Mattimias
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I've received offers from both unis, and I have until June 8 to decide.

I've taken my A levels, and both offers are unconditional.

So I'd like anecdotal evidence from any of you guys and gals to help me decide. Say anything about Edinburgh and Bath that I might love or hate, it's up to you.
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ora7497
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I don't do maths at Bath but have friends that do, and it does seem like hard work but still edinburgh would probably be the same tbh. I love Bath (edinburgh was my second choice) everything is all on campus and within five minutes from everything and there are frequent buses into town that cost £2 for a day ticket and last to like 3am. The nights out in town are good but if you are massivly into going out edinburgh is better for that. I made the choice on bath because its so beautiful and felt like home, plus im lazy and can get up 5 mins before my lectures
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gwagon
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I went to the maths open day talk at Edinburgh. The prof seems like a very straight forward guy and honestly the city is amazing.
Idk about Bath, but it has a better reputation if you want to get into finance(IB).
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Sandtrooper
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(Original post by Mattimias)
I've received offers from both unis, and I have until June 8 to decide.

I've taken my A levels, and both offers are unconditional.

So I'd like anecdotal evidence from any of you guys and gals to help me decide. Say anything about Edinburgh and Bath that I might love or hate, it's up to you.
I've been to Bath a few times, and it's probably my favourite city in the country. It would be a lovely place to live, and everyone I know who has visited loves it.

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BlueSam3
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Academic review of courses, from information available online:

Bath: Extremely strong analysis and algebra content throughout. Also some number theory (though only in year 3 for some reason), and topology, so you've got all the major bases covered. Somewhat of a lack of teaching you to program, from what I can tell (mostly just MATLAB). Force you to do statistics/probability into the second year (urgh). Overall, extremely strong course.
Edinburgh: Website very pretty, kinda *****y to use. Not as much information available. Much stronger programming element, with a variety of languages and some actual theory. First year mostly junk (since Scottish universities often accept people a year earlier, this is inevitable, ignore if on direct entry year 2). Even less number theory content. Much weaker analysis content. Very little algebra. Does have some interesting 4th/5th year courses. Vaguely OK course, but significantly weaker than Bath's
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Mattimias
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(Original post by BlueSam3)
Academic review of courses, from information available online:

Bath: Extremely strong analysis and algebra content throughout. Also some number theory (though only in year 3 for some reason), and topology, so you've got all the major bases covered. Somewhat of a lack of teaching you to program, from what I can tell (mostly just MATLAB). Force you to do statistics/probability into the second year (urgh). Overall, extremely strong course.
Edinburgh: Website very pretty, kinda *****y to use. Not as much information available. Much stronger programming element, with a variety of languages and some actual theory. First year mostly junk (since Scottish universities often accept people a year earlier, this is inevitable, ignore if on direct entry year 2). Even less number theory content. Much weaker analysis content. Very little algebra. Does have some interesting 4th/5th year courses. Vaguely OK course, but significantly weaker than Bath's
Thanks for the syllabus overview, I nearly forgot about it. Exactly what I'm looking for.


My parents are nagging at me to consider Edinburgh over Bath because Edinburgh has a better international reputation, and because they're actively looking at rankings. I've tried explaining the methodologies and how they can only really capture quantitative aspects of the universities, as opposed to qualitative. Since they're paying for the fees, they would have at least a say in where I'm going.
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Kevin De Bruyne
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(Original post by BlueSam3)
Academic review of courses, from information available online:

Bath: Extremely strong analysis and algebra content throughout. Also some number theory (though only in year 3 for some reason), and topology, so you've got all the major bases covered. Somewhat of a lack of teaching you to program, from what I can tell (mostly just MATLAB). Force you to do statistics/probability into the second year (urgh). Overall, extremely strong course.
Edinburgh: Website very pretty, kinda *****y to use. Not as much information available. Much stronger programming element, with a variety of languages and some actual theory. First year mostly junk (since Scottish universities often accept people a year earlier, this is inevitable, ignore if on direct entry year 2). Even less number theory content. Much weaker analysis content. Very little algebra. Does have some interesting 4th/5th year courses. Vaguely OK course, but significantly weaker than Bath's

Just a slight correction - neither statistics nor probability is compulsory on either course (Straights Maths Vs MathSci) although avoiding probability/stats on straight maths would force you to do either Physics or Computer Science modules. I'd never really thought about it, but you're right, they don't really teach you how to use MATLAB


(Original post by Mattimias)
Thanks for the syllabus overview, I nearly forgot about it. Exactly what I'm looking for.


My parents are nagging at me to consider Edinburgh over Bath because Edinburgh has a better international reputation, and because they're actively looking at rankings. I've tried explaining the methodologies and how they can only really capture quantitative aspects of the universities, as opposed to qualitative. Since they're paying for the fees, they would have at least a say in where I'm going.
I love it here at Bath - you get to study some quite interesting modules in the second/third year if you're on MathSci (eg Econometrics, Accounting, Finance, Education, Marketing, graph theory etc).
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Mattimias
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(Original post by SeanFM)
Just a slight correction - neither statistics nor probability is compulsory on either course (Straights Maths Vs MathSci) although avoiding probability/stats on straight maths would force you to do either Physics or Computer Science modules. I'd never really thought about it, but you're right, they don't really teach you how to use MATLAB
To be honest I'd take as many modules as I can. My social life's practically non-existent anyway.
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Kevin De Bruyne
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(Original post by Mattimias)
To be honest I'd take as many modules as I can. My social life's practically non-existent anyway.
:lol: I admire your enthusiasm, but you only need a certain amount and it'd be quite stressful (and your timetable would look awful) if you tried to take more than you need, and uni is about having fun, whether it's by yourself or with other people.
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Mattimias
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(Original post by SeanFM)
:lol: I admire your enthusiasm, but you only need a certain amount and it'd be quite stressful (and your timetable would look awful) if you tried to take more than you need, and uni is about having fun, whether it's by yourself or with other people.
I'm from Singapore, so I'm used to an exhausting workload. Besides, I still have over a year to read up on notes I've obtained from certain sources (entering in 2017) so I'll be at the very least prepared for some of it.

Still, you do have a point about having fun. Thing is, I have fun when I do maths...
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Mattimias
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(Original post by SeanFM)
I love it here at Bath - you get to study some quite interesting modules in the second/third year if you're on MathSci (eg Econometrics, Accounting, Finance, Education, Marketing, graph theory etc).
I chose just Maths. It's possible to switch, right?
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Kevin De Bruyne
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(Original post by Mattimias)
I'm from Singapore, so I'm used to an exhausting workload. Besides, I still have over a year to read up on notes I've obtained from certain sources (entering in 2017) so I'll be at the very least prepared for some of it.

Still, you do have a point about having fun. Thing is, I have fun when I do maths...
:lol: I can imagine, the Asian education system is quite something.

But I don't know, lectures can take a lot out of you - 4 hours in lecture theatres are a lot different to 4 hours in the same class, and not all bits of Maths'll be fun for you wherever you go, unless you're.. really lucky but I must stress that it's not just about your degree classification but other things that you achieve outside of the classroom while you're at uni.


(Original post by Mattimias)
I chose just Maths. It's possible to switch, right?

Correct - I switched from Maths to MathSci as well, and you can do that after your first year as the modules are identical in year 1. They'll explain it to you (I can't remember how much) but long story short, it's not worth being on straight Maths when you can be on MathSci because with MathSci you can choose all of the modules that Mathematics students can, but not vice versa.
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Mattimias
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(Original post by SeanFM)
:lol: I can imagine, the Asian education system is quite something.

But I don't know, lectures can take a lot out of you - 4 hours in lecture theatres are a lot different to 4 hours in the same class, and not all bits of Maths'll be fun for you wherever you go, unless you're.. really lucky but I must stress that it's not just about your degree classification but other things that you achieve outside of the classroom while you're at uni.


Correct - I switched from Maths to MathSci as well, and you can do that after your first year as the modules are identical in year 1. They'll explain it to you (I can't remember how much) but long story short, it's not worth being on straight Maths when you can be on MathSci because with MathSci you can choose all of the modules that Mathematics students can, but not vice versa.
Ah, good point about the lectures.

Are there any requirements to switch?
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Kevin De Bruyne
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(Original post by Mattimias)
Ah, good point about the lectures.

Are there any requirements to switch?
None at all, I think it's just a matter of space. I think you can also switch to MMath (which only exists for Mathematics, so you'd either have to choose the right pure/analysis modules on MathSci or be on Mathematics) depending on your first year grade but that's a bit messy and can wait till you get here

Also, Bath's course has a placement year - I'm not sure about Edinburgh, but if it doesn't have one then that is something to think about.
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Mattimias
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(Original post by SeanFM)
None at all, I think it's just a matter of space. I think you can also switch to MMath (which only exists for Mathematics, so you'd either have to choose the right pure/analysis modules on MathSci or be on Mathematics) depending on your first year grade but that's a bit messy and can wait till you get here

Also, Bath's course has a placement year - I'm not sure about Edinburgh, but if it doesn't have one then that is something to think about.
I didn't apply for the one with an industrial placement year for some reason, now that I think about it seems a bit stupid. Should I go for one, even though it adds a year?
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Kevin De Bruyne
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(Original post by Mattimias)
I didn't apply for the one with an industrial placement year for some reason, now that I think about it seems a bit stupid. Should I go for one, even though it adds a year?
You can also change to that one in the second year, or even after you've found a placement.

It's up to you - I think there are a lot of benefits to doing one, like money, experience, a potential job offer at the end, and apparently it helps with your attitude in the third year and helps you work harder or something I'm starting my placement at Sainsbury's this year, it's very exciting.
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BizzStrut
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(Original post by Mattimias)
To be honest I'd take as many modules as I can. My social life's practically non-existent anyway.
There's no reason that can't change when you get here and out of Singapore's stressful educational system.
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ODES_PDES
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Bath for me!!
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Mattimias
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(Original post by SeanFM)
You can also change to that one in the second year, or even after you've found a placement.

It's up to you - I think there are a lot of benefits to doing one, like money, experience, a potential job offer at the end, and apparently it helps with your attitude in the third year and helps you work harder or something I'm starting my placement at Sainsbury's this year, it's very exciting.
Nicely done! Yeah, I can see why it'd be useful. But I'd really like to do academic research - I know that I don't really know what it's like because I haven't done a full thesis, but I've had a taste of research when writing a mini-thesis for my A level paper 3 for Philosophy, and other programmes I joined in my schools had me doing parts of the research process.

(Original post by BizzStrut)
There's no reason that can't change when you get here and out of Singapore's stressful educational system.
I wasn't really stressed at school - I don't mug or cram, I just listen to lectures, do my homework and some extra stuff for clarification and understanding. Sure, the usual exam nervousness was there, but I knew I could do well enough to get into somewhere like Edinburgh or Bath. Singapore's education system was more of restful than stressful for me, oddly enough.
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Kevin De Bruyne
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(Original post by Mattimias)
Nicely done! Yeah, I can see why it'd be useful. But I'd really like to do academic research - I know that I don't really know what it's like because I haven't done a full thesis, but I've had a taste of research when writing a mini-thesis for my A level paper 3 for Philosophy, and other programmes I joined in my schools



I wasn't really stressed at school - I don't mug or cram, I just listen to lectures, do my homework and some extra stuff for clarification and understanding. Sure, the usual exam nervousness was there, but I knew I could do well enough to get into somewhere like Edinburgh or Bath. Singapore's education system was more of restful than stressful for me, oddly enough.
Ah, I see. There's a project option (you work with a lecturer and write about something in detail) in the third year so that's a start, then I guess you can decide if you want to go further or if there is a particular area that interests you.
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