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    Hi!

    I am a second-year mathematics and computer science student Warwick University.

    I am currently preparing for an exam in a module called Algorithmic Graph Theory, and I am having some particular challenges (which also apply to most of the mathematics modules that I'm taking).

    In short, I would ideally like to be able to solve all past paper problems before the date of the exam. However, it invariably takes me a long time to solve a past paper problem (usually, problems consist of designing algorithms to solve a particular task). This is not ideal, because I don't have such time in the exam.

    Does anybody have any suggestions for balancing my desire to solve every past paper problem successfully with the limited time that I have. I want to maximise my chances of exam success!

    Thank you.

    CKKOY
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    (Original post by CKKOY)
    Does anybody have any suggestions for balancing my desire to solve every past paper problem successfully with the limited time that I have. I want to maximise my chances of exam success!

    Thank you.

    CKKOY
    For what it is worth, my attitude towards maths is that it is one of the few subjects you can't revise. Instead you have to practice. And just as getting good at a musical instrument involves learning scales and arpeggios on the road to playing repertoire music, so to maths involves practising elements and techniques of mathematics that might not be directly related to your paper.

    I have absolutely no idea if this is of any help, but the best text book I found for this sort of thing was Stroud's Engineering Maths (book 1 and 2).

    Good luck!
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    (Original post by ByEeek)
    For what it is worth, my attitude towards maths is that it is one of the few subjects you can't revise. Instead you have to practice. And just as getting good at a musical instrument involves learning scales and arpeggios on the road to playing repertoire music, so to maths involves practising elements and techniques of mathematics that might not be directly related to your paper.

    I have absolutely no idea if this is of any help, but the best text book I found for this sort of thing was Stroud's Engineering Maths (book 1 and 2).

    Good luck!
    Thank you for this. I will have a look at the book!
 
 
 
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