the preconception of poor people skills so doing extra-curriculars is a must for those (and not just participating but holding positions of responsibility). Quant prop shops aren't fussy about what degree you have as long as your mental maths skills are phenomenally good (a lot have an arithmetic test of 80 questions in 10 mins with a deduction of 2 for each incorrect answer and require a score of 50+ and even answering 50 questions in the time limit is quite tough)

    Forgot to mention that operational consultancies could be good. See Newton Europe (they don't even care about your final degree score as long as you make their interview/assessment benchmarks which is tough - they send ~50% of people home at lunchtime on the assessment days and most don;t even make it that far. Their basic package to start with is £3K sign on bonus, £40K salary plus company car and profit share).
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    (Original post by natninja)
    disagree regarding healthcare/pharma they tend to want people with a medical background (many require a Phd in a medical or biochem field) - though NatSci can be very useful for tech teams and tech specialist IBands (such as Capital SCF) and Venture Cap funds who often specialise in tech though getting your foot in the door is hard. NatSci can count against you in preliminary rounds for ER as there is the preconception of poor people skills so doing extra-curriculars is a must for those (and not just participating but holding positions of responsibility). Quant prop shops aren't fussy about what degree you have as long as your mental maths skills are phenomenally good (a lot have an arithmetic test of 80 questions in 10 mins with a deduction of 2 for each incorrect answer and require a score of 50+ and even answering 50 questions in the time limit is quite tough)
    Would agree with the latter of your post, but not the first point. NatSci with a focus on Bio-Chem NatSci would be absolutely fine for specialising in Healthcare/Pharma IB/ER.

    Wrt tech teams, I don't see how NatSci would greatly help. Maybe in clean tech or some form of renewables specialisation, but, apart from that most coverage teams would take on any grads. I'm not so sure there would be any immediate 'preconceptions' held against a NatSci student - their performance at interview is largely down to how well they come across. ECs/leadership stuff is a given when talking about finance really.

    The issue with this conversation is that one's ability to play to their strengths as a NatSci student (within finance/business) largely depends on what 'stream' or 'focus' said person goes down.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Would agree with the latter of your post, but not the first point. NatSci with a focus on Bio-Chem NatSci would be absolutely fine for specialising in Healthcare/Pharma IB/ER.

    Wrt tech teams, I don't see how NatSci would greatly help. Maybe in clean tech or some form of renewables specialisation, but, apart from that most coverage teams would take on any grads. I'm not so sure there would be any immediate 'preconceptions' held against a NatSci student - their performance at interview is largely down to how well they come across. ECs/leadership stuff is a given when talking about finance really.

    The issue with this conversation is that one's ability to play to their strengths as a NatSci student (within finance/business) largely depends on what 'stream' or 'focus' said person goes down.

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    It just seemed to be a common theme at a few of the firms I applied for (One of them said it would consider you for any team except for healthcare/pharma unless you had an advanced degree in those fields) - Having said that, these weren't bigger banks where they weren't so concerned at a graduate level.

    Physics can help with the tech side though not as much as compsci or engineering. Again from my own applications, many tech specialist firms required a degree in either Maths, Physics, Engineering or Comp Sci.

    The preconception stuff was actually from interview feedback where (more than one) interviewers stated that they were surprised that my people skills were good considering I have a Physics background (this may be specifically physics though).

    Agreed, though it does mean that if you are doing NatSci then you should consider what you want from your career when deciding how to specialise - don't specialise in physics if you want to be in a healthcare/pharma team etc.
 
 
 
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