Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

Realistic chances of marketing job without marketing degree? watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    If my degree is in another subject, but I have gained some relevant skills and maybe part-time work, is it possible to get a job in marketing without the degree?

    Having looked on job sites, most of them require a degree in marketing.

    I want to study something else as I am confident I can get the skills outside of this, but I can't afford not to be employed upon graduation, so any input appreciated.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    You can start from the bottom of the chain and work your way up, however big companies will along the line ask you to take a degree in Marketing - they'll probably pay you to go to a private institution.
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by RandomStudent890)
    .... however big companies will along the line ask you to take a degree in Marketing - they'll probably pay you to go to a private institution.
    No they don't. And certainly not if you already have a degree.

    They may give you the opportunity to do a CIM or similar qualification but it's entirely voluntary.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    Ah, then my apologies
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by J_89)
    If my degree is in another subject, but I have gained some relevant skills and maybe part-time work, is it possible to get a job in marketing without the degree?

    Having looked on job sites, most of them require a degree in marketing.

    I want to study something else as I am confident I can get the skills outside of this, but I can't afford not to be employed upon graduation, so any input appreciated.
    You rarely need a marketing degree, certainly not for grad schemes.

    For example - Unilever, any degree
    https://www.unilever.co.uk/careers/g...flp/marketing/

    P&G http://we.experiencepg.com/home/graduates.html

    WPP http://www.wpp.com/wpp/careers/marketing/graduates/
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    It is fairly common for graduate employers to ask for you to have a marketing (or similar) degree. Annoyingly because so many people have marketing/businesses degrees that its just raising the bar to become the norm.

    However its not always the case, as said by jneill above, but you may struggle to compete with students who have specialised in marketing, unless your a top bloke.

    However, if you beef up your CV with a lot of marketing related things + lots of relevant marketing experience, im sure you will be fine.

    I recommend:
    - looking into studying with the Chartered Institute of Marketing (i did the foundation certificate and it was fairlyeasy. Cost about £140 though, maybe £250 now not sure). You learn a lot and its a professional body and is valued by employers.
    - Do marketing internships/part time marketing work, even if you dont get any money. I did 17 months unpaid marketing work in my first and 2nd year which helped me get my placement.
    - Be active in your universities business/marketing society. Try and get in the commitee.
    - Do some freelance work online. Go on fivesquid and do marketing research for businesses. Could look good on CV.
    - start a marketing blog.
    - start a small business. Employers love to hear about that stuff. Gives you an opportunity to do some real marketing
    - Sort out your personal branding

    I have done/tried these things if you want to hear more about any of it

    Hope any of this helps. Please excuse my dyslexia.

    source: I blog for a student advice website
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Chamchu)
    It is fairly common for graduate employers to ask for you to have a marketing (or similar) degree. Annoyingly because so many people have marketing/businesses degrees that its just raising the bar to become the norm.

    However its not always the case, as said by jneill above, but you may struggle to compete with students who have specialised in marketing, unless your a top bloke.

    However, if you beef up your CV with a lot of marketing related things + lots of relevant marketing experience, im sure you will be fine.

    I recommend:
    - looking into studying with the Chartered Institute of Marketing (i did the foundation certificate and it was fairlyeasy. Cost about £140 though, maybe £250 now not sure). You learn a lot and its a professional body and is valued by employers.
    - Do marketing internships/part time marketing work, even if you dont get any money. I did 17 months unpaid marketing work in my first and 2nd year which helped me get my placement.
    - Be active in your universities business/marketing society. Try and get in the commitee.
    - Do some freelance work online. Go on fivesquid and do marketing research for businesses. Could look good on CV.
    - start a marketing blog.
    - start a small business. Employers love to hear about that stuff. Gives you an opportunity to do some real marketing
    - Sort out your personal branding

    I have done/tried these things if you want to hear more about any of it

    Hope any of this helps. Please excuse my dyslexia.

    source: I blog for a student advice website
    Thanks for all the replies - great advice.

    It makes such a difference when people take the time to reply.

    ChamChu this was especially helpful.

    May I ask, with CIM, how does the certificate work?

    Do you do it whilst you're working, or is it something you attend and focus solely on? Is it easy to balance with full-time employment?

    Many thanks.
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by J_89)
    May I ask, with CIM, how does the certificate work?

    Do you do it whilst you're working, or is it something you attend and focus solely on? Is it easy to balance with full-time employment?

    Many thanks.
    Yes you do it while working normally and often your employer pays for it.
    http://www.cim.co.uk/qualifications/

    Also look at IDM
    https://www.theidm.com/marketing-qualifications
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by J_89)
    Thanks for all the replies - great advice.

    It makes such a difference when people take the time to reply.

    ChamChu this was especially helpful.

    May I ask, with CIM, how does the certificate work?

    Do you do it whilst you're working, or is it something you attend and focus solely on? Is it easy to balance with full-time employment?

    Many thanks.
    My university had it as an option with your first year of study so I did it with that. Made the whole thing quite easy. However, if your uni doesn't offer it, you will have to do it independently. Go on the CIM website and have a look through it. I think you can do the award via distance learning.

    You can do it while your working too. It would be part time study so you could probably do it in evenings/weekends. As long as you can attend the exam it should be fine. I did it while studying in my first year and managed to do it okay while be an extremely lazy person. Its only around 2000/3000 words I think and you get about 6/8 months to do it (my memory sucks). Maybe give them a ring
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by Chamchu)
    My university had it as an option with your first year of study so I did it with that. Made the whole thing quite easy.
    That's a great idea

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Chamchu)
    My university had it as an option with your first year of study so I did it with that. Made the whole thing quite easy. However, if your uni doesn't offer it, you will have to do it independently. Go on the CIM website and have a look through it. I think you can do the award via distance learning.

    You can do it while your working too. It would be part time study so you could probably do it in evenings/weekends. As long as you can attend the exam it should be fine. I did it while studying in my first year and managed to do it okay while be an extremely lazy person. Its only around 2000/3000 words I think and you get about 6/8 months to do it (my memory sucks). Maybe give them a ring
    Normally CIM requires you to already have an undergrad degree. Is there any reason they let you get away with it?
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by J_89)
    Normally CIM requires you to already have an undergrad degree. Is there any reason they let you get away with it?
    I did the Foundation certificate in Marketing in my first year of uni. This is the lowest level qualification they do with basically no entry requirements (you got to be able to speak English)

    The main award most employers acknowledge is the Professional Certificate in Marketing (which you may be thinking of). The entry requirements are 1 of:

    - CIM Level 3 Certificate in Marketing qualification (The foundation certification)
    - Any relevant Level 3 qualification
    - Any UK degree or international equivalentInternational Baccalaureate (equivalent to NQF Level 3 and above)
    - Professional practice (suggested one year in a marketing role) plus diagnostic assessment onto Level 4

    So if you got a degree or the foundation certificate, or 1 year in marketing you should be okay? I'm not 100% sure though.

    You can also do bite size module award things which only take a few months and is less work. I would give them a ring thou as the website is confusing.

    Hope this helps
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    This may be a late reply, however I wanted to pitch in.

    I have recently graduated University with a 2:2 in Fine Art, and within a week received a job offer at a very well established company as a Marketing Assistant. I have little experience in marketing (I did a little digital marketing when I was 15-18) however I showed this to my interviewers and gave them evidence of gaining new traffic to my social media profile and how I did it. I also had to undergo a written exercise (that I didn't even finish, there were 2 and I was still on the first when they came back!) but I must have impressed them with my writing skills. This is important if your job consists of copy/content writing.

    I also broke my back researching into the marketing industry up until the interview - everything from SEO, PPC, Link Juice etc. The rest is obvious - research into the company, how to do well in an interview etc etc. If I could manage it, I'm sure you can.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Every chance... You don't necessarily have to have studied Marketing in order to pursue a career in it, so long as you have the skills that are required.

    I've worked in Marketing for over 2 years since graduating - I studied International Business & German, with just two marketing modules over the 3 years.
    • TSR Group Staff
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Group Staff
    Of course! You can 100% get into marketing without a marketing degree. I'm a head of marketing at TSR and have a history degree, my exec has a journalism degree, my other exec has a marketing and events HND but I would happily have appointed her without it. My Chief Marketing Officer (boss) has a economics degree.

    When I interview grads I look for a basic understanding of a few marketing principles, some digital credentials and super-hot organisational skills / indication they will work well under pressure.
    Marketing principles - just using words like "tone of voice", brand / direct response, content marketing, customer acquisition / cost per acquisition, creativity etc. is enough to make me confident they "get it" enough to be able to work with them to develop their skills.
    Digital credentials - I love to see a blog, employer suitable twitter account (ideally on marketing or comms), insta account with loads of followers - if I'm asking someone to position my company online I'd be reassured they can position themselves online
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    I did an degree not related to marketing and ended up in a marketing role because I started a blog and started to learn about social media and SEO. Show that you want to learn, the evidence of what you have learnt and somebody will give you a chance . Good luck!
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    I did my degree in law, graduated in 2014, did a graduate scheme with a big 4 company and now I'm applying for marketing grad schemes as I want a career change. So far I haven't found my lack of marketing qualifications or experience a bar and I seem to be progressing in the schemes I apply for

    Hope this helps!
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?
Useful resources

Quick Link:

Unanswered Marketing,Sales ad PR Threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.