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    I'm 16 years old, what year/grade in the USA school I be in? Also by the time I move I would have done my GCSEs lets say I am unhappy with my results can I take normal schooling in USA because their schooling finishes at Grade 12 and get their Diploma and GPA's?

    Many thanks!
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    (Original post by Xversion101)
    I'm 16 years old, what year/grade in the USA school I be in? Also by the time I move I would have done my GCSEs lets say I am unhappy with my results can I take normal schooling in USA because their schooling finishes at Grade 12 and get their Diploma and GPA's?

    Many thanks!
    Right now, probably grade 10. If you've just finished your GCSEs, it would match up with going into the AP schedule for US schools.

    Unknown on the second part of your question. You probably would have to supplant your transcript with your GCSE grades because most people graduating from a US system school would have 4 years worth of marks, not just 2.
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    Just wondering, do American's still take honors classes in their last two years of high school and because I would have done GCSE's at this point, would I still have to do the honor classes.

    (Original post by zombiejon)
    Right now, probably grade 10. If you've just finished your GCSEs, it would match up with going into the AP schedule for US schools.

    Unknown on the second part of your question. You probably would have to supplant your transcript with your GCSE grades because most people graduating from a US system school would have 4 years worth of marks, not just 2.
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    (Original post by Xversion101)
    Just wondering, do American's still take honors classes in their last two years of high school and because I would have done GCSE's at this point, would I still have to do the honor classes.
    It varies according to the school, and the student. Some students who have a stronger mathematical/science background tend to do Honors in Grade 9 and 10, whilst others go through a basic science course, followed by Honors in Grades 11/12.

    However, due to the curriculum, I believe a school will place you directly into AP courses where necessary, as the content is similar to A Levels. You aren't expected to take the AP exam - most American students from public schools do not perform well in it anyway, since their school year doesn't cover the full curriculum. Teachers sometimes hold after school sessions to help students catch up. Taking the AP course will provide an immediate boost to your high school GPA, as it is usually graded on a scale above 4.0.
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    Alright many thanks for your information, however does taking an AP Exam help me get into more competitive universities or will the course be sufficient
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    AP exams are similar to A-levels, but are not treated at all the same way. If you want to apply to Ivies or whatever, you basically need them, but they will be looking at the whole picture. The AP exam scores are not as critical. They also look at SAT Is and SAT IIs, your grades from teachers, the difficulty of your classes and your school, academic achievements, ECs, and other non academic factors. Most students applying to ordinary universities do not submit AP exams or SAT IIs at all. However, for better school, they are a needed and a major factor in admissions.
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    (Original post by mathplustutornj)
    AP exams are similar to A-levels, but are not treated at all the same way. If you want to apply to Ivies or whatever, you basically need them, but they will be looking at the whole picture. The AP exam scores are not as critical. They also look at SAT Is and SAT IIs, your grades from teachers, the difficulty of your classes and your school, academic achievements, ECs, and other non academic factors. Most students applying to ordinary universities do not submit AP exams or SAT IIs at all. However, for better school, they are a needed and a major factor in admissions.
    I see, thanks for your input, great appreciated
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    If you want to apply to university back in the UK, they will look at AP exam scores, and you need to simulate 3 A-levels in relevant subjects. The US high school curriculum is less specialized and AP exams cover less material in each exam than A-levels.

    For US schools, you need to be in most or all AP classes to get in somewhere good. AP exams are sort of new. The traditional way colleges evaluated students was to look at the grades from the teachers, adjusted for the difficulty of the classes and the school. Then they started supplementing that with SAT scores.

    They haven't totally integrated looking at AP exams. Also, the British system uses the A-levels to appear to make sure students are prepared for a specific subject and to appear to have objective standards while favouring students from better schools. US schools are more looking for general ability and preparation, and they require money and don't pretend to have objective standards.
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    (Original post by mathplustutornj)
    If you want to apply to university back in the UK, they will look at AP exam scores, and you need to simulate 3 A-levels in relevant subjects. The US high school curriculum is less specialized and AP exams cover less material in each exam than A-levels.

    For US schools, you need to be in most or all AP classes to get in somewhere good. AP exams are sort of new. The traditional way colleges evaluated students was to look at the grades from the teachers, adjusted for the difficulty of the classes and the school. Then they started supplementing that with SAT scores.

    They haven't totally integrated looking at AP exams. Also, the British system uses the A-levels to appear to make sure students are prepared for a specific subject and to appear to have objective standards while favouring students from better schools. US schools are more looking for general ability and preparation, and they require money and don't pretend to have objective standards.
    Thanks for your reply, I plan to move to USA so that I can apply for a college in the USA and by moving there I hope for the 2 years of education there I can undertake the AP Courses (rather than 3-4 A Levels I am likely to get here), and have more time to prepare for the SAT's please let me know if I am on the right lines.
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    (Original post by Xversion101)
    Thanks for your reply, I plan to move to USA so that I can apply for a college in the USA and by moving there I hope for the 2 years of education there I can undertake the AP Courses (rather than 3-4 A Levels I am likely to get here), and have more time to prepare for the SAT's please let me know if I am on the right lines.
    Not sure if you are in the UK, but I wouldn't recommend moving to the US so as to prepare for US colleges. The US system is less rigid, less exam oriented and more subjective than the British system. They will evaluate you based on the system you are in. You don't have to meet any fixed standards.

    There might be some disadvantage in being an international applicant, particularly from Asia. Also, with the A-levels, you will be more specialized, which might be a disadvantage.
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    (Original post by mathplustutornj)
    Not sure if you are in the UK, but I wouldn't recommend moving to the US so as to prepare for US colleges. The US system is less rigid, less exam oriented and more subjective than the British system. They will evaluate you based on the system you are in. You don't have to meet any fixed standards.

    There might be some disadvantage in being an international applicant, particularly from Asia. Also, with the A-levels, you will be more specialized, which might be a disadvantage.
    I'm from the UK (in Year 11), and doing my GCSE's over the next few weeks and from what I've read and what you said applying Internatinationally has a severe disadvantage, and by "
    US system is less rigid, less exam oriented and more subjective", if I move there now what would be my advantages vs disadvantages
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    An advantage in moving to the US applying to US schools are you would not be treated as an international, as you mentioned. You would also be taking a more general curriculum. In the US, basically everyone studies 5 subjects, maths, science, history/government/geography, English, and a foreign language. If you take A-levels, you will be more specialised, and US schools may be more confused about your qualifications. It is important you attend US schools in a fancy area or special ones with admissions requirements, as some schools will not prepare you well for top colleges, and there are less objective standards to compensate. Not sure it is worth moving to apply to US schools, but I don't know your situation.
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    (Original post by mathplustutornj)
    An advantage in moving to the US applying to US schools are you would not be treated as an international, as you mentioned. You would also be taking a more general curriculum. In the US, basically everyone studies 5 subjects, maths, science, history/government/geography, English, and a foreign language. If you take A-levels, you will be more specialised, and US schools may be more confused about your qualifications. It is important you attend US schools in a fancy area or special ones with admissions requirements, as some schools will not prepare you well for top colleges, and there are less objective standards to compensate. Not sure it is worth moving to apply to US schools, but I don't know your situation.

    I'm looking to apply for Ivy League Schools as well as other top ranked colleges (It's my dream), and my situation is as follows:

    - Excepted to get 6 A*s, 2 A's in GCSE (as well as 2 Distinction Stars in BTEC Business and Sport)
    - Planning to move to California or Chicago where my Uncles live, but Chicago is more a likely choice
    - I need an F1 Visa to move there, which is pretty easy to gain if I pay $3000-$10,000 (£7000~) a year for High School (for 2 years) and this for a Public Institution
    - Costs for living will be covered for / sponsored by Parents and my Uncle for the two years

    and here is the advantages I have in mind:

    - Not be treated as an International Student (higher chance for Ivy League Schools and pretty much every other college).
    - A chance to gain a GPA (instead of showing just GCSE's and use the GCSE's as a bonus?) by doing AP Courses at school.
    - More opportunities and resources available for the SAT Test.
    - Provided that I get outstanding grades (which I am absolutely determined for), I will have access to Scholarships and Grants.
    - I won't do A Levels which will specialize me into specific subjects.
    - I'll get a Driver's License at a younger age which is accepted in more countries.

    and the disadvantages:

    - Have to pay for High School which I don't have to in the UK (but then again, if it works out I'll have a much better result at the end and a better chance to attend an Ivy League School?).
    - Miss my family for a whole load of years (but I am sure to visit them in Semester holidays, should I move to the USA).
    - Make new friends at a new (type) of school and education system, climate and language (which isn't a challenge but something to look out for).

    There might have been a few I forgotten.

    Because of International Grading, I heard that an A here is an A+ in USA for GCSE and what is a BTEC (at GCSE Level worth, I think its Level 2 we do) and I'm doing just a normal GCSE, not an I-GCSE, would this be true (atleast for grading purposes?)

    But I cannot express how much I appreciate your help, it means a world to me - THANKS A LOT!
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    If you're not a citizen, or green card holder, you will be treated as if you're an international student. Schools such as Stanford, etc will also take into account ability to pay, since f-1 visa holders are not eligible for financial aid

    None of the schools you are aiming for give academic scholarships, so I wouldn't count on that

    Also, the AP exam is not new, and has been used in admissions for around 60 years. There's a famous movie "Stand And Deliver" that's based on the true story of a teacher from a very poor high school that starts up one of the most successful AP Calculus programs in California

    Certain AP exams btw are tougher than their British counterparts.. The AP Physics C is significantly harder than A level Physics
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    (Original post by CrimsonDucati)
    If you're not a citizen, or green card holder, you will be treated as if you're an international student. Schools such as Stanford, etc will also take into account ability to pay, since f-1 visa holders are not eligible for financial aid

    None of the schools you are aiming for give academic scholarships, so I wouldn't count on that

    Also, the AP exam is not new, and has been used in admissions for around 60 years. There's a famous movie "Stand And Deliver" that's based on the true story of a teacher from a very poor high school that starts up one of the most successful AP Calculus programs in California

    Certain AP exams btw are tougher than their British counterparts.. The AP Physics C is significantly harder than A level Physics
    Can I not apply to be a citizen with an F-1 visa?
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    You have to be in the country at least 5 years to be a citizen.

    Also, if you are looking to get into Harvard, Yale, or Princeton, it is easier if not international, but it depends if they want to take you. Having great academics doesn't get you in. Together they take about 5000 students a year in a country 5x the population of the UK. At most 40% of those admitted don't have "hooks". Hooks are like being a recruited athlete, parents or grandparents or whatever are big donors, high class or political connections, being black, Hispanic, or native American, or being from an underrepresented state like North Dakota or Arkansas or something.

    If you have top academics, you will get into excellent US schools though, but probably not the very top. You can also simulate A-levels with AP exams and apply to Oxbridge, LSE, etc.
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    (Original post by Xversion101)
    Can I not apply to be a citizen with an F-1 visa?
    you won't be a citizen by the time you apply.

    It's not imposible for you to get into an ivy, or Stanford. Obviously, people get in.

    The thing is, very few get in without extraordinary achievements or connections


    If you look at stats for Uk citizens getting into Harvard, one year 30 got in, but you delve a bit deeper, and see around 20 or more were from 3 of the most prestigious schools in the UK

    You should apply though. The worst that will happen is that they say no. Nothing to lose, and everything to gain.
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    I doubt most British applicants accepted at Harvard were from top public schools, but there probably were a significant number. It isn't as much the class system as in Britain. However, they take a significant percentage from top prep schools with strong family connections. Then they take some with political and other connections. However, most of the hooks though are buying your way in. Some people have family who have donated for generations, but usually if they say you are on the waiting list, they will accept you based on a donation. These are private schools and they make their money charging huge tuition and more from wealthy people trying to buy career success and status.

    There was a recent President who went to Yale. His test scores were probably the equivalent of Bs and Cs on A-levels, but he was from a top prep school, his father and grandfather went to Yale, were wealthy and probably gave a lot of money, and he had huge political connections, so he had all the qualifications.

    Maybe the majority have money or connections. Then they accept athletes and people from underrepresented ethnic groups or geographical areas. Then a lot of it is whether they think you will be successful and whether you will be a fun member of the club.

    There are stories in the British press about students who got 4 or more A*s and were turned down by Oxford. In the US, this isn't a story. You don't expect to get into Harvard or whatever based just on academics. So yeh, you probably have a better chance at top US schools by moving to the US, but it is not like you get top test scores and such and you probably get into Princeton.
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    I see thank you guys! But even if I am treated as an international can I not got sponsorships from private companies?
 
 
 
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